Tag Archives: TMRE 2012

A Look Back at TMRE: Applying an experiential-based approach to brands

In the upcoming weeks, we’ll be featuring insights from The Market Research Event 2012 attendees. 

In today’s update, Dave Gustafson shares his notes on Day 1 Track 3, Ad & Media Research Track, Movie Going in the Digital Age: How Changes in Media Consumption Have Changed the Movie Going Decision Making Process with Jon Gibs, Senior Vice President, NBC Universal 

Based on the data NBC Universal captures from Fandango, Jon identified two emerging trends affecting movie goers: 1) digital media is playing an increasingly central role in the purchasing process, and 2) fewer consumers are buying more tickets (10% of consumer purchase 50% of the tickets sold online).

Jon noted that with respect to movie going, online word of mouth is currently increasing in importance, while traditional motivators, such as the genre, the star of the movie and the level of special effects are decreasing in importance.

He suggested movie going today is akin to ‘a night out on the town,’ and it is vital for NBC Universal to tap into and appeal to that experience.

Jon differentiated between two segments of movie goers ‘ Avids and Casuals. Avids love going to movies with their friends on opening night and feeling the ‘buzz’ and anticipation ‘ they attend 17-18 movies a year. He described the build up and anticipation of a good movie (e.g., Hunger Games, The Hobbit) as something that is planned for as much as three months in advance. Since many movie theaters are located near malls, local eating establishments and retail outlets benefit from the ‘night out.’ Avids spend an average of $110 a night when they attend movies. Casuals, on the other hand, are much less inclined to plan in advance, and are less focused on the experience.

He reviewed the ‘Path to Purchase’ consumers take to buying a movie ticket, which consists of a 6-step process: 1) Discover (become aware of a particular movie), 2) Gather (conduct research), Influence (explore types of media), 4) Socialize (pass on what is learned about the movie), 5) Narrow (reduce the number of choices), and 6) Transact (buy the ticket).

Jon concluded that the Path to Purchase is increasingly driven by online information gathering.

What can we learn from the behavior of movie goers, and how can we apply that experiential-based approach to our brands?
To what extent can we define the path to purchase for our brands?
How can we leverage the experiential aspect of interacting with our brands?

Dave Gustafson is a career market researcher based in the
Philadelphia area. In addition to owning and running his own boutique
market research firm, he is the Chief Advisor at Spych Market Analytics,
LLC. Dave can be reached at dave@SpychResearch.com

Wish to submit your insights for inclusion in this series? Email submissions to Michelle LeBlanc at mleblanc@iirusa.com 

A Look Back at TMRE: Ingredients for Success when using MROCs

In the upcoming weeks, we’ll be featuring insights from The Market Research Event 2012 attendees. 

In today’s update, Dave Gustafson shares his notes on Day 1 Track 2
Social Media Listening Track, “It’s More than Just Buzz: How to Leverage Social MR and SM Listening to Gain Insights” with Caroline Klompmaker, Global Insights Business Lead, Burt’s Bees Div of Clorox.

Caroline defined the Burt’s Bees MROC as ‘a marketing formula of influencers and passionate fans.’ At Burt’s Bees, they try to be creative ‘ e.g., they host public events for bloggers, they have developed a MROC from their opt-in e-mail list (‘The Hive’), etc.

She defined social media as Internet-based tools and platforms that provide enhanced interactions. She suggested it is important with MROCs to emphasize active participation and collaboration. In addition, from an interpretation standpoint, there is a need to understand biases/skews with social data, and the need for a structured approach in order to gain insights (because there is so much data/information).

Engagement with their online community occurs via a variety of approaches — discussion forums, highly-visual surveys, highlights and clicks, photo sharing, digital journals and collages. Caroline noted ‘it is all about keeping the community active and engaged.’

Relative to traditional research, there are some definite pros/benefits from social media listening: large sample, timeliness/immediacy, ease/access to information, and cost effectiveness.

However, there are also cons/things to be aware of when using results from social-based approaches: skewed sample (digital), the information is publicly-shared, and the ‘group think’ phenomenon.

Caroline’ advice/ingredients for success when using MROCs include the following suggestions:
1) ensure the insights fit within your research plan,
2) cultivate an internal knowledge base of social and its applications,
3) seek a champion/nurture internal support,
4) be cognizant of the MROC terms/specifications (e.g., size, frequency of interactions, etc.),
and 5) leverage vendor support.

As Marketers, how can we put social market research and social media listening into the appropriate context? How does your MROC compare?

Dave Gustafson is a career market researcher based in the
Philadelphia area. In addition to owning and running his own boutique
market research firm, he is the Chief Advisor at Spych Market Analytics,
LLC. Dave can be reached at dave@SpychResearch.com

Wish to submit your insights for inclusion in this series? Email submissions to Michelle LeBlanc at mleblanc@iirusa.com 

A Look Back at TMRE: Staying Relevant with Today’s Consumersn

In the upcoming weeks, we’ll be featuring insights from The Market Research Event 2012 attendees. In today’s update, Dave Gustafson shares his notes on Day 1 Track 1:
Trends Track: Using Metaphor Elicitation to Capture the Mood of the Nation
with Stephen Hahn-Griffiths, Chief Strategy Officer, Leo Burnett.

Brief: Staying Relevant with Today’s Consumers

Stephen suggested there are six meta types of consumers (based on a driving metaphor):
1) Arrivers,
2) Engineers (plan methodically),
3) Lonely Travelers (feel handcuffed),
4) Easy Riders (middle of the road; non materialistic),
5) Dismayed Mechanics (need a jump start; something is missing in their life), and
6) Defensive Drivers (need help/assistance; live pay check to pay check).

He emphasized the need to increase comfort with what a brand stands for, with a focus on participation, motivation, resonance and relevance. He cited several examples of different approaches companies currently use to increase comfort:
‘ Panera ‘ creating comfort through quality
‘ Zappos ‘ comfort through customer experience
‘ Fidelity ‘ comfort through road to financial future
‘ Kellogg’s/Frosted Flakes ‘ comfort through rituals/nostalgia
‘ Jet Blue ‘ comfort via amenities

How do today’s brands stay relevant with today’s consumers?
How can we keep our customers engaged?

This leaves us with some interesting questions marketers need to ask themselves:
1) What meta type(s) does my brand serve?
2) Where does my brand fit on the ‘road to comfort’?


Dave Gustafson is a career market researcher based in the Philadelphia area. In addition to owning and running his own boutique market research firm, he is the Chief Advisor at Spych Market Analytics, LLC. Dave can be reached at dave@SpychResearch.com

Wish to submit your insights for inclusion in this series? Email submissions to Michelle LeBlanc at mleblanc@iirusa.com 

The Emotional Mind

Today’s blog post comes from Dr. David Forbes, Ph.D., of Forbes Consulting, an exhibitor at The Market Research Event 2012.

Why do consumers ‘really’ think and act as they do?

We have long known that the deep seated emotional centers of the human mind generate the most powerful motivational forces driving consumer behavior. Traditional market research, however, has historically only accessed the conscious intellectual layers of the consumer mind. The desire to learn about the emotions that ‘really’ control behavior are largely unfulfilled.

Two barriers confront the market researchers in this quest. First, consumers are often unaware consciously of these deep-seated emotional forces.

As St. Augustine wrote in the thirteenth century, ‘I cannot grasp all that I am.’ His insight remains true of consumers today. Consumers today are no more able to grasp the motivations that arise from emotional centers of the brain that work below the level of consciousness than St. Augustine was; in the language of pop psychology, consumers are ‘out of touch’ with their feelings on the issues important to marketers.

Second, consumers are often unwilling to share their emotions with market research professionals, even when they are able to consciously access and articulate their emotions. Rare is the respondent who is willing to share reasons for behavior that might make them seem frivolous or irrational.

So where does this leave market research in its quest for ‘real reasons’ behind consumers’ behavior?

The news actually is good. The conscious mind is far from irrelevant ‘ it remains an important driver of attitudes and behavior, and traditional market research continues to excel at researching the conscious mind. For the first time, neuropsychologists have documented the activity in those areas of the brain responsible for our emotions. Employing techniques from perceptual and cognitive science, clinical market researchers have begun to leverage the insights from neuropsychology to devise methods for ‘talking’ to these emotional centers of the brain.

Our proprietary Forbes MindSight?? technique is a good example of how the latest insights about the brain can help market researchers acquire the once elusive emotional reasons for behavior ‘ to get new data about ‘real’ reasons that they have never gotten before. Consumers may remain unaware of their emotions or unable to share their emotions with us, but technologies such as MindSight?? are overcoming these barriers.

Why do people really think and act the way they do? We are revealing motivations that they themselves may not know. Results from MindSight?? research suggest that surprises are in store ‘ for marketers and market researchers, and even for consumers themselves!

For more information on Forbes Consulting please visit http://www.forbesconsulting.com/

I feel like an infant and other final thoughts from this year’s The Market Research Event

I try not to take notes at conferences.   That’s because I find that I rarely look
back at them.  And when I do, they make
little sense as they are generally snatches of information, witty quotes without
attribution and nonsense such as this year’s winner: ‘I feel like an
infant.’  I have no idea why I wrote that
down.  I usually try to write down my own
ideas, inspired by the presentations, so that I have a useful array of output
for my time spent.

Nice try.  Now that
two weeks has passed since the IIR’s The Market Research Event, I scanned the
little notebook they gave me that proved irresistible during the event and here
are a few final noteworthy snippets of stuff I wrote down about presentations.  Along with some points out of context that
could be humorous if you know me well.

First, the presentation by Amy Burgdorf, Director of Market
Research and Insights for Carhartt was wonderful because it immersed the
attendees in a culture they clearly have no basis for understanding at
all:  People who work with their
hands.   Let’s face it, the most work I
did with my hands this week was picking last week’s manicure from my
nails.  But back to Amy.  Her key point was how immersion with real
people on-the-job was invaluable to helping create a brand based in
authenticity that is now emerging in popularity as a ‘lifestyle brand.’  When asked if they would focus more on the
majority of their customers who were clearly not working construction or farms,
she said they wouldn’t stray from their blue collar roots for opportunistic
sales.  Go Amy!! This was followed by a
lovely, unbridled question from the audience that I can’t remember but
demonstrated a total lack of awareness of the brand and inattention to the
presentation.  It was the laugh of the
day but Burgdorf handled it well, saving as much face as possible for the
person asking.   Well done.

I also had the pleasure to see Eric Lum, Vice President
Strategic Marketing for Columbia Records/Sony Music present his views on music
as ‘the currency of attention’ for television advertising.  This was fascinating to me as I pondered what
our currency of attention should be for market research surveys or engagements
with consumers.  How do we incentivize respondents to
participate and stick with us.  All you
have to do is play a cool indie song and I’ll watch your ad’ more than
once.  It does work.  So, what’s next for us?

What’s our next step as an industry?  I don’t know but if you believe keynote Bob
Johansen, Fellow at the Institute for the Future, it’s probably something to do
with games and information floating in the air right in front of you.   A fascinating talk but you know what they
say about futurists.  They can say
anything they want because the future never really comes.  And for every trend there is a countertrend
they forgot to mention.   I imagine a
future where the air around me is filled with digital garbage much like my
smart phone is now.  Sorting through this
is the business opportunity of the future. 
But that’s not a sexy keynote, so Nevermind (thanks Nirvana).

I heard that David Boyle, Senior Vice President of Consumer
Insight for EMI gave an incredible speech to an audience of a dozen.   I was sorry to hear about the low turnout
and particularly sorry to have missed it because I heard it was so good.   I also missed William Leach from
Brainjuicer, a Pepsico Alum because people were smashed into the room and
spilling out into the hallway.  Both of
these are worth perusing on the IIR’s website if you get a chance.

I dropped in on Mark Brooks, Vice President Consumer and
Market Intelligence, with L’Oreal as he described ‘L’Oreality.’  This is an interesting concept because every
company creates its own reality from the myths of the past and beliefs of the
current organization.   He discussed
internal competitiveness that demanded ‘resiliency’ as the key attribute for
success and that the conflict, rather than avoided was fostered because ‘the
greatest things happen through conflict.’ 
That’s not for everyone, particularly not for your average market researcher.  This tells me that you have to be pretty
exceptional to rise at L’Oreal and this was underscored by one of his final
comments.  ‘A lot of people didn’t make
it in this transformation (to a new way of doing business),’ he said with a
soft smile, ‘but that was completely up to them.’  Bravo, Mark!

Dani Vanzant, Manager Customer Experience Programs and
Satisfaction for Southwest Airlines, demonstrated how you could squeeze one
measure so hard it actually came to life. 
I’m talking about NPS (net promoter score) which became a darling of the
survey world about a decade ago and has struggled to remain relevant in a sea
of new, complex ideas.   Dani built a
compelling case for the relevance of NPS by partnering  with sharp software to make it ‘easy,
accessible, actionable and flexible’ ‘ in other words, relevant, in every slice
and even sliver of her organization.  
She also uses continuous system user surveys to make the system ‘agile’
‘ under continuous revision, so NPS can not only measure but also  motivate and transform an organization.  Powerful stuff.

It was fun to see Sandra Kelly from 3M in the front row for
Ryan Lein, Director of Category Management and Consumer Insight for Hanes
Brands presentation on DIY.   That’s
because Sandra has been on the cutting edge of internalizing DIY for insights
for the past 5 years.  She shocked the
IIR audience in San Francisco a few years back by showing price per study that
were about one zero short of the average bid.  
Ryan took that saber and drive it through the heart of qualitative by
suggesting that small, iterative surveys could replace much of the typical
qualitative we do today in preparation for final qualifying quantitative
measurement of new ideas.     This coupled with his ideas around DIY and
Insight Led Selling made for a fresh and compelling discussion.   From the company who gave us the tagless
t-shirt, we do expect big things and Ryan delivered.

Finally, I wrapped up my immersion in The Market Research
Event with Michelle Adams, Marketing Brainology Inc, and also a Pepsico Alum,
presenting a study from POPAI.  Michelle
is an incredible speaker who engaged the audience while revealing emotional
drivers behind the shopping experience. 
In her own words, ‘It all boils down to choice but it’s not always
conscious.’  In fact, her data builds a pretty
compelling case that it’s rarely conscious when we make choices at the
shelf.  That made me wonder about other
choices, like deciding who to marry and raise children with’ how conscious is
that choice?  If you believe the Old
Spice bottle, not very, because they’re saying if our Dads didn’t wear it we
wouldn’t be here.   While Michelle showed
video of a shopper wearing neuroscience headgear and eye tracking goggles while
shopping a shelf, I wondered if I could talk women into doing this at a bar and
peruse men.  What areas of the brain
would alight? While they were looking at what? 
And what would the objects of scrutiny be thinking about these women and their accessories?  What if the shampoo bottles were looking back
at you, what would they say?  I suppose
my mind did wander a bit but she always brought me back to the content with
questions from the audience, promising Denny’s gift cards for good
answers.  And she got a few.    

You’ll notice I’ve not mentioned most of the keynotes.  These were well-attended and high quality as
you’d expect.  What is often overlooked
are the stellar breakouts.  With 3 days, 9 tracks each day and more than 50 presentations, it’s not possible to absorb everything this
event has to offer.  Maybe in the future,
the information will all float in front of me and I’ll use my emotions to
choose which data to watch and absorb. 
But for now, I’ll just come again next year and hunt up the good stuff
for myself.  Hope to see you there.

Survey vs. Social: How Does it Stack Up?

This post comes from TMRE Platinum Sponsor Maritz and is cross-posted from the Maritz Sound Check blog.



Last week, 16 people from Maritz Research attended The Market Research Event
in Boca Raton, Florida. There were great networking opportunities among
colleagues, vendors, clients and even competitors and also
opportunities to share ideas. Maritz Research was the platinum sponsor
for the conference and also gave three presentations. As always, Randy
Brandt’s presentation (he blogged to preview it before the conference)
was well received and provided hard evidence of something most already
suspected. How does traditional survey research stack up to social
media? You can see more details of the study in his deck, but here’s a video sharing the highlights.

Visit
 

Visit the Maritz Sound Check blog for more insights.

The 2012 Market Research Event Will Focus on Social Media

This post comes from TMRE Platinum Sponsor Maritz.  Author Randy Brandt will be presenting  A Comparison of Website and Survey-Based Customer Comments: Do They Tell the Same Story? along with David Ensing, PhD, Vice President, VoC Integration on Tuesday, November 13.   

The 2012 Market Research Event Will Focus on Social Media

By: Randy Brandt

I have been attending The Market Research Event for at least 10 years, and have had the privilege of presenting research findings and points-of-view during most of those years. The Market Research Event has always been one of the best conferences of its type, but this year promises to be the most exciting yet.

Ever since Proctor and Gamble’s Joan Lewis asserted that social media may replace surveys as a primary source of market research data (which she did at a 2011 Advertising Research Foundation event), there has been a growing debate about the relative merits of social media and more traditional market research.

At this year’s event, there will be nearly a dozen presentations that address the issue of how social media can be used as a key source of market and consumer insights. I aim to attend as many of these as possible.

My colleague Dave Ensing and I will be presenting results of research Maritz has been conducting to explore how social media and more traditional survey data compare. Do ratings from websites like TripAdvisor?? tell the same story as those captured via traditional surveys? What about text data? We will be sharing results that address both of the preceding questions and more.

Hope to see you at our session on Tuesday, November 13 at 2:45!

This post is co-posted with the SoundCheck Blog.

Clear view on MR things needed…

One of the good things when blogging for a longer period of time is the fact that you – virtually – get to know a lot of people in your area of profession.

One of the bad things is, that if you keep on blogging about specific topics for let’s say more than three years, you will see the day, that somebody you love to follow and read stops blogging. Although there are a lot of reasons for someone to stop blogging, sometimes you wish to read more from some “fading blogs”.

However, sometimes it is valuabel to re-scan even those once loved “fading blogs”, search for the good postings, re-read it and see if and what has changed over tim.

Yesterday I re-found one of my all time favourite posts ever – from May 2010.

Obviously MR hasn’t died and is still alive, but some of Mr. Heretic, the blog owner, manifesto-style hypotheses are of course still dominating today’s MR-scene.

For example this one: “You killed market research when you defended the status quo.” To be honest, this is what we do every day, don’t we? And for some reasons this is okay. But what about innovations?

I very much agree to Katie’s view on active innovation. And MR has already talked a lot about innovation in 2012..

… but nearly exclusively to its clients :-)  
However, what about innovating the own industry?

Another example: “You killed market research when you mistook information for understanding”
To be honest, I got a little bit fed up with the term “insight” over the last years. If every piece of information, offered to me as an insight really was an insight, I would be a wise man today.

Mistaking information for understanding also leads to the fact that we mis-educate our professional young talent. They often use the word insight, not knowing the difference between information and understanding.

So even MR is still alive our MR-world is still complex.
One of the consequences: We need a clear view on things and talk with each other about  the requirements.

To get a clear view on the status quo regarding innovation and insighting (beyond lots of others) make sure that you join us at the The Market Research Event 2012, hosted by IIRUSA November 12-14, 2012 in Boca Raton, FL. For more about this year’s program download the agenda.

———–
Today’s guest post is from Christian D??ssel (@olympiamilano). Christian is Senior Research Director at MM-Eye, a market research and research consulting firm in Hamburg / Germany helping clients from US and Asia to research Europe. He has worked for TNS, TBWA and other advertising, strategy and market research agencies helping clients from industries such as finance, transport and logistics, telecommunication and entertainment to understand consumers through market research and to increase implementation excellence. He will be live blogging from The Market Research Event 2012 this November 12-14 in Boca Raton, Florida. If you’d like to join him, register today and mention code TMRE12BLOG to save 15% off the standard rate!

Activate Innovation

Today’s post comes from TMRE Guest Blogger, Katie Clark. She is also known as @InsightsGal on Twitter and a client-side market researcher, project manager, and social media maven. 

Why a penguin? It will make sense in a minute

I have to confess, one of the sessions I am most looking forward to at TMRE is ‘Creating a culture for Successful Innovation’ given by the Campbell Soup Company.

Why?

Because innovation is so very important to drive a business forward.

But far too often I observe companies requesting (or demanding!) their employees’and specifically their research teams’be innovative, without creating a culture in which innovation is part of the life breath of the organization. 

It’s not enough to wish it and it will be so.  Consider some of the below steps to take towards becoming an innovative organization’and then join me for the Campbell Soup Company session at TMRE!

Hire Hungry
When adding to your team, seek out characteristics in potential new hires that lead the way to innovative thinking such as: a propensity for proactivity, openness to new ideas and feedback, and a past track record of measured risk-taking in their former role.  Hire staff that is hungry for new challenges and who are open to learning along the way. For more on characteristics to look for, this is an excellent article.

Reward Risk Taking (and Sometimes Failure)
One of my favorite moments every year at our company is when awards are announced, and my favorite award is the ‘First Penguin’ award.  You may think that’s an odd name, but hear me out.

When a group of penguins approaches an ice shelf, one penguin must be the first to ‘take the plunge’ ‘ aka First Penguin.  There may be sea lions waiting in the water for that first penguin to take the dive, so it’s a risky move that can lead to great success’or great failure.

At our company, the reward goes to a staff member who takes a big risk and innovates with one of our products.  The risk may not lead to great success, but that staff member took the plunge off the ice shelf.

Shake Complacency
It’s easy to get too comfortable and complacent with your job’and if you do it’s likely your staff will follow suit. I spoke to this a bit earlier in my Outside your Comfort Zone blog post but I feel it bears repeating.

Shake off your complacency and that of your staff.  Network with other peers in the industry online or in person to see how others are approaching similar challenges.  Get out of the office for a group training day, exploring a type of research you don’t typically do’that will help to energize you and your team and shake the cobwebs out of your brains.  < For more on building an innovative culture, take a look at this recent article in Inc. Magazine ‘ it’s a short read and a good one!
___________
More about Katie: Based in Portland, Maine, Katie manages the market research team at Diversified Business Communications. She has worked with companies large and small and in industries such as seafood, 3D laser imaging, software, fragrance, finance, and entertainment to help them move the business forward through actionable insights derived from market research. She is passionate about bringing the’Voice of the Customer’ inside the organization. The opinions expressed here are her own and not those of her employer.

If you’d like to join Katie at TMRE 2012 this November 12-14 in Boca Raton, Florida, register today and mention code TMRE12BLOG and save 15% off the standard rate! For more about this year’s program, download the agenda.

Back to Basics

Today’s post comes from TMRE Guest Blogger, Katie Clark. She is also known as @InsightsGal on Twitter and a client-side market researcher, project manager, and social media maven. 

As we prepare to head off to TMRE in a few short weeks, I know we’re all thinking about the latest in research strategy and innovation that we’ll learn about while on site in Boca Raton, as well as taking advantage of the myriad of networking opportunities!

But let me take this moment to bring us back down to earth for a moment and share a cautionary tale about remembering the research basics.

I spoke with an industry peer recently who is graciously allowing me to share his story. For the sake of this blog, let’s call him Todd (not his real name!).

Over the past year, Todd and his team have been following the mobile research trend and were excited to get approval to pilot a mobile research strategy at one of their one-day events. They had done extensive research to understand how active their audience was on mobile, especially tablets.

Todd and his team were very thorough in setting up tablet optimized session surveys to be available for launch at the end of each session time, as well as some other short surveys and activities meant for tablet use.

Sounds great, right?

However, from the keynote kickoff in the morning to the lunchtime round table discussions, Todd’s team saw lots of note taking…on paper! Pens and pads of paper were the rule of the day. After observing this in multiple sessions, Todd did some intercepts to find out where they went wrong with their tablet research.

Come to find out their tablet research was spot-on: pretty much everyone Todd stopped brought an iPad or other tablet device, but had left them in the hotel rooms due to sky-high WiFi rates that by that point were non-negotiable with the conference center/hotel.

The lesson we can all learn from Todd’s story? Be sure you cover the basics, especially around logistics, when launching a new research venture. The epilogue? Todd and his team did some quick thinking and were able to field some paper surveys for the afternoon sessions.

For more learning from your peers, be sure to catch some of the interactive discussion sessions at TMRE with Intel, Johnson & Johnson, Bloomberg News, and more.
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More about Katie: Based in Portland, Maine, Katie manages the market research team at Diversified Business Communications. She has worked with companies large and small and in industries such as seafood, 3D laser imaging, software, fragrance, finance, and entertainment to help them move the business forward through actionable insights derived from market research. She is passionate about bringing the’Voice of the Customer’ inside the organization. The opinions expressed here are her own and not those of her employer.

If you’d like to join Katie at TMRE 2012 this November 12-14 in Boca Raton, Florida, register today and mention code TMRE12BLOG and save 15% off the standard rate! For more about this year’s program, download the agenda.