Tag Archives: storytelling

Here Be (Inner) Dragons: The Art Of Storytelling

Day 3 at TMRE ended with a charming and funny keynote on
storytelling, by a man who’s lived and worked it for decades. Francis Glebas
has decades of experience at Disney and Dreamworks in their visual development and
storyboarding departments, and has written books about his work there (Directing The Story and The Animator’s Eye). 
90s kids in
particular would be impressed by his visual CV: helping nail the look of
Aladdin’s nemesis Jafar, and storyboarding the bittersweet parting scene in Pocahontas. Now Glebas storyboards Sofia The First, a show about a girl who
becomes a princess by accident. He shared stories from his career and spun them
into useful advice for research and marketing professionals looking to tell a
few tales of their own.
Presentations about storytelling tend to take two routes.
One is to focus on story archetypes
the basic concepts that sit behind almost all the stories we tell ‘ like ‘rags
to riches’ or ‘boy meets girl’. The other is to talk about story structure ‘ the shape of stories, and
the rise and fall of the protagonist’s fortunes. The two things cross over
somewhat ‘ ‘tragedy’ is both an archetype (a story with a sad ending) and a
particular kind of inversion of a typical story shape, as a protagonist rises
then falls, instead of the other way around.
Glebas had things to say about both topics. A storyboarder ‘
the person who draws out the way scripted action is going to look on screen, as
if it was a comic book ‘ has an enormous effect on how a story reaches its
audience. For instance, he worked on Pocahontas throughout its development ‘ he
was in the room when it was pitched, and he went on to storyboard the pivotal
scene where John Smith and Pocahontas must leave each other. 
This scene, and
the story as a whole, had been pitched as a Romeo And Juliet tragic love story,
but trying to draw it that way ended up flat. Then Glebas realised ‘ it’s not
tragic, it’s bittersweet. Not Romeo And Juliet, but Casablanca. He redrew the
storyboards to make the characters’ love more obvious and their agency more
apparent ‘ and it worked.
The lesson is that having ‘a story’ isn’t enough. You have to
be telling the right story, to get the emotional tone right and leave people
feeling happy. 
Glebas also talked about effective structure. His watchword
is the ‘four Ws’ which explain the arc of a great story. It all starts with a
WISH ‘ something the protagonist wants. But then they do something WRONG ‘
overreach themselves, make a mistake, find themselves up against too strong an
enemy. It’s then that things are at their WORST ‘ they have not only not got
their wish, but they’ve lost what they had. 
But, as Glebas put it, ‘when you
are in hell, you reorganise or die’. And the story takes a dramatic upswing
(like the neck of a fire-breathing dragon) into WONDER, where by making things
right again the protagonist gets more than they ever dreamed possible.
WISH-WRONG-WORST-WONDER. Glebas presented this structural guide
as part motivational lesson (‘find your inner dragon and ignite your fire!’)
and part pragmatic tip on how to structure stories when it’s your turn to tell
them. It was a warm, wise presentation. 
As with every storytelling guide the precise
set of archetypes and the exact ‘universal’ structure varies ‘ but once you’ve
seen a few that nets out as a feature, not a bug. Storytelling guides are like
diets ‘ it’s a case of finding the one that suits you, not hunting vainly for one
that never fails.

Discover Your Stories in Big Data

Photo: tookapic.com
‘The purpose of a storyteller is not to tell
you how to think, but to give you questions to think upon.’
- Brandon Sanderson,
science fiction and fantasy author

Data on its own has no meaning. It takes a skillful storyteller or team of storytellers to give data meaning. Your data scientist or data team needs to fill that vital role for business success.

In “Why Your Data Scientists Need to be Storytellers and How
to Get Them There,”
 Laura Patterson says that “unless all that data can be effectively collected,
analyzed, and transformed into meaningful and actionable insights’and then used
to tell a compelling, actionable story’it is as useless as salt water to
someone who is parched and adrift on the ocean.”
Learn what it takes to transform your data through compelling storytelling during these sessions at the Marketing Analytics & Data Science Conference, (MADS) on June 8-10 in San Francisco, California:

- “What’s the Story With Big Data?” presented by Earl Taylor, Chief Marketing Officer, Marketing Science Institute
- “Your Data Doesn’t Always Tell the Story” presented by Nancy Kazdan, Founder & CEO, Market Share International
Join us at MADS to learn, network and share best practices with the most influential leaders in data science and analytics. Stay connected at #MADSCONF.

Session descriptions are from the Marketing Analytics & Data Science Conference brochure.

Peggy L. Bieniek, ABC is an Accredited Business Communicator specializing in corporate communication best practices. 

Connect with Peggy on LinkedInTwitterGoogle+, and on her website at www.starrybluebrilliance.com

What Gives Meaning to Digital Media?

Photo by Dustin Groh.

‘The difference between real life and a story is that life has significance, while a story must have meaning. The former is not always apparent, while the latter always has to be, before the end.’ - Vera Nezarian, author and artist

Storytelling is a powerful way to communicate about your business to all of your audiences. It can also help to transform how you do business. This is especially evident in digital media. 

For example, in “Transform Your Reporting Using the Elements of Storytelling,” by Alicia Houselog, senior media planner at space150, she explains how she creates her reports by combining data and storytelling elements to help her clients “understand the bigger story of how digital media has actually affected their business.”

Want to learn more about the influence of storytelling in the digital media landscape? 

Join keynote speaker Joe Sabia, Head of Digital Development, Conde Nast Entertainment, as he presents “Speaking the Digital Dialect in the Language of Storytelling” on Feb. 2 during the Media Insights & Engagement Conference in Fort Lauderdale, Florida.

During this session, you’ll learn key insights into what makes Internet video tick and stand out on the Internet. 

Register today!

Join our network and stay connected all year long:
- twitter.com/@_MediaFusion
- linkedin.com/Media Insights & Engagement
- facebook.com/Media Insights & Engagement


Session descriptions are from the Media Insights & Engagement Conference brochure.


Peggy L. Bieniek, ABC is an Accredited Business Communicator specializing in corporate communication best practices. 

Connect with Peggy on LinkedInTwitterGoogle+, and on her website at www.starrybluebrilliance.com

How to Tell a Research Story

The job of research has clearly evolved. Historically, the
role of research was to create data where there was none, but we no longer live
in a world where data are rare. We have more data than we know what to do with.
And the job of the researcher increasingly will be to make those data usable.
It’s going to take an infusion of new skill sets.

Stories help us navigate life’s complex social problems’just as flight
simulators prepare pilots for difficult situations. Storytelling has
evolved, like other behaviors, to ensure our survival. Stories can also change
the world for the better. Most successful stories are moral’they teach us how
to live, whether explicitly or implicitly, and bind us together around common
values. We know we are master shapers of story.

Several attendees, speakers and sponsors at TMRE 2014 shared
with us some best practices on how to tell a research story.

Watch the full video below:


Insights without impact are worthless. TMRE is the most
trusted, supported insights event in the world and delivers more proven value
than any other of its kind. Beyond “how to,” TMRE is always focused
on the business value of insights – the meat that really matters.

TMRE has grown to be the most comprehensive insights conference in the world.
Focused on the business value of insights, we unite leaders across market
research, consumer insights, strategy, innovation, marketing, analytics,
shopper insights, media research, UX, customer experience, business
intelligence, competitive intelligence and more. Learn more about the event
here: http://bit.ly/1N0CRX1 

The TMRE 2015 Brochure is Now Available for Download

The Market Research Event 2015 brochure is here! TMRE is your industry’s #1
Insights Event, giving you access to the most insights professionals all in one
place at one time.
Translating insights into bottom line impact and
demonstrating the new business value of research is the holy grail. Level up
your skillset and ensure insights remain indispensable to your business.
Seismic shifts are banging at your door. Drive your future and shape the
industry’s future at TMRE.
Download the brochure
for full program details: http://bit.ly/1SHxDRB
This year TMRE has:

??        
65% client side attendees
??        
1300+ leading insights/research professionals
??        
150+ research and insights speakers
??        
100+ cutting edge solutions providers
Level up your skillset and ensure insights remain indispensable
to your business. See how for yourself.
Cheers,
The TMRE 2015 Team
@TMRE
#TMRE15

Themarketresearcheventblog.iirusa.com

Call for Presenters Now Open: The Market Research Event #TMRE15

CALL FOR PRESENTERS: The Market Research Event
Submit your proposal by email to kschram@iirusa.com by Friday January 30, 2015
________________________________________

From: Kelly Schram
Re: The Market Research Event
Date: November 2-4, 2015
Location: Orlando, FL
________________________________________

INDUSTRY ALERT: OFFICIAL CALL FOR PRESENTERS

The Institute for International Research (IIR) is currently seeking presenters for:

November 2-4, 2015 | Orlando, FL

Submissions due by Friday, January 30th. 

NOTE: Presenters are accepted on a rolling basis so early submissions are encouraged.

TMRE is the “World’s Top MR Event” focused on elevating the business impact of insights, designed to empower the researcher to move from insights partner to strategic, consultative leader.

ONLY client-side submissions will be reviewed.  If your company is categorized as a vendor, solutions provider or consultancy, please see below to find out how you can get involved in TMRE. Speakers receive a free pass to attend the event.

We are looking for (in order of priority):

  • Exploration Leaders: Speakers who are willing to literally get “outside the conference walls” and take smaller groups of attendees to local areas to explore/discuss MR/ethnography in action.
  • Interactive Discussions: Excellent facilitators who can give a short presentation and then lead the group in interactive roundtable discussions- with actionable outcomes. 
  • Case Studies: We will only consider NEW case studies that haven’t already been shared at another event or past TMRE event. Suggested topic areas for case studies include:
    • Social Insights: Data Collection, Listening & Analysis
    • Shopper Insights & Analytics
    • Consumer & Market Trends
    • Biometrics & Neuroscience
    • Cross Platform & Digital Insights
    • Marketing & Brand Insights
    • Insight Driven Innovation & Product Development
    • Business to Business Research
    • Data Analytics & Advanced Analytics
    • Innovation in Tools, Techniques & Methodologies
    • Global Insights
    • ROI & Measurement
    • Activating Insights
    • Big Data 
    • Mobile & Technology 
    • Storytelling & Data Visualization
    • What’s Next & The Future 
  • State of the Industry Sessions: Executives who have something new or noteworthy (whitepaper, research report) ready to be released at the time of the event.
  • Debate Sessions: There are always two ways to tackle an insights project. We are looking for two insights executives from the same company- who challenged each other to work differently to find a new solution to a common challenge.

…. AND You Decide: We are VERY happy to consider any type of new format you feel would add value for attendees beyond the traditional case study. So please send us your most exciting ideas, we’d love to hear them!

Submission Guidelines 

Client-side speakers that wish to be considered for the TMRE speaker faculty should send the following information via email to Kelly Schram, Conference Director at kschram@iirusa.com no later than Friday, January 30, 2015. Due to the high volume of responses, only those selected for the program will be notified.

1. Benefit-oriented title of session
2. Summary of session (no more than 100 words)
3. Full contact details for speaker including name, title, company, email, phone and mail
4. Speaker bio

If your submission is selected, portions of your summary will be used to promote your participation in print and online. In an effort to ensure the utmost quality, all final presentations will be subject to review by our content review board prior to the event.


Join The Best In Insights From Around The World: NOVEMBER 2-4, 2015 at Rosen Shingle Creek in Orlando, Florida

   

Special notices to vendors, solutions provider or consultancies:
This call is limited to client-side presenters. If you are a vendor, consultant, solution provider, or technology provider and would like to speak at TMRE, please contact Jon Saxe at jsaxe@iirusa.com or 646-895-7467 or Liz Hinkis at ehinkis@Iirusa.com or 646-616-7627.

Buzz from The Market Research Event 2014: #TMRE14

We had a great event last in Boca Raton as the best and brightest in Market Research joined together to tackle the changes and disruption in the industry at TMRE: The Market Research Event. By late Wednesday afternoon 400+ people had tweeted 3,000+ times using the hashtag #TMRE14 & which resulted in a  reach of 789,000 impressions for the TMRE event. On average, we were getting between 50-70 posts/hr, and in addition, our audience generated 470 photos, 14 videos, and 30 blog posts. It was an amazing and we are truly honored to have shared another amazing event with all of you.

Here is a list of what attendees have shared in the past week or so:

Archives:
seen.co/event/tmre-2014
eventifier.com/event/tmre14
tagboard.com/TMRE14

Recaps & News:

4 Main Takeaways From The Market Research Event via CMO

TMRE 2014: Day 1 Recap, Day 2 via Sentient Decision Science
Keen Strategy on TMRE Takeaways
And if you’re feeling a bit blue because it’s over, here’s a bit of fun to give you a quick lift until next time.
Market Research Love Song by Jibunu:
Storytelling at it’s best:
Flashmob anyone, Oye Como Va:

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

 
Valerie RussoFormerly a senior copy editor at Thomson Reuters, a research editor at AOL,  and a senior web publicist at Hachette Book GroupValerie M. Russo is editor at large of The Front End of Innovation BlogThe Market Research Event BlogThe World Future Trends Tumblr, the Digital Impact Blog, and also blogs at Literanista.net. She is the innovation lead and senior social media strategist for the Marketing and Business Strategy Division of the Institute for International Research, an Informa LLC., and her poetry was published in Regrets Only on sale at the MOMA Gift Shop. Her background is in Anthropology and English Literature. You can reach her at vrusso@iirusa.com or @Literanista.

Live from #TMRE14: Wired for Story

Jonathan Gottschall is a scholar and today at TMRE 2014, he took us through research from his latest book, The Storytelling Animal: How Stories Make Us Human.

Dreams are night stories, stories are the fabric of our social setting. Gossip is the preferred genre of human stories. We have restless minds.

Story Solutions to Key Solutions:

How do you seize and hold attention?
How do you use it to persuade & influence other people?

Average duration of daydreams is 14 seconds, we have about 2,000 per day.

The neuroscience of the brain on story, less still, less passive, the brain experiences empathetic sensation right along with the story. Much like a reaction to a horror movie, your brain processes stories as real.

“Art is an infection” – Tolstoy

Story shapes us, it’s not mindless, it has the ability to change the person consuming the story. Story changes behavior by changing brain chemistry.

None of this works unless the story is good. The story has to acchive narrative transformation. Your audience has to lose itself.

Story’s Universal Grammar:

Character +
Predicament +
Attempted Solution +

Story’s Function:

A story is a problem solution narrative that carries a deeper message, otherwise it’s just a hollow, meaningless vehicle. It expresses values, beliefs, and a bigger meaning.

We love stories, unlike other messaging, we crave good stories the same way we crave good food.

A well told story cuts through the buzz of distraction, settles our restless minds, and holds us rapt.

No other communication form can do this.

Story is emotional. They can blow your mind and change your mind. Stories are more persuasive than strategies based on argument and evidence.

Story is sticky, if you want an idea to enter into the universe and lodge there it’s best to weave it into a story.

Story is infectious, they demand to be retold. As a result the ideas and values in the stories spread virally through social networks.

We need stories in the best and worst of times. We are storytelling animals, stories offer hope and solace.

 ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Valerie RussoFormerly a senior copy editor at Thomson Reuters, a research editor at AOL,  and a senior web publicist at Hachette Book GroupValerie M. Russo is editor at large of The Front End of Innovation BlogThe Market Research Event BlogThe World Future Trends Tumblr, the Digital Impact Blog, and also blogs at Literanista.net. She is the innovation lead and senior social media strategist for the Marketing and Business Strategy Division of the Institute for International Research, an Informa LLC., and her poetry was published in Regrets Only on sale at the MOMA Gift Shop. Her background is in Anthropology and English Literature. You can reach her at vrusso@iirusa.com or @Literanista.

Live from #TMRE14:10 Lessons Market Researchers Can Learn From Journalists

Tom Bernthal, CEO and Co-Founder of Kelton, shared 5 lessons that Market Researchers can learn from journalists at TMRE. Afterall, the truth is in the story,

Journalists are seeking human truth – stories that tell of human experience and create empathy.

Lesson 1:


Let the hypotheses guide you.

Research
Modify
Observation
Reject or Modify
Confirm
Story

Lesson 2:


Story Making vs. Story Telling

The current conversation about storytelling puts too much emphasis on the “telling.” The story that is based on the facts is the one that is passed along.

Frame
Find
Craft
Tell
Act

Lesson 3:


Put humans at the center.

Yang: Story – experience, empathy
Yin: Report – data

Lesson 4:


The Inverted Pyramid


Journalists have an even less captive audience.

Start with the lead
Then the body
then the tail

Don’t bury the lead

Lesson 5


Today’s insights inform tomorrow’s

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

 

Valerie RussoFormerly a senior copy editor at Thomson Reuters, a research editor at AOL,  and a senior web publicist at Hachette Book GroupValerie M. Russo is editor at large of The Front End of Innovation BlogThe Market Research Event BlogThe World Future Trends Tumblr, the Digital Impact Blog, and also blogs at Literanista.net. She is the innovation lead and senior social media strategist for the Marketing and Business Strategy Division of the Institute for International Research, an Informa LLC., and her poetry was published in Regrets Only on sale at the MOMA Gift Shop. Her background is in Anthropology and English Literature. You can reach her at vrusso@iirusa.com or @Literanista.

Live from #TMRE14: Storytelling & Actionable Research Delivery

Today in the Strategic Communications &Consultative Leadership at the Market Research Event, Thania Farrar, Director of Research Innovation, Burke, Inc., offered a framework for sharing actionable research in a way that persuades and influences your audience in a narrative way.

How would you explain what you do and what you found to your mom or someone who is not in our industry?

One of the best ways to decide what information is crucial to include is to talk to your client, vendor, audience to find out what is important to them.

Simple Framework:

What – insight
So what – implication
Now what – action

How to spot an insights:

New – did we know this already
Opportunity – does it offer opportunity
Revenue – is it possible to turn this insight into revenue
Action – can you communicate it effectively?

“Information plus emotion and visualization wrapped in unforgettable anecdotes are the stuff that stories are made of.” – Garr Reynolds, Presentation Zen: Simple Ideas on Presentation Design and Delivery

How will you make your message memorable?

Make it simple, focus on what is important
Keep it concrete
Say it in layman’s terms
Make it credible, less data more context
Use emotion/images to make it more memorable
Connect the information
Take them on a journey

S.C.O.R.E: Give them the score

Situation
Complication
Resolution
Example

Make your tools work to help you tell your story.

Go online to get inspired: slideshare, infographics, prezi, Camtasia Studio, use video

How will you present your research? Let’s us know what inspires you?

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

 
Valerie RussoFormerly a senior copy editor at Thomson Reuters, a research editor at AOL,  and a senior web publicist at Hachette Book GroupValerie M. Russo is editor at large of The Front End of Innovation BlogThe Market Research Event BlogThe World Future Trends Tumblr, the Digital Impact Blog, and also blogs at Literanista.net. She is the innovation lead and senior social media strategist for the Marketing and Business Strategy Division of the Institute for International Research, an Informa LLC., and her poetry was published in Regrets Only on sale at the MOMA Gift Shop. Her background is in Anthropology and English Literature. You can reach her at vrusso@iirusa.com or @Literanista.