Tag Archives: twitter

Image Recognition and the Future of Digital Analytics

This post was originally
published
on Kelton Global’s Blog.

The days of text-centric social feeds are officially long
gone. A whopping 1.8 billion images are uploaded to the Internet daily
and of those, 350 million are shared on Facebook. Instagram recently
surpassed 500 million active users, and Snapchat now has more active users than Twitter. The content that flows
into our social feeds is more heavily optimized than ever to deliver more of
what people want’less text and more visuals.
Brands have adapted their social content strategies
accordingly by delivering more visually immersive experiences. And while we’re
seeing significant shifts in branded content, this influx of visual content has
yet to herald a commensurate change in social analytics. Accordingly, few gains
have been made to measure and derive insights from the contents of images or
video. Social listening has historically focused on the challenges of text-based
analysis’specifically, the challenge of determining the context and meaning
behind posts. But as social media habits evolve, it’s clear that deriving
insights from pictures is an increasingly important aspect of understanding
consumers. That’s where image recognition comes into play.
Brands have adapted
their social content strategies accordingly by delivering more visually
immersive experiences.

Simply put, image recognition is the process of translating
images to data. Photos and images can reveal a wealth of data
points’demographics, purchases, personalities, and behaviors (just to name a
few). Through next generation image recognition, a mere selfie may reveal a
person’s gender, approximate age, location disposition, and even the clothing
brands that the person is wearing. As text-centric media takes a backseat to
image and video, the opportunity to understand the contents of these formats
grows. These insights represent a veritable treasure trove of actionable data
for brands.
Tools that analyze image and video-based content are still
in development, but increased investment in research is already impacting
commercial products and how they’re advertised. One example is brand logo
recognition’scanning images for brand logos, and flagging them with the
corresponding brand names. This tool is especially powerful considering that 80% of photos shared online depict a brand logo but don’t
explicitly call out the brand’s name.
 This fact points to a sizable
opportunity for companies to measure and understand the impact of these formerly
inaccessible data points.
Photos and images can
reveal a wealth of data points’demographics, purchases, personalities, and
behaviors (just to name a few).

As an example of how this applies to brands, Kelton’s
Digital Analytics team took a look at the scores of backyard BBQ photos that
flooded public forums, blogs, and social feeds over the recent 4th of July
holiday. We experimented to see which of two quintessentially American beverage
brands’Coca-Cola and Budweiser’netted more published images of
patriotically-themed bottles and cans (as well as other forms of branding) on
social media.

In the end, Coca-Cola branding was twice as prominent as
Budweiser’s. We found that Coke bottles and cans popped up in more diverse
settings such as public parks and inside motor vehicles, whereas Budweiser was
predominantly found in bars and house parties. Coke also aroused greater
sentiment around the theme of Americana, as many consumers
photographed vintage Coca-Cola gear and opted for bottles over cans. This might
explain why Coke captured a significantly greater share of social mentions than
Budweiser.
This example illustrates several ways that brands can
leverage image recognition technology to build actionable insights:
??        
Ethnographic data ‘ Identify where, when
and how often brands are showing up in people’s lives.
??        
Updated brand health analysis ‘ We now have
a more comprehensive point of view of brands’ online footprint.
??        
Sponsorship and Branding ROI ‘ Extend the
value of branding and sponsorships shared via online news, blogs and social
media through a multiplier effect.
??        
Influencer identification ‘ Find authentic
brand advocates who consume and spotlight your merchandise.
??        
Misuse use of brand iconography ‘ Surface
content that depicts improper usage of brand’s logo or other creative assets.

In today’s ever-shifting social media landscape, it’s never
been more important for brands and their partners to stay aware of the new and
emerging capabilities that can help better understand consumers’ behavior
online. Image recognition is just the beginning. From AI startups to instant
objection recognition devices
, the mobilization and fusion of research,
tech, and capital is quickly reshaping the way we think about analytics. These
new tools will add even more contextual understanding to sentiment on social
platforms, empowering brands to understand consumers like never before.

Sleep Loss in Teens Linked to Social Media

by Yamilex Batista

In this generation, teenagers are becoming so addicted and
obsessed with social media that it can potentially affect their ability to
focus in school. Instead of getting nine hours of sleep, most teenagers
dedicate their time to use social media during the night.
According to a recent article in Media Post, ‘Sleep
Loss in Teens Linked to Social Media
,’ a survey from the Wales Institute
for social & Economic Research revealed that one-fifth of 900 students,
ages 12 to 15 years old, reported to ‘almost always’ waking up during the
night. Moreover, the study found that teenage females were more likely to use
social media more often than teenage males during the night time. This
emphasizes that teenagers are developing a sleep disorder because of
uncontrollable social media use. As a result of this sleepless pattern,
students tend to feel tired and less motivated during class time, which negatively
affects their academic performance.
The article also links social media to sleep disruption by
referring to the study at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine.
However, this survey aimed to target adults ages 19 to 32 within the United
States instead of middle school teenagers. Out of 1,788 adults surveyed in the
study about 30% pointed out to experience sleep disturbance. The study also
pointed out that adults who were constantly using social media tended to feel
three times more tired, compared to adults who use social media at a lower
rate.
However, studies in an article from the Medical Daily, ‘Sleep
and Social Media: New Study Finds Link Between Facebook Use and Lack of Sleep
,’
aim to indicate people tend to check social media late at night as a result of
a previous sleep disturbance. The research demonstrated that sleep disruption does
not arise from social media use during the night. The study revealed that the
use of social media during the night is increasing because students tend to use
it to control their disrupted sleep schedules. Students believe that using
Facebook during the night might help them fall asleep faster. At the same time,
students developed the habit of constantly checking social media pages or
Facebook to stay informed and to relax their mind.
Overall, this research reveals one of the many outcomes and
factors contributing to uncontrollable social
media
use. Young people in the U.S. are devoted to spending most of their
time on social media, instead of focusing in school and the real-world
environment. High use of social media or Facebook can cause sleep disruption,
but at the same time, the lack of sleep can influence to the use of social
media.
About the Author: Yamilex is currently a Marketing Intern at
Knect365 where she assists in social media research & management, blog
writing, and various marketing tasks. She is also a student at the Renaissance
Charter High School for Innovation. She hopes to attend the University
Pennsylvania or Boston College to major in communications with integrated
marketing.

Image Recognition and the Future of Digital Analytics

This post was
originally published on the Kelton
Global Blog
.

The days of text-centric social feeds are officially long
gone. A whopping 1.8 billion images are uploaded to the Internet daily
and of those, 350 million are shared on Facebook. Instagram recently
surpassed 500 million active users, and Snapchat now has more active users than Twitter. The content that flows
into our social feeds is more heavily optimized than ever to deliver more of
what people want’less text and more visuals.
Brands have adapted their social content strategies
accordingly by delivering more visually immersive experiences. And while we’re
seeing significant shifts in branded content, this influx of visual content has
yet to herald a commensurate change in social analytics. Accordingly, few gains
have been made to measure and derive insights from the contents of images or
video. Social listening has historically focused on the challenges of
text-based analysis’specifically, the challenge of determining the context and
meaning behind posts. But as social media habits evolve, it’s clear that deriving
insights from pictures is an increasingly important aspect of understanding
consumers. That’s where image recognition comes into play.
Brands have adapted their social content strategies
accordingly by delivering more visually immersive experiences.
Simply put, image recognition is the process of translating
images to data. Photos and images can reveal a wealth of data
points’demographics, purchases, personalities, and behaviors (just to name a
few). Through next generation image recognition, a mere selfie may reveal a
person’s gender, approximate age, location disposition, and even the clothing
brands that the person is wearing. As text-centric media takes a backseat to
image and video, the opportunity to understand the contents of these formats
grows. These insights represent a veritable treasure trove of actionable data
for brands.
Tools that analyze image and video-based content are still
in development, but increased investment in research is already impacting
commercial products and how they’re advertised. One example is brand logo
recognition’scanning images for brand logos, and flagging them with the
corresponding brand names. This tool is especially powerful considering that 80% of photos shared online depict a brand logo but don’t
explicitly call out the brand’s name.
 This fact points to a sizable
opportunity for companies to measure and understand the impact of these
formerly inaccessible data points.
Photos and images can reveal a wealth of data
points’demographics, purchases, personalities, and behaviors (just to name a
few).
As an example of how this applies to brands, Kelton’s
Digital Analytics team took a look at the scores of backyard BBQ photos that
flooded public forums, blogs, and social feeds over the recent 4th of July
holiday. We experimented to see which of two quintessentially American beverage
brands’Coca-Cola and Budweiser’netted more published images of
patriotically-themed bottles and cans (as well as other forms of branding) on
social media.

In the end, Coca-Cola branding was twice as prominent as
Budweiser’s. We found that Coke bottles and cans popped up in more diverse
settings such as public parks and inside motor vehicles, whereas Budweiser was
predominantly found in bars and house parties. Coke also aroused greater
sentiment around the theme of Americana, as many consumers
photographed vintage Coca-Cola gear and opted for bottles over cans. This might
explain why Coke captured a significantly greater share of social mentions than
Budweiser.
This example illustrates several ways that brands can
leverage image recognition technology to build actionable insights:
??        
Ethnographic data ‘ Identify where, when
and how often brands are showing up in people’s lives.
??        
Updated brand health analysis ‘ We now have
a more comprehensive point of view of brands’ online footprint.
??        
Sponsorship and Branding ROI ‘ Extend the
value of branding and sponsorships shared via online news, blogs and social
media through a multiplier effect.
??        
Influencer identification ‘ Find authentic
brand advocates who consume and spotlight your merchandise.
??        
Misuse use of brand iconography ‘ Surface
content that depicts improper usage of brand’s logo or other creative assets.

In today’s ever-shifting social media landscape, it’s never
been more important for brands and their partners to stay aware of the new and
emerging capabilities that can help better understand consumers’ behavior
online. Image recognition is just the beginning. From AI startups to instant
objection recognition devices
, the mobilization and fusion of research,
tech, and capital is quickly reshaping the way we think about analytics. These
new tools will add even more contextual understanding to sentiment on social
platforms, empowering brands to understand consumers like never before.

Agenda Premiere: The Media Insights & Engagement Conference Full Program Release

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ultra-fragmented media environment?
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the specific tools you need to captivate today’s connected consumer.

Learn how cutting edge media executives (from Bravo, ESPN, Buzzfeed, Twitter,
Viacom, AMC Networks and more) are re-imagining the future of television as
they share unbiased insights for:

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methodologies, and
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Utilizing data to drive engagement
Download the brochure
for full program details:
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Save $100 when you
use LinkedIn discount code MEDIA16LI. Buy tickets here:
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Cheers,
The Media Insights & Engagement Conference Team
@_MediaFusion
#MediaInsights
Themarketresearcheventblog.iirusa.com

P.S. Don’t forget to subscribe to our insights newsletter
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changemaker. 

6 Tips Marketing Researchers Can Learn From Social Media

This post was
originally published on Lightspeed
GMI’s blog
.

Social media has caused a massive shift in the way people
communicate, interact and share experiences and personal interests. Consumers
are always on, always connected. Consumers build unique online relationships;
they are connected to brands, athletes, teams, family, friends and co-workers
on multiple channels. Sharing everything from political views to favorite
products, social media users are leaking valuable information and insights for
researchers to take advantage of.

Marketing researchers have adapted Mobile
First best practices
; but are we also looking to benefit from the same
openness and flexibility that social media platforms have to offer? There are
six ways to successfully engage and capture relevant and actionable
feedback from your panelists based on social media best practices:
1.      
Focus on
people, not metrics: Our
industry refers to panelists, not people. Are
we focusing on why individuals are dropping out of surveys? Are we worried
about their enjoyment of a survey or just survey completes? Create consumer
conversations, not metrics.  
2.      
Stay
authentic: 
According
to Digital Stats, 92% of consumers say they trust earned media like personal
recommendations above other forms of advertising.
 Authentic brands do
better on social media, but trust is earned over time. If you want to capture
genuine consumer insights, treat your online survey as you would a social media
account. Be honest and upfront about your intent.
3.      
Engage,
don’t push:
 Want to get better research? Consider the way you are
asking questions. Similiar to social media posts, consumers favor shorter,
visually appealing surveys with a strong narrative structure.Engage
your respondents first, ask questions later.
4.      
Let the
consumer decide:
video, text or photo? Social media platforms are
constantly evolving, but they always remain focused on consumer adoption. According
to Spinklr, marketers need to find new ways to capture the attention of the
consumer who has seen just about everything
. Every day, more and more
individuals are starting surveys on their mobile devices over PCs. They are
deciding when and what device to take the survey; why not let them decide on
the format? We design for cross-device research, so why not design
cross-format?
5.      
Be
relevant: 
Across Facebook, Twitter and Instagram, you want to reach
your target audience with relevant content ‘ photos, posts and videos. Like
social media, marketing research is a crowded space; panelists are flooded with
survey invites daily. Be relevant: ask
the right questions, in the right sequence to the right audience.
6.      
Interactions
first, technology second:
 Social media planning 101 = interactions
first, channel second. Allow your panelists, not technology, to drive the
future of the industry. Are marketing researchers allowing technology to
dictate the future or panelists? Are you focused on building mobile research
apps or consumer feedback apps?
Gaining success in social media isn’t easy; it’s a process,
a way of thinking. Social media can be used to create and collect customer
intelligence through listening techniques. And this can also ring true in the
online survey world. Think about it: Brands have the capacity to cultivate
conversations with consumers…but often don’t. Researchers who are successful
in gaining insights from surveys are the ones who allow the consumer to take
the wheel and drive how marketers can collect information from them. Platforms
such as Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Pinterest and Instagram allow users to be
creative and communicate in whatever method is enjoyable to them.  Why not
allow online panelists that same freedom? By allowing panelists to communicate
with you through mediums that are most enjoyable to them, through video for
example, you could garner more authentic and elaborate feedback. Rather than
force tedious or possibly challenging lengthy open text responses, try allowing
an option for using text or video responses. Instead of requiring respondents
to rate a product on a variety of features through a MaxDiff exercise, try
engaging them in conversation through communities or discussion boards.

The perfect solution for the survey world isn’t available in
140 characters or less, unfortunately. But the successes of social media are
ours to grow from.

IBM’s James Newswanger on The Power of Twitter Data for Corporate Decision Making

Late last year IBM entered into a partnership with Twitter which their Senior Research Manager, Corporate Social Analytics James Newswanger describes as combining “the best of Twitter with the best of IBM”.  The Research Insighter sat down with Newswanger and asked him for an update on what sort of data and research IBM was working on with Twitter. Here’s a brief excerpt from the video interview, which you can watch in its entirety here.
 
James Newswanger first explained to The Research Insighter what IBM’s partnership with Twitter entails. “They give us full firehose access. We apply IBM’s Deep Insight through Watson computing analysis to help them find more meaning in their data.”
 
The Research Insighter: “What kinds of information are you looking for?”
 
Twitter analysis is “much more than 140 characters”
 
James Newswanger: “Past the 140 character text there are 150 metadata elements that tell you info about the Tweeter. You can find out how many followers the person, organization or in some cases spam has. This is extremely useful in identifying people who are most influential; it’s also used to identify spam.”

Newswanger discusses IBM’s own internal usage of Twitter data

James Newswanger: “In one quarter we get 500K tweets that mention IBM that need to be analyzed. Some of it is spam about products we are no longer making, some if it is robotic churn when people use #IBM in their Tweets to get attention. You have to clean data before you start analysis.”  

With a clean data set it’s easier to determine the story

Newswanger continued: “Once the data set is cleaned, you have to determine what is the purpose of the engagement. If we’re looking to identify influencers, we’ll be paying attention who is followed, who are they following. You also want to identify what keywords are being used in association with your key interest ‘ say it’s IBM for example.”

The Research Insighter: “Is there any other data that you’re looking for?”

James Newswanger: “Location. Knowing where a person is proving to be extremely useful. The amount of posts a person makes. The amount of activity they do, the amount of retweeting a person does indicative of their activity. We look at their description. That’s very interesting when we get into personality analysis.”

Twitter analysis is not just for marketing and brand equity anymore

The Research Insighter: “IBM recently issued an Institute for Business Value report called Beyond Listening. Can you tell us a little about it.”

James Newswanger: “It attempts to take a step forward past text analysis for marketing and brand analysis only. Social business analysis has moved into the fundamental operations of a firm and to some extent the strategy making of a firm. Things like supply chain, HR, every element of a firm now can figure out a way to use social. We give examples of how different companies are using Twitter to unearth a different level of business analysis. That’s proven to be particularly valuable to the C-Suite.”

The Research Insighter: “How would that work? Do you have any examples?”

James Newswanger: “Here are two of the most interesting examples:

Influencer identification. Many people use Twitter analysis to identify who they choose (or who they won’t choose) to be a product endorser. People also use Twitter information to decide who to invite (or not invite) to events as advocates.

Most companies sponsor events where they specifically target some people who are active socially. You see this a lot in fashion. In addition to a traditional magazine editor, you’ll see a whole barrage of bloggers and Twitter folks assigned to the front row because they’ve become important.

Supply chain. The other area that’s particulary interesting is supply chain. Companies are using Twitter to identify where people are, supplying things that are relevant to their inventory. For example, right now, the flu. If people tweet about being sick, colds or ‘where should I run to the store to get a cold medicine’.”

We’re excited to say that James Newswanger will be speaking at The Market Research event, and on a very timely topic: “Town Hall: The State of Election Polling”.

If you’re interested in hearing more from IBM and other technological innovators in the market research industry, don’t miss the world’s leading market research event TMRE happening in beautiful Boca Raton, Florida October 17-20. Got any comments on this blog? Make yourself heard – Tweet to us at @TMRE!

How Customer Service Boosts Your Marketing Strategy

Wayne Y. Huang

Businesses often struggle to understand what their customers are really thinking. During the Marketing Analytics & Data Science Conference, Wayne Y. Huang, Senior Research Lead, Twitter, presented “Measuring the Value of Customer Service for Brands.”

Wayne started the discussion with these insightful statistics:
- 80% of social customer service requests come from Twitter.
- 79% of customers are not receiving responses from brands.
- 87% who do get a response feel more positively towards the brand.

He talked about the pitfalls of relying on self-reported surveys when conducting customer research and then detailed a novel experiment he ran on Twitter using a conjoint survey to test how a good (or bad) customer service experience from a brand affects the customer’s future decision-making process.

A conjoint analysis is a survey technique and model used to measure preferences for products and services. Consumers’ overall value or “utility” for a product is a weighted sum of the value of each of its parts (The whole is the sum of its parts.). Its name comes from “considered jointly” because it almost always involves a comparison of multiple product or service options.

For this experiment, he found thousands of users who had a customer service interaction with an airline on Twitter in the past six months and used the data to quantify’ in dollar terms’ how the customer changed their behavior after those positive interactions. 

In the conjoint survey, consumers who in the past six months received a response from an airline via Twitter were the test group and those who had no interaction were the control group.


Twitter asked consumers to choose from three airplane ticket options that included this information: the airline, seat location, percentage of on-time arrival, and price. To determine the customers’ willingness to pay, Twitter ran a Hierarchical Bayesian regression which calculates a “utility” for all attributes for all respondents. A larger utility indicates a greater preference.

The research findings showed that:
- Consumers absolutely do remember good and bad customer service experiences (up to six months!).
- Consumers are willing to pay more after a good customer experience (up to $20 more).

Wayne’s research shows how social media is transforming the way consumers interact with brands and how customer service matters more than you think.

Watch for additional #MADSCONF follow-up stories!

Peggy L. Bieniek, ABC is an Accredited Business Communicator specializing in corporate communication best practices. 

Connect with Peggy on LinkedInTwitterGoogle+, and on her website at www.starrybluebrilliance.com

Customer Service Matters More than You Think

Wayne Huang

Wayne Huang is a Research Manager at Twitter. He’s also a presenter at the Marketing Analytics & Data Science Conference on June 8-10, 2016 in San Francisco, California.

As a preview to his presentation ‘Mo’ Problems, Mo’ Money: Customer Service Matters More than You Think,’ Wayne shared insights on how social media is transforming the way consumers interact with brands.

Peggy L. Bieniek, ABC: How does Twitter help to shape the future of online social media?
Wayne Huang:  As someone with a background in both engineering and in social science, what I find most interesting about Twitter is how it has completely upended the way we communicate.
We’re used to jumping through hoops to talk to a human being at a company. It’s nearly impossible these days to find the phone number of the company you’re trying to reach. But, what strikes me most about Twitter is that brands actually proactively engage in conversations with customers, and not hide behind a maze of automated phone menus.
One of my most memorable Twitter experiences was when I once tweeted a question to Virgin Atlantic, and they responded to my tweet in less than three seconds. That was an incredible interaction that I’ll always remember. It’s a leveling of the playing field between big companies and consumers that wouldn’t have happened without social media.

PB: How does Twitter data help tell a marketing story?
WH: Twitter is an incredibly rich source of data. Every day, close to half a billion tweets are sent. Search for any topic, and I guarantee you’ll find someone tweeting about it.
For brands, Twitter is like the biggest permanent focus group in the world, free for you to search to find what your customers really think about you. For example, John Legere, the CEO of T-Mobile, famously spends a ton of time on Twitter searching for what his customers love and hate about T-Mobile. He also responds directly to tweets from users, who were so shocked that he tweeted them that they’re now clamoring to switch to T-Mobile.

PB: How can brands do better on Twitter?
WH: Companies should see Twitter as the public, human face of their brands. By human, I mean imagine that your brand is a human being, and imagine your social media conversations as real human conversations you’re having with other human beings.
For example, no one in real life actually wants to be friends with someone who just keeps blabbing on about how he or she is the greatest person in the world. Similarly, your Twitter profile shouldn’t be a one-way conversation where you just post links to corporate press releases or generic product shots.
Instead, engage with your customers. Post advice and tips. Answer their questions and respond to their tweets as quickly as possible. Retweet your users’ content, such as when they post a beautiful photo. Like your users’ content, and thank them when they give you feedback. That gives your users the feeling of a ‘win.’
It’s basic social reciprocity’ just as we need to give and take in our daily relationships, so should brands on Twitter.

PB: What will people gain from attending your conference presentation?
WH: Businesses often struggle to understand what their customers are really thinking. In my presentation, I’ll talk about the pitfalls of relying on self-reported surveys when conducting customer research.
I’ll then showcase a novel experiment we ran on Twitter where we tested how a good (or bad) customer service experience from a brand affects the customer’s future decision-making process.
In that experiment, we found thousands of users who had a customer service interaction with an airline on Twitter and how we quantified’ in dollar terms’ how the customer changed their behavior after those positive interactions. For example, after a good experience, is that customer more willing to fly the airline again? Or will they just default for the cheapest carrier?
We’ll also discuss some interesting findings from recent psychology experiments that businesses should adopt if they want to impress their customers.

Want to hear more from Wayne? Join us at the Marketing Analytics & Data Science Conference. Learn, network and share best practices with the most influential leaders in data science and analytics. Stay connected at #MADSCONF.

Brilliance@Work profile originally published on www.starrybluebrilliance.com

Peggy L. Bieniek, ABC is an Accredited Business Communicator specializing in corporate communication best practices. 

Connect with Peggy on LinkedInTwitterGoogle+, and on her website at www.starrybluebrilliance.com

Learn How Twitter Measures the Value of Customer Service for Brands

“The greatest value of a picture is when it forces us to notice what we never expected to see.” – John Tukey, American mathematician


Data helps us to see what is really there. It helps us make informed decisions on how to reach and help our customers. In “Quick Insights on Using Data to Drive Your Digital Strategy,” Crissy Saint shares “a few quick insights on using data to drive your digital strategy in a more informed, cost-effective manner.”

Twitter can be used to effectively find your key audiences. But once you find them, you need to know how to effectively provide them with good customer service.

Join Wayne Y. Huang, Senior Research Lead, Twitter, as he presents “Measuring the Value of Customer Service for Brands’” at the Marketing Analytics & Data Science Conference(MADS) on June 8-10 in San Francisco, California.


During this session, Wayne explains the use of tweets and a novel application of conjoint analysis to measure the value of providing good customer service interaction with brands.

Register today for MADS to learn, network and share best practices with the most influential leaders in data science and analytics. Stay connected at #MADSCONF.

Session descriptions are from the Marketing Analytics & Data Science Conference brochure.

Peggy L. Bieniek, ABC is an Accredited Business Communicator specializing in corporate communication best practices. 

Connect with Peggy on LinkedInTwitterGoogle+, and on her website at www.starrybluebrilliance.com

How the Social TV Landscape is Evolving

Photo by Pierre Bouillot

During the Media Insights & Engagement Conference earlier this month, Erika Faust, SVP, Client Service, Nielsen Social, presented “The Evolving Social TV Landscape.” 

Why does social media matter for TV? According to Erika:
- Social TV corresponds with audience engagement through total earned activity.
- Social TV relates to TV ratings through the differences by social network.
- Social TV benefits advertisers through paid media.

Here are additional insights she shared on the social TV transformation:

- Social networking is growing. 60% of smartphone and tablet owners use devices while watching TV at least once a week.

- Minute-by-minute fans respond to linear TV. Twitter activity has a strong (79.5%) correlation to neurological engagement, a signal of general audience engagement. Social activity spikes during live airings.

- Authors that tweet about programs can drive earned media for advertisers. 

- Social activity could help signal TV premiere success. Twitter data helps anticipate 5 out of 10 new series premieres for 18-34 audiences. 

- Linear drives most tweets about TV today. 92% of tweets from streaming and linear group are about linear programs.

Stay turned for more conference highlights!

Peggy L. Bieniek, ABC is an Accredited Business Communicator specializing in corporate communication best practices. 

Connect with Peggy on LinkedInTwitterGoogle+, and on her website at www.starrybluebrilliance.com