Tag Archives: The Media Insights & Engagement Conference

Insights Interview: James Petretti, SVP, Research & Analytics, Sony Pictures TV

In our recent insights interview, we sat down with James Petretti,
Senior Vice President, U.S. Research and Analytics to discuss how to reach the new
age media consumer.
Here’s what Petretti had to say:
What is the state of
the media research industry in 2017?
Petretti: Media Research is more complicated than ever
before ‘ more platforms, more channels, more kinds of content and more measures
than ever before ‘ the different types of data sets, and sheer amount of it
that  we are required to work with today means we need to bring in new
skill sets and core competencies ‘ so it’s a constant learning process on top
of trying to stay on top of an ever-increasing amount of information’ it’s exhilarating
and exhausting at the same time.
What have been the
biggest changes in the industry since you started your career?
Petretti: We’ve
moved from an analog to digital world ‘ that’s changed everything.
Have the influx of
social media and mobile made your job easier or harder?
Petretti: Both ‘
there’s more data to have to consider ‘ but it’s often a rich data set that
allows us to have immediate feedback
How has the media
consumer changed in the past few years?
Petretti: The
Consumer is King today’ they’re in control
How can media
companies do a better job reaching the new age consumer?
Petretti: We need
to make sure we respect the consumer today ‘ when Media was a one to many
medium, media companies were driving the relationship ‘ but that’s changed and
we must respond in kind ‘ we can’t just look at consumers as ‘audience targets’
‘ we must understand them as individuals and consider how we can help satisfy
their needs and expectations.
What is the biggest
challenge in the media industry today?
Petretti: The
Business Model has not yet evolved to meet today’s realities ‘ the ad supported
television model is based on a captive audience trapped in linear time ‘ but
today viewers are liberated with extraordinary options that empower individual
control and increasingly asynchronous viewing.
Where do you see
media research moving in 5 years?

Petretti: Analytics,
Data Science and Data Visualization continue to become increasingly important
disciplines for media researchers ‘ we need to incorporate core competencies
from each to meet the demands of the new media world today and beyond.

The Media Research Industry has More Opportunities Than Ever Before

Insights have become a vehicle for influencing marketing and
ultimately, the world. That’s why next in our Insights as a Vehicle for
Influence interview series, we sat down with Sam Ford, a media executive,
consultant, and research affiliate with MIT Comparative Media Studies/Writing. In
our conversation, he shed some light on how the media industry has changed and
how media companies can do a better job at reaching the ‘new age’ consumer.
What is the state of
the media research industry in 2017?
Media research is in an interesting state at the moment. On
the one hand, there’s more to potentially research than ever before. Quantitatively,
there’s more to research than ever before, and organizations are finding new
ways to collect, synthesize, and make sense of all the data they are bringing
in.
However, with that influx of data, there still remains a
certain surety in what it’s saying, without necessarily enough questioning of
whether we’re asking the right questions. I feel like we’ve spent a lot of time
in the media industries gathering the data that is easiest to gather, or that
feels the most similar to what we’ve always gathered, leading organizations to
continue to be driven by impressions-and-reach-based models, when they may
often not be serving the needs of media companies, advertisers, or audiences
all that well.
Meanwhile, there are more opportunities than ever to do
great qualitative research, from audience experience projects to netnography,
but organizations often have not prioritized/invested in these methods. Many
organizations are making deeper investments into digital research, but all too
often the teams aren’t connected in the ways they should be to maximize
effectiveness and minimize redundancy. And, most importantly of all, the sort
of pattern recognition most important for good insights work may not be
positioned in many media companies in a way that allows it to contribute all it
can. After all, gathering data, qualitative insights, benchmarking, and
thoughts about future trends are all only useful if there are ways all of this
is being synthesized, analyzed, and brought to the table for key decisions being
made across the organization.
What have been the
biggest changes in the industry since you started your career?
I’ve spent years on different sides of these questions. I
began my career as a journalist. For the past 12 years, I’ve tackled these
questions most consistently from an academic’s perspective, looking at these
questions from outside the day-to-day needs of a particular media organization.
I have spent many years consulting with big brands from a marketing and PR
standpoint. And I spent much of the past two years working at a media company
operating in the network television, cable television, digital publishing, and
digital video distribution spaces.
Across all those vantage points, I’ve seen an industry
weathering a prolonged period of massive change, largely by finding ways to
hold as closely as it can to an ongoing semblance of normalcy’which is to be
expected in an industry where businesses can never truly close up shop. We’ve
seen an acceptance that you can’t fight change throughout the media industries,
but it has come along with a desire to cling to the broadcast model.

Have the influx of
social media and mobile made your job easier or harder?
Media companies, and advertisers, used to have very few
methods to really understand and listen to their audiences. We have all sorts
of new methods to be able to do that now. So, rather than having to create
aggregate stand-ins like customer segmentation profiles for our audience, we
have more access to those real people than ever before.
However, with that overabundance of information, we’ve
strangely found ourselves in a similar position as when we didn’t have enough
information’relying too often on ways of understanding audiences that may not
be the most insightful. In this case, it’s what’s easiest to collect or feel
concrete about, in a world where the overabundance of potential information
gives us the feeling of chaos.
How has the media
consumer changed in the past few years?
I don’t suppose people have changed all that much, in the
sense that the way audiences are using technology often mirrors things people
have always wanted to do but couldn’t necessarily do so as easily, or’if they
did’happened in ways that media companies or advertisers couldn’t easily
detect. People want to keep media content. People want to share media content.
People want to talk back to media content. People like to have as much control
as they can over their choices. Now that those options are becoming easier,
viewers have to think even more deeply about how they want to engage with
different types of programming.
If I can watch a series at my own pace, what do I want that
pace to be? Do I watch different types of programming at different types of
paces? When do I want to engage more deeply with media content, versus when do
I want to engage more passively? As media organizations put more effort into
engaging active audiences, it leaves those audiences to think about when,
where, and how they want to participate.

How can media companies do a better job
reaching the new age consumer?
I think we are only scratching the surface of what we can do
to really resonate with audiences. Most importantly, I believe, is finding as
many ways as possible to put ourselves in the shoes of the audience members who
are coming to us on purpose. As we get away from reach metrics as the
cornerstone of our business models, it allows us to think about how we as an
industry build around the sort of CRM models that drive subscription-based businesses’that
lead to fostering an active audience base engaging with you on purpose, and
with purpose.
No matter what type of media company you are, it seems that
this is the most important, stable, and lucrative part of the audience, but the
one that business models have all too often driven companies to neglect and
take for granted. When we are imagining each month’s digital traffic goals or
viewership goals as tabula rasa, then everything becomes focused on driving as
much general-audience interest as possible in what we do.
And for those organizations that do, for instance,
serialized programming or subscription models, there’s still a lot of work to
be done to really understand and think about everything the media company does
from the shoes of that active audience. How do they want to engage with the
content? What else do they want from the media brand? Why do they become
proselytizers? How do you identify audiences already engaged in similar content
but who haven’t yet found their way to you? In such a cluttered media landscape
as we have today, we can’t take for granted that people will quickly find us.
What is the biggest
challenge in the media industry today?
We have machines built around pushing what’s on/coming out
now, not for maintaining the longevity of content that has the potential for a
long shelf-life. In an era where a good portion of media content is available
for on-demand engagement later, we have to think about how we support machines
that are much better at monetizing media products over time, thinking about
investments in content for which the ROI may come slowly but which may continue
on for years, if supported in the right way.
We see glimpses of this in how subscription services think
about investment in original content production’and I recommend everyone read
Amanda Lotz’s new treatise Portals as
a way to dig more deeply into these questions. But media businesses, and the
research teams that support them, have to think about how to recalibrate the
machines we’ve built over the last few decades to these new types of questions.
Where do you see
media research moving in 5 years?
I hope to see media researchers continue to make great
strides in helping organizations create meaningful media texts which
demonstrate an understanding of what audiences want and how audiences want to
engage them. I hope to see research and insights work, as a function, taken
increasingly serious by corporate decision-makers who need the expertise that
the best of the research & insights field have to offer.
In an era where so much remains up in the air about the
media industries, and where trust in media companies has been a topic of common
popular discussion, it’s up to media researchers to think about the role they
can play as catalysts for a discussion about how we build models that serve
content producers, media companies, advertisers, and audiences better than what
we have right now. If we don’t take advantage of the current liminal moment for
the television industry (See M.J. Robinson’s work on this in the forthcoming
book, Television
on Demand
), then I don’t know what will make us seriously tackle these
questions until models start falling apart.

Sam Ford is a media
executive, consultant, and research affiliate with MIT Comparative Media
Studies/Writing. He also teaches in the Popular Culture Studies Program at
Western Kentucky University. In 2015-2016, he founded and ran the
Univision/Fusion Media Group Center for Innovation and Engagement, as VP,
Innovation & Engagement, for Fusion. He is also co-author of the 2013 book, Spreadable
Media: Creating Value and Meaning in a Networked Culture. More on his
work here.

#MediaInsights Day 3 Recap

Day 3 started with co-chair Bruce Friend recapping Day 2,
then introducing today’s first keynote speaker.
KEYNOTE 1 – MONEYBALL:
THE ART OF WINNING AN UNFAIR GAME

Paul Depodesta, CSO of Cleveland Browns,
engaged the audience with an overview that there’s a certain way that things
work.  Whether baseball, black jack, or
other situations in life, there’s always that ‘rule of thumb’ that we are
taught to follow.  However, sometimes the
‘rule’ doesn’t always work.  It’s all
about the process. Paul described a process/outcome quad:

??        
Good process/ Good outcome =
success
??        
Good process/ Bad outcome
= just unlucky
??        
Bad process/
Good outcome = get lucky once, but then rely on that luck to be successful
again
??        
Bad process/
Bad outcome = recipe for failure 

So, how do you
win with a lack of resources? 

Putting together a championship team is like cooking a
gourmet meal – you need the right ingredients. We’re always asking the naive questions- why is the market
down, why is this player struggling? We need a reason, but there not always is
a reason, so we try to explain by creating our own cause and relationships.
As with The
Oakland A’s in Moneyball, sometimes we need to throw out the old metrics, that
‘rule of thumb’ and start new.  Key
takeaways he learned from testing these new metrics were:         
??        
Find skillful
affordable talent to replace high priced starts
??        
Statistics can
be misleading
He drew
comparisons of scouting baseball players to testing programs.  Emotions drive our decisions, and we tend to
look for data to support and confirm these decisions, while dismissing any data
that contradicts what we believe.

Paul left us
with these 3 points: 
??        
become aware
of biases
??        
become
relentless in asking the naive question
??        
in the game of
uncertainty, how can we beat the house? Learn by previous failures to better
hit success.
KEYNOTE 2 – INSIGHTS
FROM THE 2016 ELECTION

The late morning keynote was actually broken
into 3 parts.  Robin Garfield of CNN
spoke first, and then we heard Dr. John Lapinski from NBC News, followed by a
Q&A with our 2 speakers.

Millennials told us they wanted a candidate who has a plan
to:
?? 
Create good paying jobs
?? 
Make healthcare more affordable

Millennials also told us they didn’t want a candidate who:
?? 
Represents ‘more of the same’
They were looking for a transformational candidate – someone
who will ‘change the government’, and that they were ‘done with the Clintons
and Bushes.’
Most Millennials liked Bernie Sanders, and both
Trump and Clinton were viewed negatively.

Not only was 2016 the most watched year on record in cable
news (with over 3 million total P2+ aggregate audience), but more people came
out to vote in 2016 than ever before.
??        
2000 ‘ 105.4
million total turnout (54.2% of eligible population that voted)
??        
2004 ‘ 122.3 million
(60.1%)
??        
2008 ‘ 131.3
million (61.6%)
??        
2012 ‘ 129,1
million (58.6%)
??        
2016 ‘ 136.6
million (59.0%)
We were show examples of ‘what-if’ scenarios, that
demonstrated how close the election really was.
While Clinton’s popular vote lead was just shy of 3 million
(65.8 million for Clinton compared to 63.0 million for Trump), the red/blue map
showed that the majority of Clinton’s popular vote came from New York and
California.  And the 2016 Electoral
College hinged on a handful of states, with Trump taking Florida and the Rust
Belt states (Iowa, Michigan, Ohio, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin).

KEYNOTE PANEL – CROSS PLATFORM MEASUREMENT AND THE FUTURE
OF MEDIA
                 
Jane Clark, from the Coalition for Innovative Media
Measurement, moderated this panel which included:
Jed Meyer (Univision), Jonathan Steuer (Omnicom),
Carol Hinnant (comScore), Steven Schmitt
(TiVo) and Kelly Abcarian (Nielsen).
The panel gave us a perspective of the industry from the
network, agency, and measurement side.  They
addressed the integrity of data and optimizing tools for better plans.  They talked about how there’s a constant
struggle trying to bring all measurement across all platforms together.
Kelly stressed how measurement needs to be a team sport.  Media companies are more and more starting to
own their own data, and that changes the dynamic of the industry.
There is a call from the network and agency side for duration
weighted viewable impressions across all platforms, and the measurement
companies just aren’t there yet.  The
question remains ‘ how do we get there?
The Day 3
afternoon Audience Insights breakouts were:
?? 
MULTICULTURAL
TV AUDIENCES ON TWITTER
‘ Meghann Elrhoul, Twitter
?? 
FULL SPECTRUM:
ILLUMINATING THE CONTENT PREFERENCES OF MULTICULTURAL AUDIENCE
‘ Thomas
Grayman, SpikeTV
The Innovations
in Media
breakouts were:
?? 
USING TRENDING
DATA TO UNCOVER THE WHITE SPACE
‘ Rob McLoughlin, POPSUGAR
Below are the Track 1 – Targeting Viewers case
studies:
QUANTIFYING
CROSS-PLATFORM ADVERTISING IMPACT IN LATIN AMERICA

ESPN’s David Hobbie gave us insight to David’s study focused on an advertising
campaign during this past year’s Olympics in Rio, and the impact and brand lift
experienced on ESPN Latin America.
THE STORY OF
KIDS MEDIA
The last case study track of the conference had Theresa
Pepe of Viacom give us an in depth look at kids’ data and… The
Story of Me.
We learned about kids under 11 and how they are the most
diverse kids ever. They make up 15.4% of the US population, and are extremely
persuasive. 
Theresa showed us a breakdown of these kids
focusing on:
??        
My beginning
??        
My world
??        
My family
??        
Myself
??        
My friends
??        
My tech
??        
My dreams
??        
Me in a nutshell. 

Since they were born these kids experienced: 
- The
first Black president 
- Terrorism
- Marriage equality 
- Great recession 
- YouTubers 
- On demand 
- Social Media 
- Device overload 
- Gender neutrality 

Their role models are their families’ and some
celebrities.  While 78% of girls look up
to mom, on 58% of boys look up to dad. 
26% said the look up to a grandparent, while the rest of their role
models included YouTube/Vine stars (19%), teacher (18%), brother (17%), sister
(15%), aunt/uncle/cousin (13%), actor/actress (10%), athlete (10%).
And they are busy!  6.2
hours of the day they are in school, while the rest of their day entails
sleeping (8.7 hours), eating/traveling (1.7 hours), organized sports/activities
(.9 hours), doing homework (.8 hours), and 6.4 hours going towards leisure (26%
of their day.)
In their free time, they watch TV (48%), play with toys
(43%), play video games (33%), and play outside (18%).
CONFERENCE
WRAP-UP

The Conference concluded with a wrap-up with the year’s
co-chairs and the advisory panel giving their feedback of the sessions,
discussing plans for next year’s conference, and taking questions from the
audience.

CNN & NBC News Share Where the 2016 Election Polls Went Wrong

Last week marked an important week in American history, the
inauguration of President Trump’ but our researcher minds can’t help but
wonder, what happened with the polling?
JUST ANNOUNCED – The
Media Insights & Engagement Conference brings CNN and NBC News to the
keynote stage to reveal Insights from the 2016 Presidential Election!

Join Robin Garfield, SVP, Research & Scheduling, CNN for
a comprehensive look at event participation, media consumption and public
opinion over the course of this unprecedented election cycle. From record
engagement in the presidential race to the dynamic environment heading into
election day, Robin will address what the data said and how these insights
compared to the outcome of the election.
John Lapinski focuses on how election polls and other
data-driven analyses did not fully predict the Trump phenomena. He’ll uncover
the lessons learned from the 2016 election, and how this will change how the
media analyzes and covers elections going forward.
Don’t miss your chance to truly understand the historical
outcome (at least to the mind of a researcher) of the 2016 election.
Read our recent blog
post on the 2016 Presidential Election: http://bit.ly/2jTI4Jp
Plus, hear from Facebook, NBC, HBO & Nielsen Social for
a panel discussion on How Consumers Engage with Programming Across Social
Platforms. See the full session description here: http://bit.ly/2iVS6dg
See who you’ll join at The Media Insights & Engagement
Conference: http://bit.ly/2j0JlyS
Use exclusive Blog
discount code MEDIA17BL for $100 off the current rate. Buy your tickets here: http://bit.ly/2j0JlyS
We hope to see you in Fort Lauderdale next week!
Cheers,
The Media Insights & Engagement Conference Team
@_MediaFusion
#MediaInsights

The Impact of Mobile Viewing on Sports Networks

The 2015 College Football Playoffs on New Year’s Day saw the cable TV viewing records be beaten not once, but twice. In fact, 28.271 million viewers (the most of all time) tuned into ESPN to watch the Ohio State Buckeyes defeat the number one seed Alabama Crimson Tide 42-35 in the Sugarbowl. This was preceded by the Oregon Ducks winning 59-20 against the Florida State Seminoles, which received 28.164 million viewers (the second most of all time). These viewing figures had increased by 51 percent and 150 percent, respectively from last year’s games.  
So, with figures like these why do many people believe that TV is dying out? Of course, events such as the College Football Playoffs do not occur every day, however I believe that TV is not dying out, but is simply adapting to the challengers that have recently emerged.
The recent popularity of companies such as Netflix has pushed many major channels to create ways to watch programs and stream live shows online. This has come about in correlation with the advancement of tablet and smartphone technology which now allow you to stream video. Daily media usage for tablets has increased from 21 minutes per day per person to 159 minutes from 2010-2014, smartphones have increased from 40 to 134 minutes, and television only increasing from 269-279 minutes.
ESPNis a prime example of the online charge as 1,728,000 unique viewers used Watch ESPN, its new online stream to watch the Football on New Year’s Day. That huge number of people will have been ESPN subscribers on cable, but were able to watch the game remotely despite not being at home with their cable box via Xbox, laptop, tablets and smartphones.
Despite this surge of online streaming. Bloomberg News discovered that U.S. pay TV subscriptions fell in 2013 from 100.9 million subscriptions to 100.8; not exactly a terrifying statistic for TV companies. Bloomberg’s Ian King points the finger at young people or ‘cord-nevers’ who have never paid for cable or satellite television. These ‘cord-nevers’ are mostly students or young graduates who turn to alternatives such as YouTube, Netflix or Google Play to watch their most loved shows at cheaper prices than a TV subscription.
However, more often than not these people’s families will have television sets; it was found that TV reaches nearly 90 percent of US households. So the recent drive to provide remote online streaming means that these people who may not be able to afford a TV subscription can still watch cable and satellite channels such as ESPN but in different locations. From personal experience, while I was at University in England I was able to watch the FA Cup final live (the English, less glamorous version of the Super Bowl!) while my family watched it at home, instead of having to watch season three of Friends for the ninth time on Netflix.
There is a belief amongst many people that these young ‘cord-nevers’ will continue to use cheaper alternatives as they are used to living without cable TV. I, myself am living in a foreign country on a small budget so television is not a priority, but I believe there will come a time where again I will be able to afford the luxury of satellite TV and I will want to provide it for a family and for them to watch remotely when they themselves can’t afford it.
Understandably, the emergence of cheaper alternatives to watch television shows has caused a decline for cable and satellite TV providers. I believe that the battle for TV domination will continue and TV will have to keep adapting to keep up with the increasingly mobile world but it will not become a thing of the past. People will continue to sit down on New Year’s day to watch Football Playoffs with 28 million other people.
About the Author: Harry Kempe, a marketing intern at IIR USA, who works on various aspects of the industry including social media, marketing analysis and media. He is a recent graduate of Newcastle University who previously worked for EMAP Ltd. and WGSN as a marketing assistant on events such as the World Architecture Festival, World Retail Congress and Global Fashion Awards. He can be reached at hkempe@IIRUSA.com.

GfK’s SVP of Media & Entertainment On How Viewing Devices and Services Impact Audience Measurement

In the first of The Media Insights Interview Series brought to you by The 2015 Media Insights & Engagement Conference, I caught up with David Tice, senior vice president, Media and Entertainment at GfK Custom Research, to discuss how the explosion of devices and services for viewing is impacting audience measurement.
This year, The Media Insights & Engagement Conference gives you an up-close, contextual view on the changing media experience to create better engagement strategies informed by actual viewing behaviors. This event gives you an opportunity to explore the new world of multi-platform, hyper-viewing in the post-disrupted media landscape, advance new insights and create future partnerships. This event is playing host to companies with some of the highest purchasing power in the industry, many of which spend more than $2.5 billion annually on advertising.
According to Tice, the two screen environment has made it easier for people to see an advertisement on TV and then go onto their smartphone or tablet and visit the website if they are interested. And, this in turn, has been really helpful to advertisers.

‘People’s use of television is, whether it’s younger or older folks, hasn’t changed a lot. What’s changing is the source of what they are watching,’ he said. ‘In the past it was your broadcast or cable networks, now people are using their TV sets to watch Netflix, Amazon or Hulu, because they want to use that bigger screen, that better quality sound than just watching it on a laptop or a tablet.’
Tice explained that in Gfk’s tracking research, each year they have seen that more digital viewers are using a TV set than are using computers.

Check out my full podcast interview with Tice below:

Want to hear more from David Tice? Don’t’ miss his session, ‘Insights into the effects of internet technology and video platform proliferation on viewing behaviors’ at The Media Insights & Engagement Conference at 2:00 pm on Wednesday, February 4, 2015. To learn more about this event or to register, please visit our website: http://bit.ly/1xS9zS0
About the Author: Amanda Ciccatelli, Social Media Strategist of the Marketing Division at IIR USA, has a background in digital and print journalism, covering a variety of topics in business strategy, marketing, and technology. Amanda is the Editor at Large for several of IIR’s blogs including Next Big DesignCustomers 1stDigital Impact, STEAM Accelerator and ProjectWorld and World Congress for Business Analysts, and a regular contributor to Front End of Innovation and The Market Research Event,. She previously worked at Technology Marketing Corporation as a Web Editor where she covered breaking news and feature stories in the technology industry. She can be reached at aciccatelli@iirusa.com. Follow her at @AmandaCicc.