Tag Archives: TMRE

Malcolm Gladwell, Authenticity & The Trump Era

In our profession, those who can foretell market trends will
always embody a competitive edge.
In the last 15 years, we’ve built TMRE: The Market Research Event into the
Market Research & Insights industry’s number one opportunity to learn from
and network with the brightest, boldest thought leaders in our industry.
This October, we’re thrilled to present the most
well-curated TMRE ever – with tons of all-new, trend-worthy topics, speakers
and sessions that smash the mold!
Here’s what we’ll be
buzzing about at TMRE 2017:

??        
Superstar author Malcolm Gladwell reveals how
embracing technology has helped him forge new connections with his audience -
and what those lessons can teach our evolving industry.
??        
The new U.S. administration has created
unforeseen realities and risks for brands, with “authenticity”
emerging as a buzzword of the year. Peter Horst, former Chief Marketing
Officer, The Hershey Company. helps leaders navigate this changing environment
in Marketing in the Trump Age.
??        
Introducing the Breakthrough Technology Start-Up
Showcase, a chance to meet the biggest and most disruptive industry start-ups,
while networking with the leaders who’ll shape our industry for years to come.
??        
Brand-new for TMRE 2017, we’ve partnered with
Women in Research (WiRE) to present the Women in Research Awards, honoring
outstanding female industry leaders, movers and shakers. 
Request the TMRE 2017
Brochure:
https://goo.gl/HkCp3u

And that’s not all!
??        
All New! Future-proof yourself at TMRE 2017′s
Industry Specific Days
??        
All New! Discover what today’s C-Suite really
wants to hear at the Chief Marketing Officer Forum
??        
1,100+ international executives & thought
leaders
??        
150+ speakers & 120+ content-driven
sessions!
??        
65% client-side attendance!
TMRE is the premier event for Market Research and Consumer
Insights thought leaders – an unparalleled opportunity to jump-start your
career, build an all-star network and invigorate your brand.
Use exclusive blog
discount code TMRE17BL for $100 off the current rate: 

Cheers,
The TMRE Team
@TMRE

#TMREvent 

Introducing the TMRE On Demand Webinar Series!

Introducing the TMRE On Demand Webinar
Series!

TMRE ON DEMAND
As insights leaders, we are
constantly tasked with evolving our skill sets and staying on top of the latest
MR trends.
The producers of TMRE: The Market
Research event are excited to announce that we’ll be delivering the
cutting-edge content and speakers to keep you informed year-round. The TMRE
webinar series takes you beyond the in-person event, and is designed for executives
with a relentless focus on securing the future of insights as a powerful force
for business success. Each quarter, the TMRE Webinar series delivers a 3-part
webinar experience designed to empower insights executives with the latest
information around hot topics to ensure insights drives bottom line impact.
Schedule of WEBINARS:
STORYTELLING WITH DATA
Wednesday, May 24, 2017 ‘ 2:00 ‘ 3:30 PM EST
Driving the
value of insights forward requires much more than just unearthing great data.
You need to use that data to tell a story and command influence across the
broader organization. Because storytelling may not be an inherent skill, this
3-part webinar focuses on how to use data to create an engaging, informative, compelling story. 
               
THE NEED FOR SPEED: BALANCING SPEED OF
INSIGHT WITH QUALITY OF INSIGHTS
Wednesday, August 16, 2017 – 2:00 – 3:30 PM
EST
There is a constant tug of war within
insights and research departments. Your internal end-users want things done
quickly and cheaply. While career market researches want to ensure they are
using the savviest tools and techniques, and not just will get the job done
first. This 3-part webinar focuses on how to balance speed and quality.
DEMYSTIFYING THE MILLENNIAL MINDSET
Wednesday, November 15, 2017 ‘ 2:00 ‘ 3:30 PM
EST
Millennials are currently the
largest purchasing base, but remain one of the biggest mysteries for companies
looking to understand the ‘why’ behind their actions and anticipate future
needs. This 3-part webinar focuses on MR in the on-demand mindset and generate
impactful insights that create brands/products around a purpose that speaks to
millennials.

Meet the Powerful Women Driving the Future of Customer Insights

TMRE: The Market Research Event and OmniShopper have some
exciting news to share’
Not only is TMRE partnering with WiRE (Women in Research)
for the first annual TMRE/WiRE Women in Research Award to celebrate some true
rock-star researchers, but we’re happy to share a preliminary list of powerful
women in insights confirmed to take the stage at both the TMRE and OmniShopper 2017
events.

Check out the inspiring women speaking at TMRE 2017:


??        
Dawn Cunningham, Chief Insights Officer, 3M
??        
Amber Case, Cyborg Anthropologist, Author, Calm
Technology
??        
Cole Nussbaum Knaffic, Founder, Storytelling
with Data
??        
Kristin Luck, Founder, WiRE: Women in Research
??        
Marina Kosten, VP Research – International
Theatrical, 20th Century Fox
??        
Elizabeth Merrick May, Head of Customer
Insights, Nest
??        
Christina Jenkins, Director, Global Business
Marketing, North America, Twitter
??        
Anna Fieler, Chief Marketing Officer, Popsugar
??        
Lisa Courtade, Head of Market Research, Merck
??        
Judy Melanson, SVP, Travel & Entertainment,
Chadwick Martin Bailey
??        
Amanda Hill, Chief Marketing Officer, A+E
Networks
??        
Margo Arton, Director of Ad Effectiveness
Research, Buzzfeed
??        
Lauren Zweifler, Senior Vice President
,Strategic Insights & Research, NBCUniversal
??        
Terrae Schroeder, Senior Director, Wholesome
& Shopper Insights, NA Snacks, Kellogg
??        
Theresa Pepe, VP of Research, Viacom
??        
Sarita Bhagwat, Vice President, Market
Intelligence, Fidelity Investments
??        
Julie Brown, President, The Center for Strategy
Research
??        
Lori Tarabeck, Global Market Insights, Abbott
Diabetes Care
??        
Renata Polcicio, Vice President, Fan and Media
Intelligence, International, Global Markets, ESPN
??        
Jennifer Avery, Director, Consumer Insights,
Universal Orlando Resort
??        
Sara Fahim, Senior Research & Innovation
Consultant, Seek Company
??        
Tiffany Sanders, Business Intelligence &
Research, CBS
??        
Emily Akinson, Insights & Planning, Consumer
& Market Insights, Kellogg
??        
Mary Beth Jowers, Consumer Insights Lead for
North, Central and Eastern Europe, Gruppo Campari
??        
Stephanie Cunningham, Senior Manager, Customer
Insights & Analytics, eBay
??        
Lina Roncancio, Insights & Innovation
Director, Discovery Communications Latin America
??        
Michelle Gansle, Director, Consumer & Market
Insights, Wm. Wrigley Jr. Company
??        
Karin Kricorian, Director, Management Science
and Integration, Disney
??        
Sarah Beachler, Director, Market Research &
Client Insights, Sephora
??        
Beth Coleman, SVP Marketing and Partner
Insights, Viacom
??        
Samantha Dawkins, Vice President, Client
Strategy & Advocacy, ADP
??        
Gabriela McCoy, Director of Global Consumer
Insights, Bacardi
??        
Kassie Deng, Director, Marketing & Partner
Insights, Viacom
??        
Lyndsey Albertson, Director of Sales Research,
ABC
??        
Maria Cristina Antonio, Director, Metabolic
Insights & Analytics, Novo Nordisk
??        
Julia Oswald, Senior Vice President, Strategy
& Insights, Domino’s Pizza
??        
Carley Metsker, Vice President, Client Service,
Directions Research
??        
Monika Mandrakas, Market Researcher &
Customer Advocate, Mutual of Omaha
View the TMRE brochure
for a full list of speakers:
https://goo.gl/1Ricj2
Check out the inspiring women speaking at OmniShopper 2017:

??        
Shopper Marketing Activations: Marketing &
Merchandising: J Lynn Martinez, Vice President & Team Lead Kroger, Dr
Pepper Snapple Group
??        
Customer Experience Design: How Research &
Design Collaborate to Build New and Differentiated Experiences: Kate Kompelien,
Customer Experience – Center for Excellence for Research & Strategy, Best
Buy
??        
Omnichannel Customer Analysis: Lakshmi
Venkataramari, Senior Director, Customer Insights & Analytics, Walmart
eCommerce
??        
Winning in Her Purse: Kelley Styring, Principal,
InsightFarm
??        
Knowledge is Power, If You Can Find It: Ashley
Starke & Diana Powell, Manager, Shopper Insights, ConAgra Foods
??        
Team Structure Doesn’t Matter: Sue Butler, Director
of Omnichannel Insights, Walmart
??        
Going Beyond Behavior to Drive Category Growth:
Monica Melichar, Senior Manager, Consumer Insights, Beam Suntory & Erin
Barber, Senior Vice President, C+R Research
??        
Longitudinal Data & the Low Purchase
Frequency Category: Stacy Carty, Shopper Insights, Samsung
??        
Driving Change While Driving the Business:
Improving Tools & Automation: Theresa Hendrickson, Director, eCommerce
Engineering – Business Tools & Processes, Best Buy
View the OmniShopper
Brochure for a full list of speakers: https://goo.gl/Qw8Juo
Use exclusive
LinkedIn discount code TMRE17LI for $100 off the current rate. Buy tickets to
TMRE now:
https://goo.gl/1Ricj2
Use exclusive
LinkedIn discount code OMNI17LI for $100 off the current rate. Buy tickets to
OmniShopper now:
https://goo.gl/Qw8Juo
Also, don’t miss our
upcoming free webinar ‘Storytelling with Data’ http://bit.ly/2o0bpAS
featuring speakers Kelsy Saulsbury, Manager, Consumer Insight & Analytics,
Schwan’s Shared Services, LLC and Bill Greenwald, Founder and Chief
Neuroleaderologist, Windsor Leadership Group, LLC. 
Driving the value of
insights forward requires much more than just unearthing great data. You need
to use that data to tell a story and command influence across the broader
organization. Because storytelling may not be an inherent skill, this webinar
focuses on how to use data to create an engaging, informative, compelling
story.  Register for the webinar here:
http://bit.ly/2o0bpAS
Cheers,
The TMRE & OmniShopper Teams
@TMRE
@OmniShopper

Here Comes Gen Z: 10 Keys to Understanding Them

According to Open Mind Strategy
research, these are the top things to know about the new kids on the block Gen
Z:
1. Huge
Gen Zs make up more than
a third of the world’s population and comprise nearly a quarter of the US
population ‘ bigger than both Millennials and Baby Boomers ‘ and still being
born.
2. The most diverse
generation ever
Gen Z will be the last
majority-White generation born in the United States. Already the white majority
is holding on by a thread, only 51% of Gen Z born into non-Hispanic White
families.
This generation’s
diversity also extends to their sexuality and gender identity. More than
one-third of Gen Zs self-identify as bisexual to some degree; more than half
know someone who uses gender-neutral pronouns.
3. They idolize
Influencers, not Celebrities
Most dedicate more time
to YouTube than any other social site and their view of celebrities isn’t limited
to movie stars and musicians, note the billions of views racked up by YouTube
stars RayWilliamJohnson and PewDiePie. They want to emulate self-made
Influencers who are just like them.
4. A plan to get paid
While Gen Zs are
certainly passion-driven, if they know their passions won’t lead to financial
stability, they have a plan for something that will. In everything from
entrepreneurship to sports, kids and teens are finding places to excel early
and focus their efforts in hopes of a payoff.
5. Having safe fun
Gen Zs are still
teenagers! They want to have a good time, but they don’t want to negatively
impact the successful future they are working to build. The teen pregnancy and
birth rate are at historic lows, as is the usage of cigarettes and heroin among
high-schoolers.
6. Caring about ‘cool’
Gen Z is snarky and very
image aware. With the ever-growing influence of social media, there is a
palpable return of ‘cool kids’ and ‘losers’ among Gen Z. They will quickly take
down a post that doesn’t receive enough likes for fear of someone seeing its
lack of attention.
7. Don’t share
everything online
Gen Z takes a crafted
and curated approach to posts. They are more aware of who they are sharing
their lives with and how it affects their identity, which is why platforms like
Snapchat are so appealing. They saw the devastating effects party pics had on
their sibling’s scholarship or job offer.
8. No Mo ‘Beta Boys’
Gen Z boys want to be
taken more seriously. To them, girls are certainly equal, but not better.
Gen Z boys want in on the partnership by taking themselves a bit more seriously
in school, work and relationships, but also embracing their sensitive side.
9. Mostly cynical
Gen Zs have realistic
expectations and are skeptical that the world will work in their favor. More
than eight in 10 Gen Zs were born after September 11. Growing up, conflicts
over issues like the economy, gun violence and climate change, have been
common. As a result, these teens have developed a valid claim to cynicism.
10. Still KIDS!
This generation is just
beginning to come of age, and as uptight as they may seem, they’re still kids
who haven’t quite figured it all out yet. They’re working hard and taking
themselves seriously, but they are still silly, young, fun and undeclared.
END
Open Mind Strategy, LLC, is a research and
brand strategy firm founded by Robin Hafitz, in 2010, with the mission of
providing ‘more human intelligence.’ OMS
(http://www.openmindstrategy.com/) provides
insight services, including qualitative and quantitative research, brand
studies, show and message testing, segmentation, and customized inquiries, as
well as strategic brand consulting and educational workshops. The O
MS
team is proud to have worked with leading clients, such as A&E Networks,
AMC, Amazon, Clear Channel, Cond?? Nast, Gannett, Kao Brands, MTV, NBCUniversal,
Scripps Networks, Unilever, USA Today, Yahoo!, and many more.

Must See Talks from KNect365′s Spring Insights 2017 Events

From former gang leaders, to cyborg anthropologists, to
biomimicry experts- KNect365′s Must See Talks will challenge you to look at
problems in a whole new way and become an ignitor of change for your organization.
‘The Centrality of a Detailed Understanding of your
Audience’ ‘ Haile Owusu, Chief Data Scientist, Mashable
Marketing Analytics & Data Science
April 3-5, 2017
San Francisco, CA
Use code MADS17LI for $100 off.
Buy tickets to see Haile: https://goo.gl/YqXZdx
‘The Consumer Influence ‘ and Impact ‘ of Virtual
Reality’ ‘ Jeremy Bailenson, Founding Director of Stanford University’s Virtual
Human Interaction Lab at Stanford University
TMRE in Focus
May 1-3, 2017
Chicago, IL
Use code FOCUS17LI for $100 off.
Buy tickets to see Jeremy: https://goo.gl/c2UdIv
‘Originals: How Non-Conformists Rule the World’ ‘ Adam
Grant, Professor, Author of Give and Take and Originals at The Wharton School
of Business at the University of Pennsylvania
OmniShopper
June 20-22, 2017
Minneapolis, MN
Use code OMNI17LI for $100 off.
Buy tickets to see Adam: https://goo.gl/oUB85g
‘Underdogs, Misfits
& the Art of Battling Giants’ ‘ Malcom Gladwell, Best-Selling Author of
Outliers, The Tipping Point and David & Goliath
TMRE: The Market Research Event
October 22-25, 2017
Orlando, FL
Use code TMRE17LI for $100 off.
Buy tickets to see
Malcom:
https://goo.gl/gM7Dtv
We hope to see you this
spring!
Cheers,

The KNect 365 Event Team

Image Recognition and the Future of Digital Analytics

This post was originally
published
on Kelton Global’s Blog.

The days of text-centric social feeds are officially long
gone. A whopping 1.8 billion images are uploaded to the Internet daily
and of those, 350 million are shared on Facebook. Instagram recently
surpassed 500 million active users, and Snapchat now has more active users than Twitter. The content that flows
into our social feeds is more heavily optimized than ever to deliver more of
what people want’less text and more visuals.
Brands have adapted their social content strategies
accordingly by delivering more visually immersive experiences. And while we’re
seeing significant shifts in branded content, this influx of visual content has
yet to herald a commensurate change in social analytics. Accordingly, few gains
have been made to measure and derive insights from the contents of images or
video. Social listening has historically focused on the challenges of text-based
analysis’specifically, the challenge of determining the context and meaning
behind posts. But as social media habits evolve, it’s clear that deriving
insights from pictures is an increasingly important aspect of understanding
consumers. That’s where image recognition comes into play.
Brands have adapted
their social content strategies accordingly by delivering more visually
immersive experiences.

Simply put, image recognition is the process of translating
images to data. Photos and images can reveal a wealth of data
points’demographics, purchases, personalities, and behaviors (just to name a
few). Through next generation image recognition, a mere selfie may reveal a
person’s gender, approximate age, location disposition, and even the clothing
brands that the person is wearing. As text-centric media takes a backseat to
image and video, the opportunity to understand the contents of these formats
grows. These insights represent a veritable treasure trove of actionable data
for brands.
Tools that analyze image and video-based content are still
in development, but increased investment in research is already impacting
commercial products and how they’re advertised. One example is brand logo
recognition’scanning images for brand logos, and flagging them with the
corresponding brand names. This tool is especially powerful considering that 80% of photos shared online depict a brand logo but don’t
explicitly call out the brand’s name.
 This fact points to a sizable
opportunity for companies to measure and understand the impact of these formerly
inaccessible data points.
Photos and images can
reveal a wealth of data points’demographics, purchases, personalities, and
behaviors (just to name a few).

As an example of how this applies to brands, Kelton’s
Digital Analytics team took a look at the scores of backyard BBQ photos that
flooded public forums, blogs, and social feeds over the recent 4th of July
holiday. We experimented to see which of two quintessentially American beverage
brands’Coca-Cola and Budweiser’netted more published images of
patriotically-themed bottles and cans (as well as other forms of branding) on
social media.

In the end, Coca-Cola branding was twice as prominent as
Budweiser’s. We found that Coke bottles and cans popped up in more diverse
settings such as public parks and inside motor vehicles, whereas Budweiser was
predominantly found in bars and house parties. Coke also aroused greater
sentiment around the theme of Americana, as many consumers
photographed vintage Coca-Cola gear and opted for bottles over cans. This might
explain why Coke captured a significantly greater share of social mentions than
Budweiser.
This example illustrates several ways that brands can
leverage image recognition technology to build actionable insights:
??        
Ethnographic data ‘ Identify where, when
and how often brands are showing up in people’s lives.
??        
Updated brand health analysis ‘ We now have
a more comprehensive point of view of brands’ online footprint.
??        
Sponsorship and Branding ROI ‘ Extend the
value of branding and sponsorships shared via online news, blogs and social
media through a multiplier effect.
??        
Influencer identification ‘ Find authentic
brand advocates who consume and spotlight your merchandise.
??        
Misuse use of brand iconography ‘ Surface
content that depicts improper usage of brand’s logo or other creative assets.

In today’s ever-shifting social media landscape, it’s never
been more important for brands and their partners to stay aware of the new and
emerging capabilities that can help better understand consumers’ behavior
online. Image recognition is just the beginning. From AI startups to instant
objection recognition devices
, the mobilization and fusion of research,
tech, and capital is quickly reshaping the way we think about analytics. These
new tools will add even more contextual understanding to sentiment on social
platforms, empowering brands to understand consumers like never before.

Consumer Behavior, DIY, Omnichannel and Millennials

By: Keri Hodnik and
Liz Williams, Euromonitor International

This article was
originally published on Euromonitor
International
The Market Research Event, TMRE, is an annual conference
that seeks to unite both clients and vendors, positioning itself as the only
event in the world with twice as many client side participants than any other
industry event of its kind. This year, it was held in Boca Raton, Florida, and
covered a wide range of topics, including: People; Tools, Tech, and
Methodology; Innovation, Macro Trends; Customer; Omni-Shopper, B2B /
Health&Wellness; and Partnerships. TMRE hosts a broad array of speakers,
from CEOs of Fortune 500 Companies to Neuroscientists that seek to decode the
mind of the consumer.
The theme of the entire event was ‘Command the Boardroom’,
which focused on how to bring the eyes and ears of the consumer into the
boardroom itself. The presence of the Consumer Insights function is not only
needed to energise the boardroom on the importance of the ever changing
consumer, but it is crucial in representing the big ideas that drive business
growth.
With that theme setting the stage for the event, the
following four trends emerged from the speakers:
CONSUMER
BEHAVIOUR                                                                    
                 
Better understanding the inner workings of the consumer was
a common theme at this year’s TMRE Conference. Zoe Chance, Author of ‘Better
Influence’ and Assistant Professor of Marketing at Yale School of Management,
led a keynote on Mastering Influence & Persuasion.
Chance was driven to leave the world of corporate marketing
to understand behavioral economics after observing a repeating trend: companies
often put a lot of time, money and energy into using data for business
decisions, but in the end, would use their guts anyway. Why is that?
Chance went on to explain the difference between System 1
and System 2 decision making. These are better known as the unconscious and
conscious mind, or as she called them: ‘Alligator Brain’ and ‘The Court’. The
unconscious mind is fast, it’s intuitive and it’s automatic. On the other hand,
the conscious mind is slow, deliberate and effortful. Most of us believe that
we’re making decisions with The Court, but Alligator Brain kicks in far more
often than we care to realise.
Rather than trying to ineffectively engage consumers’
conscious mind, Chance suggests that instead we should be working to peak the
Alligator Brain with her 5 key forces of influence:
  • Labelling: giving a name to the behaviour that you wish to
    encourage or discourage.
  • Ease: ‘Alligators are lazy’; companies like Uber, Tinder and
    Amazon are great examples of how to make it as easy as possible for consumers
    to take action.
  • Attention: creating open loops, or Moments of Truth (as
    coined by P&G), both stimulate curiosity since we as consumers have an
    insatiable want to close the loop.
  • Scarcity: loss aversion is a powerful motivator and can be
    roused by communications such as limited time, limited quantity and
    exclusivity.
  • ‘Hot Potato’: when forced with resistance, give it back as a
    problem to solve. If someone says they’re not interested, instead try asking:
    ‘You’re not interested’? as a way to promote deliberate decision making.

The subject of the conscious versus unconscious mind was
revisited again by David Eagleman: Neuroscientist, Author of ‘Incognito: the
Secret Lives of the Brain’ and Host of PBS’ ‘The Brain with David Eagleman’.
In his talk on ‘Emotion, Motivation, and Reputation’, he
explained that there is an enormous gap between what your brain is doing and
what your conscious mind is actually thinking. ‘Everything about your cognition
is happening incognito,’ Eagleman said. The implication of the unconscious
brain being the core driver of decision making is that asking consumers
questions about their decision making process is irrelevant.
Neuroscience can tell us a lot about the driving forces
behind the consumer path to purchase. Eagleman explained that there are three
networks in the brain: one for price point, one for pleasure and one for how
the decision itself is viewed:
  • Valuation: everything is judged in context. Saving $10 on a
    pair of headphones has a higher consumer response than saving $10 on an iPhone,
    despite the benefit being equal. We as consumers do not actually know what we
    want until we see it in context.
  • Emotion: despite our want to believe we are rational and
    unbiased, our actions prove otherwise. For instance, did you know that humans
    make harsher decisions if in a fowl smelling room?
  • Social: Eagleman explained that ‘people are wired to
    understand companies the same way they understand people. Breaches of trust
    travel fast and are un-erasable.’

DO-IT-YOURSELF RESEARCH
DIY Research was a key theme for one of the tracks at the
event, focusing on how and when to ‘be scrappy’ with research. DIY research is
a cost effective alternative to outsourcing solutions that allows you to
analyse research results in real time. As Andrea Stokes, the Senior Director of
Consumer Insights at Marriott International, said in her session titled, ‘Cheap
and Cheerful DIY Research’, it’s important to know when it makes sense to
pursue DIY research and also when it makes sense not to:
5 reasons to go DIY:
1.      
When you need it fast
2.      
When you have an easily accessible customer
database
3.      
When the question is not a $20,000+ question
4.      
When a question can be answered by consumer
feedback alone, meaning that advanced analytics and modelling are not required
5.      
When you have only 60 minutes of your
stakeholders’ time
5 reasons not to go DIY:
1.      
When the ask is complex
2.      
When more than one translation is needed
3.      
When data will help to defend or prevent a large
investment
4.      
When the CEO needs to make a business case to
the Board of Directors
5.      
When research is needed for crisis management
Some of the tools that Stokes suggests to aid in DIY
research are software, such as survey software and an insight community
platform through which to conduct your research. Mobile devices like iPads and
smartphones make data collection fast and easy, while tools such as excel or
other data visualization programs like Tableau are essential for storytelling.
Last, all that is needed is you (and maybe a videographer to capture the
process).
MILLENNIALS AND THE
FUTURE OF RETAIL

Any Channel, Anytime, Anywhere: Today’s consumer is very
busy with little downtime, always on the go, always carrying their phones and
always connected to the internet. Consumers are looking for a more convenient
and seamless way to shop given their busy lifestyles. Many businesses realize
this and are changing to fit consumer’s needs by providing seamless easier ways
to shop. Several examples include:
??        
Sephora Flash ‘ Sephora’s new stores that allow
consumers to purchase an item online or through the app and pick up in store
the following days
??        
Charity Wait ‘ an app that allows consumers to
donate to a charity in order to skip a line at their favourite restaurant
??        
Shyp ‘ an app that allows consumers to ship out
postal packages without having to visit the USPS store. The consumer arranges a
time for pick-up and Shyp will pick up the box and send it to the nearby post
office.
??        
Task Rabbit ‘ an app that offers a personal
assistant to complete your tasks that you have to do throughout the day, making
your day more efficient
Customized Products: Even though consumers are on the go,
they are still making specific decisions on what they are purchasing. Consumers
are looking for more personalisation and customisation in their lives and they
want it to be easy.
Ugg has made it easier for consumers to try on shoes by
providing them with an interactive floor mat that allows them to picture what
the shoe would look like on
Break Free of Demographics: Consumers want to break free of
demographics. They are looking for more of a new wholesome look which basically
means retailers should start positioning products as being non-gender.
OMNICHANNEL

Many large tech gurus such as Facebook even have a difficult
time capturing all types of consumer market research data. Companies like
Facebook capture any shopper data on mobile phones and desk top data but are
not able to see what is happening outside of their own space. Facebook
expresses that it is important to capture all channels of shopper insights to
understand the full data set for the ever changing consumer.
Facebook has found that through their internal data numbers,
consumers tend to have a purchasing pattern per omnichannel. Many consumer turn
to mobile to shop for categories that are less expensive, perhaps because it
doesn’t take much thought or commitment to purchase these items that might be
used every day. However, consumers tend to turn to their desktop for categories
that are more expensive which may be due to internet connection worry or being
able to see the product on a larger screen.

What Facebook is unaware of through internal data is
in-store shopping habits. This type of data may help companies like Facebook
understand what brand elements trigger market behaviour, what is going to drive
consumers to make purchases in store, what the importance of labels play when
shopping in different channels and how can they measure behaviour of a shopper
on each channel.

Diverse Demographics: Breaking Stereotypes

Millennials are the most diverse generation
in history ‘ only 59% are Caucasian and 27% have an immigrant background (Deloitte, 2015). Therefore, it’s no surprise that this
demographic expects brands to embrace and reflect the diversity of their lives
‘ a trend previously highlighted by Stylus Life in our report No
normal: Post-diversity marketing
. If brands are to do this successfully, they
must move beyond crude stereotyping to represent a broad spectrum of race,
gender and sexuality.
For instance, Muslim millennials offer
growing opportunities for brands
‘ the Muslim consumer lifestyle market is
predicted to reach $2.6tn by 2020. The modern yet faith-driven outlook of this
group, along with a growing disposable income, will see them buy into brands
that reflect or understand their values. Make-up brand CoverGirl is already
tapping into this lucrative demographic with its latest brand ambassador ‘beauty
blogger and hijab wearer Nura Afia
. One of a growing number of Muslim
beauty bloggers, her new role demonstrates the importance and appeal of diverse
representation.

Beauty brands are working particularly hard
to cater to often forgotten demographics. A new initiative from L’Oreal
offers free step-by-step audio tutorials
to give visually impaired women
more independence. The usability has been carefully considered to fit the needs
of this consumer group ‘ the cosmetic and skincare tutorials are concise to fit
into everyday habits, while the app’s customisable user interface features a
monochrome palette and large text.
Also targeting a currently under-catered
market, UnBeweavable
Hair
is an on-demand hair service specifically for women of colour.
On-demand beauty services, which provide a stylist straight to your home or
workplace, have been rising in popularity for some time now ‘ yet UnBeweavable
Hair is the first tailored to the specific needs of this demographic.

Created by Zina Alfa, it was inspired by her own difficulties in finding
hairdressers who understood her needs. Made by a woman of colour for other
women of colour, this case study shows that if brands want to provide products and
services that appeal to all, they must improve the diversity of their
workforce.

Rebecca Minkoff recently highlighted the
need for diverse workforces, citing the lack
of female employees in technology companies
(and STEM fields in general) as
a key reason why wearables are not currently capturing female consumers. The
fashion designer also mentions examples of having to explain female
expectations and behaviours ‘ such as taking jewellery off at night ‘ that were
missed by an all-male team.
There’s a popular saying promoting better
gender and race representation that suggests ‘you cannot be what you cannot
see’ ‘ but this could easily be extended to ‘you cannot create for audiences
you don’t represent and understand’. Which is why companies with diverse workforces
are more likely to financially outperform those that are not (McKinsey,
2015). So if you want to ensure your products appeal to an increasingly diverse
consumer landscape, you’d better start with your job adverts.

Brought to you by Stylus Life, creativity and innovation news
from around the web.

How Are You Treating Your Organizational Data?

By: Anil Damodaran, Blueocean
Market Intelligence Assistant Vice President

Data fragmentation has existed for over 15 years and still does
today. However, the challenge has grown tremendously due to an increase in the
number of data sources and devices in use, at the workplace and home. Today,
data is generated and stored not only on office PCs and laptops, but on mobile
devices such as smartphones, tablets, online storage devices, and more.
Most of this data is generated in bits and pieces during
various activities like exchange of emails, feedbacks, chats, IoT feed
captures, and pilot surveys. It lies around in devices or unused drives, and
often treated as office stationery, until one day someone suddenly realizes the
cost implications of this recklessness. According to research from Salesforce,
about 53 percent of organizational data is left unanalyzed that could otherwise
have signified an opportunity for decision makers.[1]
The problem, at a grass-roots level, is leaving data unattended with disparate
sources and not implementing proper data governance.
So what can we do?
Data fragmentation can be addressed if you start considering
data generated within your organization as a corporate asset. By doing so, it
will become more instinctive to institute practices and processes of measuring
data. Once you can measure their data, it becomes easier to tag the data based
on business relevance and quality attributes.
For example, in almost all companies large and small, it is
common to take stock of infrastructure ‘ tangible and intangible ‘ and tag
them, such as company IP, laptops, mouse, and so on to the employee using it.
Similarly, are you then tagging your data generated within your organization to
its source, purpose, time, format and so on? It has been found that only 13
percent organizations have properly integrated data and predictive insights
extensively into their entire business operations.[2]
Companies that drive their businesses using data-driven strategies are five
percent more productive and realize six percent higher profits.[3]
Here are some of the traits of an organization that treat
data as an asset vs. those that do not.[4]
Organization that treats data as an asset
Organization that does not treat data as an asset
Is more innovative
Less innovative and tends to become commoditized in the long run
Is more customer-centric
Pushes products to customers, instead of developing products based on
customer needs
Harbors a culture of openness and collaboration
Politics and hierarchy based system tend to keep data in silos
Business decisions are data-driven
Run on personal experience and intuitions
Business processes and performance are measured based on feedback and
analytical models
Practices age-old business processes; no system for measuring
business performance
Risk mitigation is proactive
Risk mitigation is reactive
What kind of an organization are you and what is your
biggest challenge with the evolution? Share with us your experience and views.
Blueocean Market
Intelligence is a global analytics and insights provider that helps
corporations realize a 360-degree view of their customers through data
integration and a multi-disciplinary approach that enables sound, data-driven
business decision. To learn more, visit www.blueoceanmi.com.