Tag Archives: The Consumerist

Subway Launches Text Message Ordering In NYC

Now you can “Text Fresh” thanks to the Subway’s unveiling of text message ordering in NYC. Hungry cube dwellers need not waste precious time away from the office waiting in line–they need to simply text and enjoy. According to The Consumerist, it sounds convenient once you’ve jumped through the registration hoops, although the clear downside is you’re storing credit card info on a third-party site, which is the sort of thing that always seems to come back up as a bad idea when a company’s database is breached. If you’re comfortable with that risk, however, have at it.

Do you see more companies doing this in the future? What about using social media networks to order food? Let us know your thoughts here or on Twitter.

Bank of America Using Twitter to Solve Customer Problems

Bank of America has taken a new approach to customer service–Twitter. The banking giant, now in a bit of hot water thanks to Merrill Lynch, has decided to reach out to the masses in with help in only “140 characters.” Many readers on Consumerist.com have reported quick help with the website, refunds in fees and cancellations. Check out the Twitter helper at: twitter.com/BofA_help

Nintendo’s great customer service

Recently at The Consumerist, Alex Jarvis wrote in about the exceptional customer experience some had with Nintendo and their broken Wii. The customer had the game consult for two years, and green artifacts starting popping up on the screen when he was playing two specific games. Upon checking on the internet, his warranty was out, but called customer service, and they told him to send his Wii back in with the UPS packaging label they emailed him. When he received the Wii back, he not only had a new motherboard in his consult, but the two games that were malfunctioning as well, at no cost to the customer.

Customer service help? $15 please

With a struggling economy, many companies are trying to find the extra dollars to keep going. At The Consumerist, they tell about the latest fee at Mervyn’s, a department store that’s currently closing all its locations. One customer called to pay her bill over the phone, and was informed that she’d have to pay $15 for any service over the phone, whether or not she was calling to pay her bill or addressing another issue.

Even though the company is going out of business, they’re still not treating their customers with much respect. What other ways have you seen customer service falter due to the current economic situation?