Tag Archives: women

Meet the Powerful Women Driving the Future of Customer Insights

TMRE: The Market Research Event and OmniShopper have some
exciting news to share’
Not only is TMRE partnering with WiRE (Women in Research)
for the first annual TMRE/WiRE Women in Research Award to celebrate some true
rock-star researchers, but we’re happy to share a preliminary list of powerful
women in insights confirmed to take the stage at both the TMRE and OmniShopper 2017
events.

Check out the inspiring women speaking at TMRE 2017:


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Dawn Cunningham, Chief Insights Officer, 3M
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Amber Case, Cyborg Anthropologist, Author, Calm
Technology
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Cole Nussbaum Knaffic, Founder, Storytelling
with Data
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Kristin Luck, Founder, WiRE: Women in Research
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Marina Kosten, VP Research – International
Theatrical, 20th Century Fox
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Elizabeth Merrick May, Head of Customer
Insights, Nest
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Christina Jenkins, Director, Global Business
Marketing, North America, Twitter
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Anna Fieler, Chief Marketing Officer, Popsugar
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Lisa Courtade, Head of Market Research, Merck
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Judy Melanson, SVP, Travel & Entertainment,
Chadwick Martin Bailey
??        
Amanda Hill, Chief Marketing Officer, A+E
Networks
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Margo Arton, Director of Ad Effectiveness
Research, Buzzfeed
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Lauren Zweifler, Senior Vice President
,Strategic Insights & Research, NBCUniversal
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Terrae Schroeder, Senior Director, Wholesome
& Shopper Insights, NA Snacks, Kellogg
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Theresa Pepe, VP of Research, Viacom
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Sarita Bhagwat, Vice President, Market
Intelligence, Fidelity Investments
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Julie Brown, President, The Center for Strategy
Research
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Lori Tarabeck, Global Market Insights, Abbott
Diabetes Care
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Renata Polcicio, Vice President, Fan and Media
Intelligence, International, Global Markets, ESPN
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Jennifer Avery, Director, Consumer Insights,
Universal Orlando Resort
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Sara Fahim, Senior Research & Innovation
Consultant, Seek Company
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Tiffany Sanders, Business Intelligence &
Research, CBS
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Emily Akinson, Insights & Planning, Consumer
& Market Insights, Kellogg
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Mary Beth Jowers, Consumer Insights Lead for
North, Central and Eastern Europe, Gruppo Campari
??        
Stephanie Cunningham, Senior Manager, Customer
Insights & Analytics, eBay
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Lina Roncancio, Insights & Innovation
Director, Discovery Communications Latin America
??        
Michelle Gansle, Director, Consumer & Market
Insights, Wm. Wrigley Jr. Company
??        
Karin Kricorian, Director, Management Science
and Integration, Disney
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Sarah Beachler, Director, Market Research &
Client Insights, Sephora
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Beth Coleman, SVP Marketing and Partner
Insights, Viacom
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Samantha Dawkins, Vice President, Client
Strategy & Advocacy, ADP
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Gabriela McCoy, Director of Global Consumer
Insights, Bacardi
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Kassie Deng, Director, Marketing & Partner
Insights, Viacom
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Lyndsey Albertson, Director of Sales Research,
ABC
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Maria Cristina Antonio, Director, Metabolic
Insights & Analytics, Novo Nordisk
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Julia Oswald, Senior Vice President, Strategy
& Insights, Domino’s Pizza
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Carley Metsker, Vice President, Client Service,
Directions Research
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Monika Mandrakas, Market Researcher &
Customer Advocate, Mutual of Omaha
View the TMRE brochure
for a full list of speakers:
https://goo.gl/1Ricj2
Check out the inspiring women speaking at OmniShopper 2017:

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Shopper Marketing Activations: Marketing &
Merchandising: J Lynn Martinez, Vice President & Team Lead Kroger, Dr
Pepper Snapple Group
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Customer Experience Design: How Research &
Design Collaborate to Build New and Differentiated Experiences: Kate Kompelien,
Customer Experience – Center for Excellence for Research & Strategy, Best
Buy
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Omnichannel Customer Analysis: Lakshmi
Venkataramari, Senior Director, Customer Insights & Analytics, Walmart
eCommerce
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Winning in Her Purse: Kelley Styring, Principal,
InsightFarm
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Knowledge is Power, If You Can Find It: Ashley
Starke & Diana Powell, Manager, Shopper Insights, ConAgra Foods
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Team Structure Doesn’t Matter: Sue Butler, Director
of Omnichannel Insights, Walmart
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Going Beyond Behavior to Drive Category Growth:
Monica Melichar, Senior Manager, Consumer Insights, Beam Suntory & Erin
Barber, Senior Vice President, C+R Research
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Longitudinal Data & the Low Purchase
Frequency Category: Stacy Carty, Shopper Insights, Samsung
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Driving Change While Driving the Business:
Improving Tools & Automation: Theresa Hendrickson, Director, eCommerce
Engineering – Business Tools & Processes, Best Buy
View the OmniShopper
Brochure for a full list of speakers: https://goo.gl/Qw8Juo
Use exclusive
LinkedIn discount code TMRE17LI for $100 off the current rate. Buy tickets to
TMRE now:
https://goo.gl/1Ricj2
Use exclusive
LinkedIn discount code OMNI17LI for $100 off the current rate. Buy tickets to
OmniShopper now:
https://goo.gl/Qw8Juo
Also, don’t miss our
upcoming free webinar ‘Storytelling with Data’ http://bit.ly/2o0bpAS
featuring speakers Kelsy Saulsbury, Manager, Consumer Insight & Analytics,
Schwan’s Shared Services, LLC and Bill Greenwald, Founder and Chief
Neuroleaderologist, Windsor Leadership Group, LLC. 
Driving the value of
insights forward requires much more than just unearthing great data. You need
to use that data to tell a story and command influence across the broader
organization. Because storytelling may not be an inherent skill, this webinar
focuses on how to use data to create an engaging, informative, compelling
story.  Register for the webinar here:
http://bit.ly/2o0bpAS
Cheers,
The TMRE & OmniShopper Teams
@TMRE
@OmniShopper

Live from #MediaInsight: Women + Mobile: The Unbreakable Bond

Caryn Klein, VP, Research & Insights, TIME INC.

There is an incredibly strong relationship between women and their mobile devices today.  88% of women say that their mobile device “keeps me in-the-know.”  It’s truly an addiction for many women, more so than is the case with men.  

Down time becomes now time – texting, social media, and online shopping have filled the gaps for women and essentially eliminated any down time that previously existed.  

Pinterest and Instagram have become vehicles for personal expression and inspiration.  

Online shopping has become a game for many women.  She’s looking for coupons, making shopping lists, doing her research – and it’s NOT work for her.  

Rules of engagement for women and ads:

1. Ask her permission
2. Share her interests
3. Look your best
4. Engage her in conversation: ads should be a two-way interaction – a relationship

Rewarding women for interacting with ads is huge – if you can make her a part of the message, you can break through.

Key insights:

1. It’s an unbreakable bond between women and devices – don’t butt in, but make content relevant and real

2. Down time becomes now time.  There’s more opportunity to reach women, but consider when, where, and how

3. Amplifying her voice.  She’s creating her own brand image, and can be an ambassador for yours

4. She’s using her device through every step of mobile shopping.  Knowing when, where, and how can make all the difference to your marketing strategy 

5. Mobile ads are tricky – don’t intrude, but do bring her into the conversation.  

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Ben Proctor is Insights Strategist at Miner & Co. Studio, a New York-based consultancy

Your Brain On Football

It’s kickoff time. And whether it’s played at high schools,
colleges or in NFL stadiums, football is increasingly becoming America’s game.
Women now make up 44 percent of the NFL fan base, for example, and last season,
the sport drew in a record number of Hispanic viewers as well. The game is even
a hot export, with four teams scheduled to compete in England this season. That
means that marketers are using more football imagery (and across more
categories) than ever: Sabra Hummus, in the hopes that the gridiron can make
chickpeas seem macho, is now the official dip of the NFL
For those of us who study the emotional centers of the
brain, though, the real game is in decoding why there is a growing fascination
with a decidedly primitive pastime: Winning requires speed, guts and
bone-crushing power.
In general, spectator sports get their emotional appeal from
a very basic human drive’the need to shape an identity that lets us belong to
one group, while differentiating us from others. (Like when we threw rocks at
rival tribes thousands of years ago.) But because we’re civilized now and can’t
engage in that kind of bloodthirsty bonding, sports provide a very interesting
and emotionally useful release. They allow us to explore and engage with those
primal areas of identity that we may be unable to express in the real
world. 
In the case of football, it’s a very particular mode of
vicarious identification: The ritualized conflict of the game provides an
outlet for our personal desires to be aggressive and emerge triumphant. It
provides as well an important outlet for sublimating all of the slights and
injuries we suffer in the real world, but can’t do anything about directly. We
may not be allowed to knock irritating coworkers to the ground. But our beloved
Giants (or Vikings, Broncos or Bears) can.
Of course, all sports are ritualized conflict, to a degree.
But because football is more full-throatedly physical, it’s more emotionally
visceral. (My apologies to those who have been body slammed in basketball
games.)  In fact, football is probably
the closest thing we have to a modern day form of the gladiatorial contest ‘
the popular (so we hear) spectator sport for our ancestors.
Affiliation with the local team of football warriors is so
powerful for some people that it spills out beyond weekend games. They express
their feelings of belonging through bumper stickers, tattoos, team jerseys, and
house flags (I keep waiting to see motorcycle helmets.)
 
Sports team loyalties also provide strong social signal value,
as we become members of a ‘club’ of those around us who like and follow a team.
The explosion of fantasy leagues has created a new level of fandom, where we
actually get to manage teams, as well as watch them.
Women join the huddle

The emergence of women as a key fan base for the NFL,
though, is even more fascinating. Women’s roles have evolved, moving from historic
social pressures to seem (if not actually be) submissive, into a modern social
context that allows ‘ or even encourages — being increasingly assertive.  Football provides another place for women to
swap out the old fashioned pacifist, nurturing role and try on something a
little different.
This piece of cultural evolution has an interesting double
edge: at the same time that football is having an impact on women’s changing emotional
lives, women’s emotional orientation is influencing the culture of football.  Women’s increasing involvement in football
(both as activist parent and as spectator) is very probably implicated in the much
greater attentiveness in football at all levels to its risks, especially
concussions and the role they play in serious brain injury.
While some people may lament what they see as a sissification,
(I concede it was probably fun to watch guys with swords compete in pits
thousands of years ago, too.) having spectator sports that bring both sexes
together in a continuously evolving ‘modern gladiatorial game’ is probably an
emotionally desirable outlet for modern life.
So let’s salute the arrival of another football season ‘
giving us a great opportunity to cut loose when we need to and give the ‘bad
guys’ some serious pushing, shoving, and a good taste of the dirt.  Our vicarious victories will as always have a
thousand fathers (we really annihilated ‘em!) while our team’s defeats can remain
orphans (the bums just couldn’t get it together.) And then of course there’s
that Seven Layer Bean Dip’
About the Author:
David Forbes holds a Ph.D. in clinical and cognitive psychology from Clark
University, and was a member of the faculties of Harvard Medical School
Department of Psychiatry and the Harvard Laboratory of Human Development before
beginning his career as a business consultant. He founded Forbes Consulting
over 20 years ago as a strategic market research consultancy dedicated to
creating business advantage through psychological consumer insights. He has
since built Forbes into a major resource for scores of major corporations in
the CPG, Financial Services, and Pharmaceuticals industries, domestically and
internationally. David is the creator of the MindSight?? emotional
assessment technologies, a suite of applied neuropsychological methods for understanding
consumer emotion and motivation, without the distortions of conscious editing
and self presentation.  

Targeting half the market

A new article at Marketing Week takes a look at how companies are focusing their market efforts on women. Brands like Motorola, Nintendo, Apple and Ford are creating products specifically to appeal to this half of the market. Ford is releasing a pink Fiesta and Coors is releasing Blue Moon, after seeing success with Coors Light and Kasteel Cru, in the UK, a market where 12% of the female population drink beer.

Speaker Profile: Colleen Fahey Rush


With the The Market Research Event quickly approaching, we would like to introduce you another keynote speaker that we will have this year at our event. This year, The Market Research Event will take place from October 13 – 16, 2008 in Anaheim, California at the Disneyland Hotel. This week, we would like to introduce you to Colleen Fahey Rush, the Executive Vice President or Research at MTV Networks. As the Executive VP of MTV Networks, Rush oversees research groups for the company by providing oversight, guidance and council. She finds insights dealing with many demographics including kids, teens, young adults, men, women, and boomer audiences. Her research focuses on engagement and understanding consumer behavior and performance across new and engaging platforms. Rush began at CBS, and followed by becoming the Director of Research at Telemundo. In 1996, she joined MTV, and before she was promoted to her current positin, she was the Senior Vice President of Research at VH1 and CMT.
Read a number of studies that have been contributed by Rush:The relationship between youth and digital technology
‘The Hills’ is Alive
Money Meets Mobility Portability’s Sweet Spot
MTV Gives Casual Games a Closer Look
Engagement On For Online Games: MTVN Study

We invite you to come see Colleen Fahey Rush at The Market Research Event as she presents his keynote speech on Thursday, October 16th, Driving Change and Innovation at MTVN.. (Source: ARF Board)