Tag Archives: word of mouth marketing

Contagious: How to Make Products, Ideas, and Behaviors Catch On

11/02/15
TMRE Keynote Presentation
Contagious: How to Make Products, Ideas, and Behaviors Catch On
By Jonah Berger, Professor of Marketing, The Wharton School
at the University of Pennsylvania
Berger starts the keynote session by playing a game, Which
is Tastier
? Where two images are shown: broccoli and a cheeseburger.
The vote is cast: the majority vote, you guessed it, for the
cheeseburger. The point is simple. We all know we should eat more broccoli but
the cheeseburger beckons us.
The analogy of tasty then gets turned to ideas. Which ideas
are Tastier?
Some of the ideas are like broccoli’they are good for us,
but not desired, not catching on.
The curse of knowledge plagues the researcher.  We have to overcome what we know and
communicate in a way people will try and spread it. 
As an overview, we will explore these three, key points:
1.    
How we make ideas tastier
2.    
How we craft our insights that make people more
likely to listen
3.    
How we can use word-of-mouth to spread the idea
He asks the audience: What is the science of why people
share? Let’s tour the main points. Let’s learn about the science of social
transmission through storytelling.
Berger showed a slide proving that word-of-mouth is at least
twice as effective as advertising, according to a McKinsey study.
The first hack he shared was based on his experience in
academia. Two copies of the same book were sent to him; the second had a note
encouraging him to pass along to a colleague who may enjoy it. Berger’s point:
find the influencers and give them something to spread, and it comes across as
a recommendation.
So, why do people
share
? Here are the top driving six factors:
1.    
Social currency
2.    
Triggers
3.    
Emotion
4.    
Public
5.    
Practical Value
6.    
Stories
One way to get others to share our ideas is to make them
look good, look smarter’this is the basis of social currency.
We share things that send desired signals of who we are, our
ideal self. So do brands. How can you make your brand tribe feel smart and
in-the-know, on the inside track? If people feel special sharing our stuff,
they will.
One facet of social currency is finding the Inner
Remarkability’something surprising, novel, or interesting. Berger used the
Blendtec blending an iPhone example as the Will it Blend campaign. Blenders
sales went up 700% as a result.
The more you can show rather than tell, the more powerful.
So, what is a Trigger: something that is top-of-mind
because it is tip-of-tongue.
Consideration is 80% of purchase, and getting in the
consideration sphere is the most important part of the strategy.
Here are the four questions for getting value from triggers:
1.    
Who do we want to triggers?
2.    
When do they want to be triggered?
3.    
What is in the environment at that time?
4.    
How can we connect to the environment?
The last tactic discussed is Stories. Facts and data bore
everyone. Stories are vessels of information, a Trojan Horse, a carrier of
information. Stories imbue the emotional shorthand of a brand. Stories are the currency
of conversation.
Berger’s advice: first, find your kernel. What do you want
to pass on, to share? Then, how can you make others feel special about it,
in-the-know, and share.
Michael Graber is the
managing partner of the Southern Growth Studio, an innovation and strategic
growth firm based in Memphis, TN. Visit
www.southerngrowthstudio.com to learn more.

Six Key Factors that Drive Word of Mouth: Podcast

‘Contagious’
Author Explains How to Make a Message Viral
By Marc
Dresner, Senior Editor, IIR
It’s
well understood that word-of-mouth is an extremely influential marketing
medium, but just how powerful may surprise you.

According
to Wharton Professor of Marketing Jonah Berger, $1 invested in WOM may actually
be worth up to 10 times that of a
conventional ad dollar

Jonah Berger

‘Word-of-mouth underlies most of the decisions people
make.’
‘Word-of-mouth underlies most of the decisions people
make,’ he told The Research Insighter.
As such,
a good read on WOM may be one of the most valuable forms of consumer
intelligence one could hope for, but are we really getting one?
Researchers
and marketers have increasingly fixated on passive capture of WOM through
technology’social media analytics, NLP, etc.
But
despite all of the hype around Facebook, Twitter, etc., Berger’author of the
best-seller ‘Contagious: Why Things Catch On”points
out only about 7% of WOM
happens online
.
This
isn’t to say that social media isn’t a good WOM proxy, but Berger advises not
to get too hung up on technology and media platforms’they come and go.
‘We need
to stop thinking in terms of technology and start thinking in terms of
psychology.’

‘We all understand word-of-mouth affects sales, but most businesses aren’t
being scientific about how to harness it and use those customer insights to
drive their sales,’ he explained.
‘We need
to stop thinking about WOM in terms of technology and start thinking in terms
of psychology,’ Berger said.
In this podcast for The
Research Insighter 
interview
series, Jonah Berger
 shares his ‘STEPPS’ framework and the six
factors that prompt people to pass something on…
Listen
to the podcast!

Download
the transcript!

Editor’s note: Jonah Berger will be speaking at TMRE 2015‘The Market Research Event’now
in its 13th year as the largest, most comprehensive research conference
in the world taking place November 2-4 in Orlando.
For information or to
register, please visit
TheMarketResearchEvent.com.

Ps. SAVE $100 when you register with code TMRE15BL!

ABOUT THE AUTHOR/INTERVIEWER
Marc Dresner is IIR USA’s sr. editor and special communication project lead. He is the former executive editor of Research Business Report, a publication for the marketing research and consumer insights industry. He may be reached at mdresner@iirusa.com. Follow him @mdrezz.

Is Social Media The Place To Gripe?

This post in the New York Times calls attention to a new application called “Gripe.” Gripe is a service that allows users to automatically send customer service complaints both to a company and to their facebook and twitter followers.

The makers of Gripe claim that sending the complaints automatically to all Facebook friends will lessen the likelihood of frivolous claims, and features a “word of mouth power” rating to business owners to clarify how many potential viewers a gripe will have.

Given that many consumers are already turning to social media as a channel to vent their frustrations, it seems it was only a matter of time before an app like this was invented. It does provide an important service to businesses, as it alerts them to the problems immediately where regular complaining on a personal Facebook page could be heard by friends, but not by the offending company.

Still, is Gripe really a necessary service? Will having such a “frictionless” way to complain prevent consumers from following proper channels to settle their complaints first? What do you think?

Guru Session: …Turning Audiences into Brand Ambassadors

Join us for “Spreading the Word: Leveraging Word of Mouth to Drive Sales and Turn Audiences into Brand Ambassadors” at The Life Stage Marketing Summit 2010, this May 10-12 in Chicago.

Join Kathie Thomas and Jeff Davis of Fleishman-Hillard as they discuss how word of mouth is considered the most valuable and persuasive form of marketing these days. In fact, surveys show that nine of out every 10 consumers seek advice before making a purchase, and eight in 10 prefer advice from a peer rather than a so-called expert. These peer recommendations can increase the likelihood of purchase by 60 percent. Every company or organization has fans who would recommend their products to their peers. How can you transform them into and organized and mobilized team of brand ambassadors who authentically communicate the benefits of your brand in everyday conversations? Drawing upon the firm’s 10 years of Word of Mouth experience, Fleishman-Hillard Senior Partner Jeff Davis and Director of Innovation Kathie Thomas will discuss the power of various World of Mouth channels, from Facebook and blogs to cell phones and chats across the backyard fence — and how the Word of Mouth mix varies by age group.

Don’t miss out!

The Life Stage Marketing Summit
Brochure Download
Register Today

Twitter and Word-of-Mouth marketing

Jeremiah Owyang recently discussed the power that word of mouth marketing has, especially when combined with Twitter. The rapid speed at which information can be disbursed on Twitter makes it a powerful source for this type of marketing. If someone takes the time to retweet what you’ve said, not only did that take it as a source of information, but they went on to share that information with all of their friends.

Word of Mouth Marketing: So How was it?

Searching the blogosphere, I came across this post from one of NACCM’s keynotes speakers, Joanna Brandi. A couple of colleagues talked to Joanna about the recent experience they had at a stay at the Ritz Carlton hotel. Her friend later went on to describe the behavior of the employees there as ‘It was as if they were anticipating what I needed.’ The conversation quickly led to similar experiences (both good and bad) that they had in local restaurants. Before Joanna knew it, she had a long list of places not to go. When it comes down to recommending places based on customer experience, word of mouth marketing is crucial. Word of good customer service and bad customer service will somehow find its way spreading like a viral disease. Make sure your customers are taking care of, before they spread the word! Be sure not to miss Joanna’s Brandi’s session ‘The Positive Leader’ at NACCM where she’ll shed some more insight on customer management.