Tag Archives: Wired (magazine)

Redefining the Path from Data Collection to Insight Curation at InsighTech

With unprecedented speed, technology is dramatically
disrupting the way we gather data, connect the dots and tell our insights
stories. The producers of The Market Research Event (TMRE) are excited to
invite you to the all-new InsighTech event. Redefining the path from data
collection to insight curation, InsighTech presents groundbreaking innovations
in the deployment of traditional and new research methodologies. Hear best in
class case studies from your peers, participate in experiential field trips AND
discover emerging technology likely to disrupt the industry even further. This
dual approach ensures you will be able to apply what you learn immediately AND
prepare for the future.
Learn more about this exciting event here: http://bit.ly/1GvhBrq
Featured speakers
include:
The Future of Technology & What it Means for Your
Business: Chris Anderson, Former Editor-in-chief, WIRED, Author, The Long Tail
& Co-founder and CEO, 3D Robotics
The Futures of Market Research: Robert Moran, Partner &
Global Head, Brunswick Insight
Scaling Research for Breakthrough Innovation – The Platform
Approach: Daniela Busse, Director, Global Innovation Network, Citi
Ventures
Download the brochure
for a full list of speakers:
http://bit.ly/1GvhBrq
Plus industry experts from Twitter, LinkedIn, Jawbone &
more will discuss how the research process is and will be effected by:
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Neuromarketing
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3D Printing
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Virtual Shopping
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Artificial Intelligence
??        
Internet of Things
??        
Social Gaming
??        
Crowdsourcing
??        
Big Data
??        
Wearables
??        
Data Delivery & Visualization
??        
Mobile Research
??        
Text Analytics
??        
Social Analytics
??        
Geo-location
??        
And more!
InsighTech will cover everything from mobile research to
drones. Do not miss out on this unique experience that is focused on innovation
in research methodology & technology!
Mention code TECH15LII & Save $100 off the
standard rate. Register today:
http://bit.ly/1GvhBrq

Cheers,
The InsighTech Team
@TMRE
#InsighTech15

Themarketresearcheventblog.iirusa.com

TMRE 2010: Tablet Computers, Closed Internet Applications and The Future of Research

by Kathryn Korostoff, Research Rockstar LLC

[This is an article inspired by Chris Anderson, Author of 'Free: The Future of A Radical Price,' ' The Long Tail,' and Editor of Wired magazine, who was our morning speaker.]

I must start with a confession. When Chris started his talk, he stated that he was not going to be addressing the planned topic (the one that appeared in the show schedule)’which was to be on his popular book, ‘Free.’ Instead has was going to discuss his current passion, the rise of tablet computers.

The ‘Free’ topic had intrigued me. After all, as market researchers, pricing research in many markets gets rather complicated as we deal with the increasing notion ‘of ‘free’ and ‘freemium.’ I was looking forward to learning more about the topic.

But after awhile, Chris had me hooked.

His talk opened with the topic of, ‘The Web is Dead”a cover story from a recent Wired magazine issue. I had read the story in the magazine when it came out, and you can read for yourself here (LINK)’complete with some cool graphics. But the key point is all about applications. He sees a rising tide of ‘closed gardens’ on the Internet’and that is where is the best content and applications will live (relegating the ‘open’ web to enthusiasts, amateurs, and those applications that are only valuable if everyone can access them, such as shopping sites).

He also shared some fascinating data about the impact of tablet computers. According to Anderson, tablet computers (the iPad or any of an emerging plethora of choices) fundamentally change behavior as compared to laptop use. An anecdote that was light-hearted but telling: he shared that his wife bans laptops from the bedroom (keyboard typing sounds are not acceptable), but he is allowed to bring his iPad to bed. Anderson is clearly a fan of tablets; he also stated that his current laptop is probably his last’his future devices will be tablets, he asserts.

Ultimately, he focused on the idea of the web and laptops, versus the internet (closed applications not visible to Google) and tablets. His thesis is that there are trends towards both Internet-based applications and tablets that will fundamentally change what is possible (products, pricing) and how customers will behave (physically, product usage, and purchase behaviors).

So rather than further paraphrase his talk and the ‘Web is Dead’ article, let’s get right to the point: what does all of this stuff mean to market researchers? What are the specific opportunity and threats we will be facing?

1. Opportunities in Finger Tracking
Finger tracking will be a huge source of behavioral data. Analogous to eye tracking, finger tracking on a tablet gives researchers an objective measure of what ads get touched, how fingers move across a screen of choices, and so on. Tablet applications capture this data whether online or offline’so the data is objective, and whole. Amazing. Just sitting there I imagined how many fellow audience members are now plotting to open up agencies and technology providers dedicated to harvesting this new data source!

2. Tablets as a Data Gathering Device
Tablets are a reading device. According to Anderson, an analysis was done on one of Wired’s sister publications (he did not reveal which one), about average reading times per mode. The result?

  • * Print (a standard magazine as published on paper) 60 minutes average reading
  • * Web (reading the magazine on a web site) about 5 minutes (ouch)
  • * iPhone client 55 minutes
  • * iPad 100 minutes

That’s right, according to Anderson, for this particular publication the iPad average reading exceeds the amount of time the magazine is read in print. By a lot.

The things that can be done on a tablet, and perhaps even just the physical form factor’s size and weight, seems to have an impact on attention span, and willingness to engage. Could this apply to survey design? Could we see a resurgence in mall intercepts? Even (gasp!) door-to-door research? Other on-site research? All fueled by tablets? Could we design surveys with more media stimuli, more questions, if participants are more engaged?

3. Emerging Challenges for Social Media Research
Sentiment monitoring requires web scraping, and that depends on access to content. What happens if, indeed, the web is dead? If more real user behavior and chatter moves to the walled gardens from which sentiment monitoring tools are blocked? (For example, Google can’t see into Facebook discussions). If more premium content moves to closed systems, the very concept of being able to measure customer sentiment by monitoring consumer behavior and commentary online becomes challenged, does it not?

4. A New Form for Research Reports
Wired Magazine is selling an average of 30,000 iPad subscriptions a month. They are using the new device to totally redefine what a magazine is. Anderson invoked the image of Harry Potter’s wizarding newspaper, the Daily Prophet’where images and text move and seem alive. A magazine can now include animation, audio, video, social interactivity and so on.

So maybe that can also be true for market research reports? I remember years ago (and I do mean years) when most research reports were written (for you youngsters, that means as in a Word document instead of a PowerPoint or Keynote file). We all moved to PowerPoint as it became so easy to create visually compelling content in graphic form. All of the data could realistically be illustrated as charts and graphs. And soon followed the demise of the written research report.

Perhaps with tablets, we’ll see another massive change? Multimedia reports that balance the logical flow of the written word with the compelling visual impact of graphs, videos and animation? That can tie into team interactivity for shared highlighting of key points? Would our report reading times also nearly double? And wouldn’t that be amazing?

Thanks to Chris Anderson’s talk, I easily identified four potential changes for market research. And while on a deadline! I am sure there are many more. What ones can you add?

[Are you at TMRE? I have 5 copies of my book, 'How to Hire and Manage Market Research Agencies' to give away. Normally available on Amazon for $17. Just stop me and ask!]

A Look Back at TMRE 2009: TMRE Keynote 2009: Crowdsourcing: Unleashing the Power of Crowds to Unveil Rich Insights

The Market Research Event 2010 is taking place this November 8-10, 2010 in San Diego, California. Every Friday leading up to the event, we’ll be recapping one session from The Market Research Event 2009.

TMRE Keynote 2009: Crowdsourcing: Unleashing the Power of Crowds to Unveil Rich Insights

Crowdsourcing: Unleashing the Power of Crowds to Unveil Rich Insights
Jeff Howe, Author, Crowdsourcing


In 2005, Jeff Howe sent a story about MySpace to the Village Voice. MySpace had created a culture with musicians, which lead Jeff Howe to follow the Warped Tour to write a column for Wired Magazine. The Tour is about the music, but features a carnival culture. The Warped Tour kids engaged in amazing creativity throughout a summer tour of 30 bands traveling and playing in a different city every day. They published poetry, web design, paintings. None of the kids defined themselves as one certain thing like “musician” or “artist”. The technology was not the story on the tour, it was what they could do with the technology. Their emphasis was on the products and the processes and how they released their creativity.

When Howe wrote this article, the public’s obsession for user generated content was immense, but he realized that people were missing was the larger tectonic shift, which were the underlying dynamics of different shapes and sizes and reality. Howe needed something that would capture not just the media, but all industries. He wanted to find a way to outsource to the crowd. The column, Crowdsoucing, was first published in June 2006. It came into use first with technology, but then branched out. There was a fundamental shift beneath the surface between consumers and producers.

Crowdsourcing was not a strategy designed by academics, instead it was an accident. Two friends came together and created a shirt design business, the designs were voted on by the Internet users. This way, you don’t have to be a designer to be a part of the system, but just like designs. Threadless came about this way. You have to give users tasks that take less than a minute to accomplish. They started this business because they loved people and wanted to share it with other users. It’s a global community, and the shirts are sold to individuals around the world.

A key to Threadless was they get free marketing. Via street teams, users posting images of their shirts, in addition to personal designs from the users. They also see what consumers want. They have an ‘I’d Buy It’ box. They know which shirts will sell. They’ve never had overstock or sold out due to this function.

Another example: stock photos. This is a photo that’s already been commissioned by a person to take, then same photo over and over again for promotional purposes. The creator opened his own site where he uploaded his stock photos, and let others download them as long as they uploaded their own. This popular service exceeded what he could pay to. Bruce charged people to post images, and others began to realize the the value. You could download a picture for $300 or $.25. The model worked. Today it’s known as Getty Images.

The Cardinal Rule of Crowdsoucing is: Ask not what your community can do for you ‘ Ask what You Can Do For Your Community.

One member of the audience posed the question “How can businesses build their own communities to create these items?” Howe responded communities came together because they were being offered something, the crowd was being offered something. For example, if you are a grocery store, give the community a way to see if you have things in stock, give them specific coupons that apply to your users, etc.

TMRE Keynote 2009: Crowdsourcing: Unleashing the Power of Crowds to Unveil Rich Insights

Crowdsourcing: Unleashing the Power of Crowds to Unveil Rich Insights
Jeff Howe, Author, Crowdsourcing


In 2005, Jeff Howe sent a story about MySpace to the Village Voice. MySpace had created a culture with musicians, which lead Jeff Howe to follow the Warped Tour to write a column for Wired Magazine. The Tour is about the music, but features a carnival culture. The Warped Tour kids engaged in amazing creativity throughout a summer tour of 30 bands traveling and playing in a different city every day. They published poetry, web design, paintings. None of the kids defined themselves as one certain thing like “musician” or “artist”. The technology was not the story on the tour, it was what they could do with the technology. Their emphasis was on the products and the processes and how they released their creativity.

When Howe wrote this article, the public’s obsession for user generated content was immense, but he realized that people were missing was the larger tectonic shift, which were the underlying dynamics of different shapes and sizes and reality. Howe needed something that would capture not just the media, but all industries. He wanted to find a way to outsource to the crowd. The column, Crowdsoucing, was first published in June 2006. It came into use first with technology, but then branched out. There was a fundamental shift beneath the surface between consumers and producers.

Crowdsourcing was not a strategy designed by academics, instead it was an accident. Two friends came together and created a shirt design business, the designs were voted on by the Internet users. This way, you don’t have to be a designer to be a part of the system, but just like designs. Threadless came about this way. You have to give users tasks that take less than a minute to accomplish. They started this business because they loved people and wanted to share it with other users. It’s a global community, and the shirts are sold to individuals around the world.

A key to Threadless was they get free marketing. Via street teams, users posting images of their shirts, in addition to personal designs from the users. They also see what consumers want. They have an ‘I’d Buy It’ box. They know which shirts will sell. They’ve never had overstock or sold out due to this function.

Another example: stock photos. This is a photo that’s already been commissioned by a person to take, then same photo over and over again for promotional purposes. The creator opened his own site where he uploaded his stock photos, and let others download them as long as they uploaded their own. This popular service exceeded what he could pay to. Bruce charged people to post images, and others began to realize the the value. You could download a picture for $300 or $.25. The model worked. Today it’s known as Getty Images.

The Cardinal Rule of Crowdsoucing is: Ask not what your community can do for you ‘ Ask what You Can Do For Your Community.

One member of the audience posed the question “How can businesses build their own communities to create these items?” Howe responded communities came together because they were being offered something, the crowd was being offered something. For example, if you are a grocery store, give the community a way to see if you have things in stock, give them specific coupons that apply to your users, etc.

Speaker Profile: Jeff Howe

Jeff Howe will be a keynote speaker at this year’s The Market Research Event. Jeff Howe is a contributing editor at Wired Magazine, where he covers the media and entertainment industry,among other subjects. In June of 2006 he published “The Rise of Crowdsourcing” in Wired. He has continued to cover the phenomenon in his blog, crowdsourcing.com, and in August 2008 Crown Business published Crowdsourcing: Why the Power of the Crowd Is Driving the Future of Business. Before coming to Wired he was a senior editor at Inside.com and a writer at the Village Voice. In his fifteen years as a journalist he has traveled around the world working.

Read Jeff’s blog here: http://crowdsourcing.typepad.com/

Source: Bright Sight Group