Tag Archives: United Kingdom

Answering the Call of the Omnichannel Shopper through a Dynamic Category Strategy

This afternoon at OmniShopper International 205 in Paris,
France, Duncan Tyrrell, Category Strategy Controller at Warburtons Limited
talked to us about reaching omnichannel shoppers through a dynamic category strategy.
We are in a time of transitional change in grocery. This
could be an inflection point for the industry, according to Tyrell.
There has been a shift of control from the retailers into
the hands of the shoppers. The source of omnichannel shopping comes from three
places: societal change, technology revolution, and new business models. The way
the societal change is manifesting itself is the way of the main shop is changing
and diminishing in size.  ‘Little and
often is becoming the norm,’ said Tyrrell.
In the next 5 years, super stores will become less popular
and the growth will be in convenience stores and online. For example, large stores
like Tesco are buying a successful smaller store called Giraffe in the UK.
Warburtons translated the omni shopper change into action in
order to adapt to that market. The company learned to understand their
omnichannel environment to unlock category growth by implementing the following
strategies:
1.      
Provide a language for internal alignment
2.      
New Opportunities for thought leadership
3.      
A common purpose for retailers and suppliers
Now, Warburtons retailers in the UK are looking for a path
to growth because they need new and disruptive business models in the market.
Tyrrell said, ‘We will look back on this time and realize it
was around this time that things really began to change.’

About the Author:
Amanda Ciccatelli is a Social Media Strategist at IIR USA where she manages social marketing
strategy and content marketing across the business. She a background in digital
and print journalism, covering a variety of topics in business strategy, life
sciences, innovation, law, marketing, and technology. Amanda is the Editor at
Large for several of IIR’s blogs including Next Big Design,  Front End of Innovation and The Market Research Blogs.
She previously worked at Technology Marketing Corporation as a Web Editor where
she covered breaking news and feature stories in the technology industry. She
can be reached at aciccatelli@iirusa.com. Follow her at @AmandaCicc. 

What actually happens along the Shopper Decision Journey [Webinar Link Inside]

If shopper marketing is about influencing shoppers at the point of purchase decision, how much do we really know about how and where shoppers make decisions?

Our learning is increasing all of the time and we actually know quite a lot as an industry, but for some reason we often seem to forget or ignore everything we know when we try to influence shoppers.

In fact, a huge amount of money, especially if price discounts are being taken into account, is being spent often in ways that may neither help or be damaging to the brand.

We’ll explain what happens along the Shopper Decision Journey and give key insights into why their behaviour is not always what you want during our upcoming Webinar, Shoppers Behaving Badly.

This presentations looks at:

  • how shoppers really make decisions
  • the implications for shopper marketing
  • and how to drive a return on investment

When: Wed, Sep 24, 2014 at 10:00 AM EDT
Duration: 45 minutes includes Q&A

  —>>> Sign up here

  Speakers: 

  • Kirstie Hawkes, Director & Consumer and Shopper Lead, Kantar Retail Europe
  • Richard Tolley, Director & Consumer and Shopper Lead, Kantar Retail Europe
  • Lee Smith, Global Director, Retail and Shopper

Presented by Kantar Retail and the producers of the International Shopper Insights in Action Event, which unites over 250 of the most prominent retailers and FMCGs from across 35+ countries to share best practices (and next practices). Leading Researchers, Category Managers, Shopper Marketers, Merchandisers and Industry Experts attend to explore consumer and shopper behaviour, the decision journey and how to champion the value of activating intelligence for basket growth. We invite you to join us in Edinburgh this November and help build the future of retail together.

Why Do Shoppers Behave In Unexpected Ways? Webinar Invite

If shopper marketing is about influencing shoppers at the point of purchase decision, how much do we really know about how and where shoppers make decisions?

Our learning is increasing all of the time and we actually know quite a lot as an industry, but for some reason we often seem to forget or ignore everything we know when we try to influence shoppers.

In fact, a huge amount of money, especially if price discounts are being taken into account, is being spent often in ways that may neither help or be damaging to the brand.

We’ll explain what happens along the Shopper Decision Journey and give key insights into why their behaviour is not always what you want during our upcoming Webinar, Shoppers Behaving Badly.

This presentations looks at:

  • how shoppers really make decisions
  • the implications for shopper marketing
  • and how to drive a return on investment

When: Wed, Sep 24, 2014 at 10:00 AM EDT
Duration: 45 minutes includes Q&A

 
—>>> Sign up here

 
Speakers: 

  • Kirstie Hawkes, Director & Consumer and Shopper Lead, Kantar Retail Europe
  • Richard Tolley, Director & Consumer and Shopper Lead, Kantar Retail Europe
  • Lee Smith, Global Director, Retail and Shopper

Presented by Kantar Retail and the producers of the International Shopper Insights in Action Event, which unites over 250 of the most prominent retailers and FMCGs from across 35+ countries to share best practices (and next practices). Leading Researchers, Category Managers, Shopper Marketers, Merchandisers and Industry Experts attend to explore consumer and shopper behaviour, the decision journey and how to champion the value of activating intelligence for basket growth. We invite you to join us in Edinburgh this November and help build the future of retail together.

How Can Social Analytics Help Provide Global Insights for Media and Entertainment?

TV shows have always spread internationally – especially between USA and UK, but never has more data been available to help compare how they are received by consumers across different countries.

Today, social data and analytics can help review UK reactions to Walking dead, House of cards and even Netflix entry into the UK vs local player LoveFilm.

Are these brands received as enthusiastically in the UK as they were in the US?

Join a complimentary webinar on Wednesday, July 23, 2014 at 1:00 PM EST with presenter Pernille Bruun-Jensen, NetBase CMO, to learn more about how Social analytics can help provide global insights for media and entertainment going forward.

Plus see the Netflix LIVE Pulse’ for Brand and hear how you can monitor your brand in real-time,too.

Pernille is a well-rounded international business professional and operator who has lived and worked around the world, and who ‘gets the challenges of brands. She led the dramatic turn-around of Intuit’s UK operation as General Manager and Global CMO, delivering double digit growth on all dimensions, and winning #1 Best Small Workplace. She has extensive CPG experience from J&J and Kraft/General Foods.

Register for The Consumer Reaction of TV Shows Going Global – Illustrated via Social Analytics webinar today: http://bit.ly/1sf7yP7

Plus, do you want to hear more on this topic? Attend The Media Insights & Engagement Conference in San Diego, CA February 3-5, 2015. This event explores new opportunities with insights-rich decision making.

Examples of online communities in the not-for-profit sector

A busy week at FreshNetworks has meant that we’re a little later than expected bringing you the third in our series of Online Community Examples. After looking at examples in the retail and automotive industries, this week we are looking at examples from the not-for-profit sector.

Online communities in the not-for-profit sector

There are many great example of not-for-profits using social media and it is sometimes the case that this sector can be more innovative than the private sector. There are many reasons for this: the financial pressures are different, there is a real need to engage people in an issue, topic or theme rather than enter into a transactional relationship with them, and this is a sector where innovation has always been important. (A great resource for information on not-for-profits and social media is Steve Bridger‘s nfp 2.0 blog) We’re written before about some great examples in this space, from the well-documented role of online communities in the Obama campaign, to Oxfam’s use of social media in the UK. Here we look at three examples that from across the not-for-profit space, from government departments to charities and association.

The US Navy’s Navy For Moms

Navy For Moms is an online community for mothers whose children have joined or are thinking of joining the US Navy. Launched in 2008, the site has over 13,000 members – moms (and some dads) who are sharing their hopes and fears, supporting each other and getting advice from others in the same situation as them. They can share photos and videos, join discussions and regional (or State-wide) groups and learn and gain support from people who have been there before. The community is, as you might expect, very vibrant and is clearly managed both by the official community manager, but also by obvious community leaders across the site. This site is a classic case of an online community – the members share a common experience and are connected not because they know each other but because of this common bond. This makes it very easy for the community to grow – people can join even if they don’t know others because the community is built around ideas and experience not previous connections. It is also easy for each new member to add value to the others – everybody brings their own experiences and can advise and support others. One sign of a well-managed community is that people are quickly assimilated and feel comfortable talking about their thoughts, ideas and experiences. They share their hopes and fears and ask for and trust the expertise they are getting from others. This is all very evident in the forums and discussions where people are sharing advice on topics from the emotional process of deployment to the roles in the Navy for those who are colour-blind, as well as sharing personal stories about their children. This is a great example of where online communities can offer a real resource and a real support to people even if they don’t know each other and are not close geographically. Online communities offering a real resource and service that would not have been possible in the same way offline.

American Association of Retired Persons’ Online Community

The American Association of Retired Persons (AARP) is a not-for-profit organisation dedicated to improving the lives of people over 50 in America. They are strong supporters of collaboration and helping their members to support each other, and the AARP online community is a clear manifestation of this. Within the AARP community, over 10,000 members connect to share information, provide and accept support and advice, discuss organisational goals and generally enjoy themselves. In this way, the online community spreads the AARP message and support through word-of-mouth. Reaching more people and growing the community and the support the members support each other. But the primary role of this online community is to allow the over 50s to meet and support each other, to find people with similar interests and discuss and share these interests with them The site performs a clear social function with a group that can find themselves sometimes isolated from friends and family. There is a clear and valuable role online communities can play here, supporting people but also allowing them to share their passions and hobbies with others. For the AARP, this kind of community has a very clear benefit. By providing a service, they are offering a real and immediate benefit to their members. And satisfied and united members mean an effective and engaged support base for your cause.

UK Fundraising’s Forums

Sometimes, simple can be best. It can be tempting to build a complicated online community with lots of social media tools when this doesn’t meet the needs of the organisation or of the members of this community. UK Fundraising is an example of site that is very successful, supporting those who work in the charitable sector with advice on fundraising – from best practice to legal advice and support on a regional level. For this kind of sharing expertise and discussing issues, a forum can be the best solution and this is what UK Fundraising does so well. They have a very vibrant and active forum as part of their broader community site – mixing the forum discussions with events, experts, training and news. The site combines the member discussions with these other services to create a portal that really adds value to those in charities and those tasked with fundraising. This site works well by providing a real service to its users. It is the place to go to for news and events, information on training as well as discussions and advice from others in a similar situation. It is often the case that users of your online community will not mind where the information comes from, they just want reliable and useful answers to their questions. This may be from other members, experts or editorial. It is the information that’s important and presenting everything in one space makes it easy for members to get access to this, wherever it comes from.From the FreshNetworks Blog See all our Online Community Examples Subscribe to updates from the FreshNetworks Blog

Social media diary 27/2/2009 – UK National Museums

Nine museums in the UK launch Creative Spaces

This week in the UK saw the beta launch of Creative Spaces. An online community and federated search project across nine National Museums, part of the National Museums Online Learning Project (NMOLP) and involving the Tate, V&A, British Museum, National Portrait Gallery, Natural History Museum, Imperial War Museum, Royal Armouries, Wallace Collection and Sir John Soanes’ Museum. The core idea is to provide a way for people to find, discuss and be inspired by the collections of all these museums.

The project really has two components:

  1. A federated search, allowing users to search and explore the collections across all nine museums in one place, online.
  2. An online community, allowing people to create notebooks (their own collections combining objects from the museums with their own content), create and join groups and review and add comments to objects that they like (or otherwise, of course).

It’s been an ambitious project, running for a number of years and the outcomes are exciting. The ability to search across and explore the collections is of huge value. But the social elements of the site allow individuals to essentially curate their own experience. Bringing objects from the different museums together with their own content, annotating them and making their own notebook – an exhibition for others to view and comment on.

So what can we learn from this?

This is a great example of using social media and online communities in a museums context. But it is also a great example of When thinking about how to use social media and online communities, it is important for brands and organisations to explore what it is they can uniquely offer. What do they have that they can share with people, and why would people come to a site that they were running to interact. With Creative Spaces, I think these nine museums have got it right. They have not just launched an online community, asking people to talk about art – there are many places you can do that. What these organisations can offer that is different is access to their catalogues, and by coming together to make Creative Spaces they are offering something even more unique – the ability to search the collective catalogues of some of the leading museums in the UK. They have something unique and of value that they can offer to people with this search, and also with the online community they have built to support this. One problem with some online communities is that they focus too much on forums and verbal communication. Other media can sometimes be a more effective way of communicating: video can be a great way to engage some people, others want to express themselves with images or objects. In a museums context this becomes even more important. I may not want to discuss my reaction to an object, but I might want to upload an image of my own as a reaction to it. Creative Spaces lets you do this, and indeed let’s you curate your own collection (they call it a notebook) with objects from the collections alongside your own content or content you’ve got from elsewhere. This is clever, allowing people to react and respond in whatever medium is most appropriate to them. Creative Spaces is a great idea, it brings social media to a museums context and creates a social experience online that centres on the unique content these museums have – their own collections. It’s easy to set up a site and expect people to come and engage there, but this rarely happens. You need to build a site that meets a need and offers something new, leveraging your own position to give a real reason for people to come and engage on your site rather than elsewhere. If you decide to join up, feel free to add me as a contact: Matt Rhodes. (In interest of open disclosure, I should say that FreshNetworks has done some strategy work with the NMOLP to help them launch and grow Creative Spaces. But it would always have been a great example of social media!)From the FreshNetworks Blog
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Social media diary 5/12/2008 – Orange

Orange launches ‘Film Club’ online community

I’m a big fan of mobile operator Orange‘s involvement with film and cinemas in the UK – from their amusing adverts in cinemas (including this with Rob Lowe) to their Orange Wednesdays offer where Orange customers can take a friend to the cinema for free. To date they haven’t formally used social media to engage people around their film associations, but this week they launched The Film Club. In Facebook and Bebo, this ‘club’ is actually an application that gives users access to free preview screenings, exclusive competitions, trailers, reviews and other film related content. The Club also lets you see which of your friends are taking advantage of the Orange Wednesdays offer, and if you’re not an Orange customer you can poke your friends who are and ask them to take you. For Orange this move is all about capitalising upon their association with film and being seen as providing a place for people to share this passion with them. As Spencer McHugh, head of brand communications at Orange, says:

The new Film Club communities give movie fans on Facebook and Bebo a place to come together and chat about the things they love most.

So what can we learn from this?

At FreshNetworks we talk a lot, and have indeed posted a lot in the past, about the difference between online communities and social networks and about how building a community online is as much about building an actual community of people as it is about doing it online. What Orange have done with their Orange Film Club is to cleverly and astutely leverage social networks (in this case Facebook and Bebo) to help connect their users and act as a portal for all their film-related content and activities. But building a true community in these social networks is notoriously difficult for a brand to do. People invariably spend time in social networks for very self-centred issues – it’s a ‘me’ place where I upload my photos, plan my events, talk to my friends and join groups that reflect me. From this angle it is clearly a great place for Orange to bring together all of its members who engage with it on film – taking advantage of their offers or watching their content. This one-to-one relationship between Orange and individual fans or customers will continue. Building a real community, where it is these fans who also grow the discussions and content and where they talk to each other and form bonds might prove more difficult. A community tends to have a common purpose or something they are all contributing to, it tends to have no leaders but everybody (brand and fans alike) being equal members) and it needs careful design and guidance to make it grow and flourish (a bit like a garden can grow on its own but needs a gardener to look at its best). In Facebook (or any social networks) it’s difficult to do the latter and as a very public space people are often unwilling to start discussions and build that real community feel. So if Orange wanted to build and grow a large and flourishing film community, they may find doing it in Facebook or Bebo hard. If, on the other hand, they want to bring together all their activities and fans in this space into a convenient place then things will be much easier to do. I suspect this is what they want – making it easier for both parties to find content and engage on film. However, I hope this is the precursor to something. I hope they are planning an online community here. It could be great, and their brand could really help it to work – online and on the go.From the FreshNetworks Blog
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