Tag Archives: The Market Research Event

Using Design Thinking for a Family Glamping Trip

How can we make our marketing research projects even
better’?
is a question we often ask ourselves here at April Bell Research Group.  So, it’s awesome when you find a framework to
do just that! I first learned about Design Thinking from Lisa Helminiak, founder of a
human-centered design firm, Azul 7.  We met at a women-owned businesstraining event, where she turned me on
to some great resources from Stanford’s Institute ofDesign: d.school
Since then, we have
used this thinking in many of our research projects.  When I heard about Azul 7′s Design Thinking Workshop/Bootcamp, I decided to trek up to Minneapolis to attend.  I wanted to deepen my
understanding and find new ways to implement it into our research
practice.  What I discovered is that
Design-Thinking is more than a ‘process’, it’s a way of life.
This mindset includes:
  • Focusing on what others need
  • Feeling free to experiment while working through
    a process
  • Getting really clear about what you’re trying to
    solve.
  • Having a ‘bias toward action’
  • Radial collaboration

It’s a simple process to reshape thinking. You state the challenge, and then
follow 5 steps ‘ Empathize, Define, Ideate, Prototype and Test ‘ to elevate
creative thinking.
Creativity is an
essential skill for leaders trying to make a difference. Yet developing the
ability to think and act creatively remains a thorny challenge. While there’s a
hunger for skill development, elevating creative confidence doesn’t happen via
traditional modes of executive education.
Tim Brown, IDEO’s President and CEO
Here’s how I incorporated Design Thinking as I planned my
trip to the Boot Camp!
State the Challenge:  How can
I take 3+ days away for training when I have so many obligations with work and
family?
The Steps:
  • Empathize
    ‘ immerse yourself, observe what people are doing, how they’re doing it and
    why. Discover other’s views.  Sidenote: this is MUCH easier to do
    professionally as a moderator than it is with your immediate family!!! 
    But here’s what I got from the ‘empathy
    gathering’ stage:

o  
My husband and daughter didn’t want me to drag
them along on a trip where I was unavailable for most of the day.
o  
They also didn’t want me to go on a trip unless
it was a ‘real vacation.’
o  
They wanted to go ‘camping’ ‘ I did not.
o  
I didn’t want to feel guilty about going.
o  
I wanted to create a great experience for
everyone.

  •  Define
    ‘ this is tricky because you’re still not solving ‘ you’re just unpacking what
    you learned, and getting clarity on WHAT needs to be solved. ‘Unpack’ all of
    your learnings, then translate these into a Point of View statement ‘ (User)needs‘ (Need) ‘because’ (Insight)

o  
My definition: 
?? 
The Family
(User) needs’
?? 
‘to find individual
activities while vacationing together
(Need) because’
?? 
‘we want
to be together yet have our own idea of what ‘fun’ looks like!
(Insight)
  • Ideate ‘ our ‘family’ brainstorm looked a little different than the typical innovation ideation sessions we facilitate with our clients but let’s just say our little familia ‘tried‘ to build on each other’s ideas.  And we ‘tried’ not to judge each other’s opinions (some of us were better than others but I’m not pointing any fingers!)  And, my 5 year old is DEFINITELY the most creative and best ‘ideator’ of the family!
  • Prototype
    ‘ You stop talking (and thinking) in this step – and start building.  It’s a challenge because our nature ‘ at
    least mine ‘ is to get it right, get it perfect before showing others. This
    step forces the reverse thinking.  To get
    better, you must build/create something to test SO THAT IT CAN get better for
    the user! 
  • Test ‘ Then,
    we tested our first ever 10-day Family Glamping + Training trip!  Our user testing was ‘doing it.’  Would we do it differently next time?  Yes, we would tweak a few things like making
    sure our A/C in the camper was working properly before departing.  And allowing 2 weeks for the trip, not 10
    days’but we learned a lot.  This was our
    ‘prototype’:

1.    
Pull camper from Dallas to Oklahoma, spent
our first night in Sequoyah State Park in Hulbert, OK
2.    
Migrated
to Des Moines, IA where we played with our friends, then left our daughter +
camper to play longer.
3.    
Husband
and I drove on to Minneapolis where I attended Azul’s Design-Thinking Boot Camp and
hubby happily biked in a city with some of the best biking trails in the US.  
4.    
Then,
we made our way back home, picking up our daughter and camper in Iowa
5.    
Spent
2 more nights in Kansas before heading back to Dallas.
Here’s a visual map we made
with Fotor, another fun tool we’ve added to our tool kit. That
and PicMonkey are
both great  at quickly helping you bring
ideas to life visually for ‘quick DIY design needs.’
Loved the Boot
Camp. And Design Thinking has not only enhanced our innovation projects but
also helped us create a mindset for innovation in our boutique business and even personally!
April Bell. Owner, Researcher, Facilitator and the ‘force of nature’ at April Bell Research Group, a full service boutique market research agency helping researchers shine.

Future of Insights Study Finds Passive Data Deficit

GfK/IIR Industry Study Highlights
Five Research Industry Imperatives
By Marc Dresner, Senior Editor, IIR
Could the last few years
of talk about the Big Data revolution have just been lip service? 
David Krajicek
GfK COO Consumer
Experiences North America David Krajicek stunned the TMRE audience this morning
with the revelation that only about six percent of client-side researchers and
suppliers currently employ passively collected data.
Moreover, 68% said they do not believe they will begin using
passive data collection over the next two years.
But in almost absurdly
stark contrast, one-third of respondents from each respective party said the single most important source of data
for insights creation two years from now will be ‘consumer-specific data
collected passively.’
Krajicek unveiled these
and other key findings from 700 market research clients and suppliers surveyed
for the Future of Insights study by GfK in partnership with IIR (producer of
The Market Research Event) during the opening keynote session of TMRE 2015
today.
The results highlight
significant gaps and disparities in the field of consumer research today that
Krajicek called somewhat worrisome for the future of both the profession and
the industry.

‘While the industry desires
to evolve with the consumer and tap into the scores of behavioral data left
behind by an increasingly plugged-in society,
the ability to
implement these new methodologies is still very much lacking.’
‘While the industry is ambitious in its desire to evolve
with the consumer and tap into the scores of behavioral data left behind by an
increasingly plugged-in society, the ability to implement these new
methodologies is still very much lacking, and the industry is still reliant on
the current modes of data collection,’ Krajicek said.
Based on the
findings, Krajicek reported the industry’s future rests with three ‘C’s”Collection,
Curation and Communication’around which he offered five industry imperatives:
1.      
Speed It Up!
‘We need to run‘not walk’and chew gum,’ said Krajicek, pointing to a ‘misalignment’
of priorities between clients and suppliers around speed vs. innovation. ‘Clients
want innovative methodologies, but first they want everything faster,’ he
emphasized. ‘Research providers need to concentrate on speeding up the current
deliverable while they’re developing new tools.’
2.      
Focus on Return on Insights
Research clients are three times more
likely than providers to focus on replacing traditional research approaches and
sources, while suppliers tend to think of innovation in incremental terms.
Krajicek noted that what’s missing from the discussion is why we’re innovating.
 ‘At no other time in history have we had
access to the level of information we have today to understand human behavior. Are
we living up to that potential’? Krajicek said. ‘We, as an industry, need to
have a very honest and transparent conversation about the value we’re bringing
bring to the table.’
3.      
Help Wanted: Insights Architect
The kinds of competencies required to meet the
demands of the near future are less around data science, analytics and methodological
expertise and more about the ability to ‘connect dots and curate an information
and insight ecosystem,’ said Krajicek.
4.      
Passive Data Rising Rapidly
Collectively,
clients and suppliers split almost evenly (about 30% across the board) on what
data source would be most important for insights creation two years from now’passively
collected data or survey data. Krajicek noted that with only 6% of respondents
using the former, we’d be looking at a pretty rapid adoption curve.
5.      
Driving
Action Through Stories
About
30% of respondents chose ‘storytelling’ as the greatest competency gap in
research today. Krajicek observed that ”storytelling’ is code for activation’We
are talking about being impactful in our communications, which suggests that
currently research is not impactful enough.’
Krajicek concluded
with a call to the industry and an invitation to continue the discussion. You
can expect to hear more on this initiative moving forward!

Editor’s note: TMRE attendees received a brief summary of
top line findings during Krajicek’s session. Download a copy
here.

Ps. GfK plans to release an in-depth report soon. Stay
tuned!

ABOUT THE AUTHOR/INTERVIEWER
Marc Dresner is IIR USA’s sr. editor and special communication project lead. He is the former executive editor of Research Business Report, a publication for the market research and consumer insights industry. He may be reached at mdresner@iirusa.com. Follow him @mdrezz.

Six Key Factors that Drive Word of Mouth: Podcast

‘Contagious’
Author Explains How to Make a Message Viral
By Marc
Dresner, Senior Editor, IIR
It’s
well understood that word-of-mouth is an extremely influential marketing
medium, but just how powerful may surprise you.

According
to Wharton Professor of Marketing Jonah Berger, $1 invested in WOM may actually
be worth up to 10 times that of a
conventional ad dollar

Jonah Berger

‘Word-of-mouth underlies most of the decisions people
make.’
‘Word-of-mouth underlies most of the decisions people
make,’ he told The Research Insighter.
As such,
a good read on WOM may be one of the most valuable forms of consumer
intelligence one could hope for, but are we really getting one?
Researchers
and marketers have increasingly fixated on passive capture of WOM through
technology’social media analytics, NLP, etc.
But
despite all of the hype around Facebook, Twitter, etc., Berger’author of the
best-seller ‘Contagious: Why Things Catch On”points
out only about 7% of WOM
happens online
.
This
isn’t to say that social media isn’t a good WOM proxy, but Berger advises not
to get too hung up on technology and media platforms’they come and go.
‘We need
to stop thinking in terms of technology and start thinking in terms of
psychology.’

‘We all understand word-of-mouth affects sales, but most businesses aren’t
being scientific about how to harness it and use those customer insights to
drive their sales,’ he explained.
‘We need
to stop thinking about WOM in terms of technology and start thinking in terms
of psychology,’ Berger said.
In this podcast for The
Research Insighter 
interview
series, Jonah Berger
 shares his ‘STEPPS’ framework and the six
factors that prompt people to pass something on…
Listen
to the podcast!

Download
the transcript!

Editor’s note: Jonah Berger will be speaking at TMRE 2015‘The Market Research Event’now
in its 13th year as the largest, most comprehensive research conference
in the world taking place November 2-4 in Orlando.
For information or to
register, please visit
TheMarketResearchEvent.com.

Ps. SAVE $100 when you register with code TMRE15BL!

ABOUT THE AUTHOR/INTERVIEWER
Marc Dresner is IIR USA’s sr. editor and special communication project lead. He is the former executive editor of Research Business Report, a publication for the marketing research and consumer insights industry. He may be reached at mdresner@iirusa.com. Follow him @mdrezz.

Consumer Insight :: Go Deep or Go Home

We meet companies and non-profits who have been marketing to the same
lists for years. Often, these lists and the assumptions about the
people on their lists are more than a decade old. These aged lists may
have been scrubbed, but that is simply for those who have fallen off the
grid, one way or another. This point should be obvious: there are major problems with this scenario.

1. First off, organizations marketing to the same list for years lose
the feel of how their buyers make decisions. Their selling instincts
dull, and then they tend to think of names on the list as objects rather
than subjects with rich, full lives, motivations, and choices. In
essence, they lose their hunting impulse, their sense of courtship, and
reduce a possible valuable customer relationship into a vague,
impersonal slot machine, settling for a single transaction with low
odds.

2. Second, people are dynamic, not static. If these organizations put
their prospects into a rigid category instead of knowing them on a
deeper level, they will be marketing to a snapshot that is no longer
valid. Think of yourself or your children 10 years ago to demonstrate
this point. People are one of the most progressive species on the
planet. Fortunes can be made, lost, and regained in a decade’and if your
customer information keeps the same basic inputs, you are out of touch
with reality.

3. Third, your weakest competitors are marketing to the exact same list.
Incredibly, they are marketing to them with a similar value
proposition, brand promise, feature and benefit set, and price range
(perhaps with a few incremental differences, but nothing really
discernible to them). They, too, are eking out a living on the after
fumes of cobwebbed insights from a decade ago, and cannot think outside
of the confines of a strategy set when the world was a different place.

4. Fourth, the most egregious sin: They don’t have any actionable
insights about the market, the people in the market, the trends and
forces that shape the market, and they do not renew and transform their
innovation and marketing efforts to position as a leader in their
category. This is the classic deadly sin of sloth. If it exists in your
organization, eradicate it or risk extinction.

Face it: this is the post-industrial world, the economic era of
innovation. These innovations are steeped in human-to-human
valves’offering products, services, causes, and messages that add value
to a person’s life. You have to know a person to go this deep. You must
immerse yourself in their world and get out of your conference room to
comprehend where and how you can really add value.

Call it a deep dive, a voice of the customer, an ethnography,
narrative insight based marketing research, field studies, whatever’just
get out of your own head and your rut-like routines and get inside the
homes, routines, rituals, and hearts of your people. Honor those that
buy from you or give to you, as subjects with dynamic lives.

By investing in them, you create a win-win relationship. You offer
something of value to Joe, Betty, John, Veena, and Amir’and they, in
return, return to your offering as part of the natural course of their
lives. This quid pro quo, these repeat sales, will not happen if you
keep playing the old lists game and never spend time with your prospect
base.

Go deep.

Continuing the Conversation: The Power of Predictive Analytics

Connecting the best in insights from around the world at The Market Research Event (TMRE) showed that:

- People are a catalyst for inspiration. More than 1,300 leading executives and research professionals from across the globe gathered to experience the latest technologies and the most breakthrough applications of insights.

- Experience is a catalyst for disruption. Only when you purposefully change your surroundings, can you truly open your mind to new ideas.

- Stories are a catalyst for action. Over 150 cross-industry, research and insights experts shared best practices on insight-driven innovation.

To continue the stories and conversations generated from TMRE’s Big Data & Predictive Analytics sessions, check out “I Know What You’ll Do Next Summer: Why Marketers Must Embrace Predictive Analytics” by Andrew Frank.

How are you “applying the power of predictive analytics to real-time digital marketing?”

Peggy L. Bieniek, ABC is an Accredited Business
Communicator specializing in corporate communication best practices. Connect
with Peggy on LinkedIn, Twitter, Google+, and on her website at www.starrybluebrilliance.com.

 
 
 

Live from #TMRE14: Leveraging Superstar Products to Build Brands

Fresh from the heels of the New York Food and Wine Festival (NYCWFF) was Cynthia Soledad of Whirlpool talking about bringing the iconic KitchenAid Brand, a superstar in its category, to build other brands. For, like many feel, KitchenAid is more than a mixer – it is a kitchen lifestyle brand.

The cycle that unraveled from understanding the consumers of three segments ranging from enthusiasts to obsessers was as follows: Aspire (the emotion of trying to do something), seek (the quest for finding the right products, which is where KitchenAid comes into the picture), learn (using the tools as your “sous-chefs” as the brand puts it) and master (to become a chef in your own right). An interesting cycle with the analogy of being an engineer or any corporate career by day, but a chef by night.

The findings reflected that in the kitchen, you are an appreciator as well as a critic. However, the three key truths that were found were that tools from Kitchen Aid are important for creative facilitation, identity reflection and usage outcome. Of which, usage outcome was most important with both small and large appliances.

A fascinating tale of unraveling consumer stories through primarily qualitative research, the two lessons that stay in my mind that can be applied to virtually any category are: consumers are born inherently irrational, and a brand can truly win by playing on the intersection of its equity with deep human needs.

Sourabh Sharma,
Communication & Social Media Research Expert at SKIM, an international
consultancy and marketing research agency, has a background in engineering,
marketing and finance from the University of Pennsylvania, and the Wharton
School and Rotterdam School of Management. Having worked in marketing and
product development at L’Oreal, followed by a stint in management consulting,
he now passionately enjoys the world of social media, and can be found on every
platform with his alias sssourabh. He is a food critic and a fashion writer,
and documents these alongside strategy on his blog called
3FS. He may be reached at s.sharma@skimgroup.com.
Follow him on
@sssourabh.
Sourabh Sharma,
Communication & Social Media Research Expert at SKIM, an international
consultancy and marketing research agency, has a background in engineering,
marketing and finance from the University of Pennsylvania, and the Wharton
School and Rotterdam School of Management. Having worked in marketing and
product development at L’Oreal, followed by a stint in management consulting,
he now passionately enjoys the world of social media, and can be found on every
platform with his alias sssourabh. He is a food critic and a fashion writer,
and documents these alongside strategy on his blog called
3FS. He may be reached at s.sharma@skimgroup.com.
Follow him on
@sssourabh. – See more at: http://themarketresearcheventblog.iirusa.com/2014/04/crowdsourcing-and-social-media.html#sthash.SDOBGemC.dpuf
Sourabh Sharma,
Communication & Social Media Research Expert at SKIM, an international
consultancy and marketing research agency, has a background in engineering,
marketing and finance from the University of Pennsylvania, and the Wharton
School and Rotterdam School of Management. Having worked in marketing and
product development at L’Oreal, followed by a stint in management consulting,
he now passionately enjoys the world of social media, and can be found on every
platform with his alias sssourabh. He is a food critic and a fashion writer,
and documents these alongside strategy on his blog called
3FS. He may be reached at s.sharma@skimgroup.com.
Follow him on
@sssourabh. – See more at: http://themarketresearcheventblog.iirusa.com/2014/04/crowdsourcing-and-social-media.html#sthash.SDOBGemC.dpuf
Sourabh Sharma,
Communication & Social Media Research Expert at SKIM, an international
consultancy and marketing research agency, has a background in engineering,
marketing and finance from the University of Pennsylvania, and the Wharton
School and Rotterdam School of Management. Having worked in marketing and
product development at L’Oreal, followed by a stint in management consulting,
he now passionately enjoys the world of social media, and can be found on every
platform with his alias sssourabh. He is a food critic and a fashion writer,
and documents these alongside strategy on his blog called
3FS. He may be reached at s.sharma@skimgroup.com.
Follow him on
@sssourabh. – See more at: http://themarketresearcheventblog.iirusa.com/2014/04/crowdsourcing-and-social-media.html#sthash.SDOBGemC.dpuf

Sourabh Sharma,
Communication & Social Media Research Expert at SKIM, an international
consultancy and marketing research agency, has a background in engineering,
marketing and finance from the University of Pennsylvania, and the Wharton
School and Rotterdam School of Management. Having worked in marketing and
product development at L’Oreal, followed by a stint in management consulting,
he now passionately enjoys the world of social media, and can be found on every
platform with his alias sssourabh. He is a food critic and a fashion writer,
and documents these alongside strategy on his blog called
3FS. He may be reached at s.sharma@skimgroup.com.
Follow him on
@sssourabh. – See more at: http://themarketresearcheventblog.iirusa.com/2014/04/crowdsourcing-and-social-media.html#sthash.SDOBGemC.dpuf

What Samsung Looks for in Research Agencies

Insights Chief Says Innovation and Communication Key for Preferred Vendors

By Marc Dresner, IIR
For consumer researchers at most corporations, cultivating
rich partnerships with research agencies has become absolutely imperative.
Transactional relationships won’t do. We hear over and over
again that companies want a partner who understands their industry and their
unique business needs, and who can function as an extension of the research
organization.
Tim Benner

This is certainly true for Tim Benner, Director of Consumer
Insights and Analytics
, and his team at Samsung Telecommunications America.

‘Mobile technology and the market move very quickly. Having preferred vendors
allows us to execute research with the speed we need,’ said Benner.
But with so much change taking place both in the mobile industry and in research, generally, Benner says partners need to keep very current methodologically, because searching out new research capabilities can be burdensome. 
He also needs his agency partners to be proficient influencers. 
This is a point I hear all the time from the client side: Methodological expertise is not enough; be able to tell and sell a research story. 
In this episode of The Research Insighter podcast interview series,
Benner discusses what he looks for in a research agency partner, including:

-          Specialization

-         
Innovation


-         
Communication savvy


Listen to the podcast…


Editor’s note: Tim Benner will be speaking on the ‘Intersection of Big Data and Little Data’ at The Market Research Event 2014
October 20-22 in Boca Raton, Florida.
For more
information or to register, please visit www.themarketresearchevent.com




ABOUT THE INTERVIEWER 
Marc Dresner is IIR USA’s sr. editor and special communication project lead. He is the former executive editor of Research Business Report, a confidential newsletter for the marketing research and consumer insights industry. He may be reached at mdresner@iirusa.com. Follow him @mdrezz.

Inside the Annual TMRE NGMR Disruptive Innovator and EXPLOR Awards

TMRE 2014 is a proud host
of two of the market research industry’s most prestigious awards: The EXPLOR Award and NGMR Disruptive Innovator
Award
, which recognize outstanding and innovative work in the market
research industry today.  I recently sat
down with Tom Anderson, Managing Partner, Anderson Analytics ‘ OdinText and
Chuck Miller, President, Digital Marketing & Measurement, LLC (DM2), to discuss the awards and why TMRE keeps them coming back.
So, where did these prestigious awards begin?
Back in early 2007 The Next Generation Market Research
networking group was founded – the first market research group of its kind
created to address the stagnant slow moving situation at the time. The group
mission stated, ‘The market has changed, the customers have changed, why should
consumer insight be the same’? 
‘Initially, it was a group for those of us who wanted to use
more advanced analytics and work across different and larger data,’ Anderson
explained. ‘As time went on, and everyone started talking about ‘Innovation.’
the group actually played quite a different role as well. Many of the members
are very senior and experienced research folks, and while welcoming new
techniques and methods from the data and text mining fields for instance, we
also wanted to vet these new techniques being suggested to make sure they were
methodologically sound and actually useful.’
The NGMR Disruptive
Innovator Award
Today, with more than 20,000 members, NGMR remains a
resource for these types of discussions, and NGMR Disruptive Innovator Award
celebrates not just Innovation for the sake of Innovation, but Innovation that
truly is disruptive.  The award recognizes
companies and individuals that have demonstrated outstanding leadership as
change agents and made significant contributions to harnessing disruptive
innovation to drive research industry progress. This year’s winners will
receive a complimentary pass to TMRE and the opportunity to present the winning
case study during this session.
‘This is an award by researchers for researchers, and it’s
not just about innovation for the sake of innovation, it’s about sound
innovation that makes sense for our field,’ said Anderson.
For the past 15 years, EXPLOR has been a showcase for
research innovation, highlighting some of the best research in our industry. Other times it highlighted groundbreaking work that was
meaningful to the client but that hasn’t become mainstream ‘ such as assessing
consumer behaviors using GPS enabled shopping carts.  ‘In all cases,
EXPLOR gives us exposure to great research creativity, and generally a glimpse
of things to come,’ he explained.
Today, The EXPLOR award recognizes breakthrough innovation
in technology as applied to market research.  This award is a case study competition, so it
highlights a real-world research problem and solution.  According to
Miller, case studies must be formed around a client-driven business problem,
then demonstrate how the client and supplier team applied new techniques to
deliver insight.  So, EXPLOR is less about using a cool new tool, and more
about how innovation solved an important problem for a client organization. This
year’s winner will receive a complimentary pass to TMRE and the opportunity to
present the winning case study during this session. This year, the EXPLOR Award
is brought to you by DM2. 
Anderson and Miller value sound innovation and want to reward
it, but they also realize that the word ‘Disruptive Innovation’ can mean a lot
of different things, and they can’t really tell how disruptive something will
be until it’s been around for a while. They favor individuals and companies
that have demonstrated that they can be useful and widely adopted, but also like
to see brand new software and methods and try to give them the benefit of the
doubt while scrutinizing them under the methodological lens.
So, what does winning one of these prestigious awards mean
for a company or an individual? There are many nominations each year, so even
being selected as a finalist is something to be proud of, according to
Anderson. ‘In a competitive industry such as this, it’s obviously beneficial to
point to an award like NGMR as a sign of distinction. Last year a prominent
market research blogger even referred to the NGMR award as ‘The Nobel Prize of
the Marketing Research Industry.’
People are always thankful EXPLOR provided them an opportunity
to share their passion about a tool or technique, or their company as a whole,
according to Miller. ‘The award can call attention to very deserving employees
to help them advance their careers, but at the end of the day I know these
people are more driven by their passion around innovation ‘ and the desire to
do things that have never been done.’
For this year, nominations are open and Anderson and Miller
have already received a couple of interesting submissions. Unfortunately, most
submissions come in during the final week, which does not give them any time to
request additional information from an applicant if needed. If you are considering
applying, you are encouraged to apply early. 
Additionally, the committee members each evaluate and rate several
submissions, so they also encourage visuals or videos etc. if available. 
‘The hardest thing is selecting one single winner in one of
our three categories, when there are two or three individuals or firms that are
close,’ explained Anderson. ‘That’s why we do encourage people to resubmit the
next year. We have had winners who won the third time/year around!’
Two things excite Miller about the EXPLOR award on an annual
basis. ‘First, I really enjoy discussing with the judges all of the
creative applications people are using in our business today.  It’s always
a broad array of techniques used to address a variety of business problems, which
is fascinating,’ he said. ‘Second, and more importantly, it’s really exciting
to see the winning team receive recognition for the great job they’ve
done.  Generally there is some risk-taking involved as they’ve applied
creativity to solve a problem, so it’s great to see their work validated and
their efforts rewarded.’
Each year Anderson participates in TMRE because to him, TMRE
is the largest marketing research event with the biggest key notes and venue,
which has continued to be the logical home for The Nobel Prize of Marketing
Research.  In addition, the post award
break out session with the winners, which this year will be moderated by a
known industry disruptor and entrepreneur, Kristin Luck, President & CMO at
Decipher and founder of WIRe (Women in Research).  
Kristin Luck,
President & CMO at Decipher and founder of WIRe
According to Miller, TMRE is a great forum for the EXPLOR
Awards because it brings together the highest caliber client and provider-side
researchers. He added, ‘These folks are the change agents in their
organizations who can benefit from exposure to leading-edge research
innovation.  It’s great that TMRE and the EXPLOR/NGMR awards push our
industry forward in this way.’
All EXPLOR Award and
NGMR Disruptive Innovator Award entries must be received by September 22, 2014. For
award submission details, click here:
http://bit.ly/1pxBUKR
To register for TMRE
2014 this October in Boca Raton, FL click here:
http://bit.ly/XM1S2P

About the Author:
Amanda Ciccatelli, Social Media Strategist of the 
Marketing Division at IIR USA, has a background in digital and print
journalism, covering a variety of topics in business strategy, marketing, and
technology. Amanda is the Editor at Large for several of IIR’s blogs
including 
Next Big DesignCustomers 1stDigital Impact, STEAM Accelerator and ProjectWorld
and World Congress for Business Analysts
, and a regular contributor to Front End of Innovation and The Market Research Event,.
She previously worked at Technology Marketing Corporation as a Web Editor where
she covered breaking news and feature stories in the technology industry. She
can be reached at aciccatelli@iirusa.com. Follow her at @AmandaCicc. 

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