Tag Archives: @SouthernGrowth

Innovation Inside the Box: A Systematic Approach to Link Innovation and Marketing Strategy

Innovation
Inside the Box: A Systematic Approach to Link Innovation and Marketing Strategy
By Drew Boyd, Executive Director of the Master of
Science in Marketing, University of Cincinnati 

Back
End of Innovation Conference Keynote: 2016

The thesis of this talk is that Creativity is a skill, not a
gift. This practical advice starts with a promise from Boyd: ‘I’m going to
teach you how to use your brain to innovate anyway you want.’
He then discussed the origin story of the ‘think
outside of the box’ mythology. When you send people outside of the box, the
mind suffers anxiety. The mind works better inside the box, he says, with
constraints.
He then quoted Beatle Paul about ‘templates’ for
songwriting. All artist use patterns, he claims. But the artists don’t want you
to see the patterns. Patterns boost the creative output. ‘Innovators and
inventors use patterns, too, and they are embedded in the products and services
you see everyday.’
The method is Systematic Inventive Thinking’and
there are only five patterns. ‘Innovation follow as set of patterns:
Subtractions, task unification, multiplication, division, attribute
dependency.’ 

Using these patterns you can move from solution
to problem, rather than problem to solution.
To use this method, start with an existing
situation, and then apply one of the five patterns from above. This thinking
tool will yield a virtual product, then vets if it is desired and feasible. At
this stage, an idea is born.
Let’s we examine the Subtraction technique. Here’s
the method: remove a component, then visualize the new prototype, identify user
needs, and then adapt as needed based on the factors of ‘the closed world.’
Taking each piece out and thinking about the possibilities opens up new paths
of innovation.
This method forces you to create combinations
that you wouldn’t create on your own.
Task Unification is the next method we explored.
Here you assign an additional task to a component and walk through the
remaining steps of can we and should we do it.
We used ‘How we can keep consumers in grocery
stores longer’? as an exercise. We listed all components, chose one, and then
create ideas quickly, with time constraints.
The exercise demonstrated the effectiveness of
the technique. Many new ideas were generated. The constraints forced new
thinking, new potential value.
Boyd then gave many examples of the five
techniques. The book explaining these methods is called Inside the Box.
Many of the innovators were excited about this
technique, which works backwards from the empathy-first methods so popular
today. Boyd claims that these methods improve the efficacy of brainstorming
exponentially.
Michael Graber is the
managing partner of the Southern Growth Studio, an innovation and strategic
growth firm based in Memphis, TN and the author of Going Electric, and also serves as VP Innovation at Hunter Fan. Visit
www.southerngrowthstudio.com to learn more.

Brand Measurement: Best Practices to Link Results to In-Market Performance

Brand Measurement:
Best Practices to Link Results to In-Market Performance
Jim Lane, President & CEO, Directions Research
Jim Nyce, Former VP Insights, Sun Products |Kraft| Pepsi
This talk centers on how can insights-people can track data
that leads to real market performance.
The old system is broken. The case example that begins the
session was a major CPG brand that was tracked over four hours. The goal was to
track how pricing impacted market share. Market share lost five points of
share. Once they lowered their price again, share rose, but never to its former
glory. The value for the money was stagnant.
What actions got taken based on the tracker?
The moral of the story is that brand tracking needs
innovation.
Let’s take a quick look back at tracking history:
Brand Health
Assessment’A Very Brief History
1.    
Pre 1985: WE had annual attitude & usage
studies
2.    
Late ’80s: Continuous Tracking comes to America
3.    
’90s-’00′s: Brand Health Tracking Ubiquity
4.    
’00′s: Ongoing Brand Health Tracking
The problem was that Brand Health Tracking was insensitive
to marketplace changes, vulnerable to trend disruptions, and rarely actionable.
As well they are expensive, resource intensive, difficult to dovetail with
other data streams. Most damaging, they were not reflective to the market.
Questions: Does your tracker align with market sales? Is
your tracker sensitive to in-market changes?
Make sure trackers are valid, sensitive, cohesive, and
timely.
You must think beyond traditional scales to capture reality.
You must win. You have to be the best. You must be first to
win.
Ranking is better than ratings for more realistic data
modeling. Rankings more accurately reflects the category. Rankings overly
normalize the data without taking in contextual and cultural  factors. Warning: once a new brand is
introduced into the herd, the measured changes.
Trackers can use social data as an early warning system.
The main point is that brand tracking is lagging, but the
promise of social, mobile, online, phone, and surveys working together makes
tracking more dynamic and actionable.

Michael Graber is the
managing partner of the Southern Growth Studio, an innovation and strategic
growth firm based in Memphis, TN. Visit
www.southerngrowthstudio.com to learn more.

Thrive in the Expectation Economy: The Most Exciting and Urgent Trends of 2016 and Beyond

TMRE Keynote Presentation
Thrive in the
Expectation Economy: The Most Exciting and Urgent Trends of 2016 and Beyond
 Maxwell Luthy, Director of Trends and Insight, TRENDWATCHING

Why track consumer
trends?
To have a future vision and create products or services two
to five years from now.
The first component of every trend is change: social change,
technological change, environmental change, and economic change.  Yet, basic human needs do not change,
including relationships, community, and survival.
The second component of every trends is innovation. The
first example was Uber’and how quickly consumers change their habits to adapt
to the app and service.
The third component is emerging expectations. Expectations
transfer. One-touch service for amazon, created one touch for Uber, and even go
to tender. This is an economy of expectations. It impacts all of your
customers.
The good news is tracking Trends helps you surpass the
Expectation Economy.
1st key
thought:
See technology through a lens of basic human needs and wants, not
from the tech buzz.
2nd key
thought
: Explore the sharing economy. Cars. Umbrella.
3rd key thought:
Who do people feel where they are? People are impatient. What are all the
consumer touch points? You can study the Domino’s Everywhere campaign. So, how
do you get to contextual omnichannel?
Consider the use of emoji to understand customer behavior. Think of new
channels’for example, Spotify’s partnership with Uber. Challenge yourself to
think about new context and channels.
4th key
thought
: A compelling brand is still about feelings. Have you explored
two-way transparency between brands and people? Uber rates passengers. In 2016
expect to see more brands rating customers.
Can you use two-way rating and transparency for all
involved. Brand transparency is more important than ever. You must prove you
have a healthy corporate culture’and show the world an inside out view of your
company. People want to like companies and how they treat their employees.
Ask yourself which aspect of you company culture would you
put up on a billboard?
5th key
thought
: Consumers aren’t behaving as they should. Roles are reversed. More
women over 18 are gamers compared to boys. People break all the demographic
behavioral patterns we used to hold as sacred. Why? We have the global brain.
We’ve been urbanized. Lastly, we have cheap digital experimentation. These three
forces shatter all of our expectations of how people should behave according to
gender, age, and class roles.
We are seeing heritage heresy: Playboy is excluding nude
photos. Harley Davidson is planning 35,000 trees. As cultures shift, brands
must adapt their ethos.
The outcome: treat different people differently. Use
taste-led targeting, like Spotify. Fine tune to individual preference.

Michael Graber is the
managing partner of the Southern Growth Studio, an innovation and strategic
growth firm based in Memphis, TN. Visit
www.southerngrowthstudio.com to learn more.

Capabilities New + Old: Complimentary Practices for Today’s Consumer Reality

Capabilities New +
Old: Complimentary Practices for Today’s Consumer Reality
Sandra Kang, Director, Brand Insights, Digital Insights
& Consumer Affairs, Clorox
Not so long ago, we could take out a TV add, take out a
newspaper add’and win with consumers. Now, it’s all different for the CPG
industry. The, retailers led.
We have moved into the Consumer Led Era. This is the era in
which we compete.
Clorox responds to consumers with a social media team. We
also increasing support our products on many e-tail channels.
We are on a journey to change the way we work. We call it
Sense & Respond marketing.  We have a
cross-functional team that includes a data scientist, an analyst, and insights
person as well as technologists, and others. We are a prototype.
When we came up with the frame work of Sense & Respond,
we saw that we moved from an aggregated, rear-mirror view of consumers, into a
dynamic, predictive, custom view of each consumer.
Change is hard. Innovation can be even harder. The practical
application of this framework means that ‘innovation is hard, you have to be
bold, take risks, and challenge the things we think we know,’ a quote from Carl
Bass, CEO of Autodesk, Inc. 
Lesson one: Back
to basics: Revisit the scope of insights; redefine what it means.
Call-to-action: Redefine what an insight is. Do store
visits. Look at competitors. Play beyond the strategic cloud. Immerse yourself
in what the consumer sees. Next, make allies within the organization. Find
their pain points. Build a rapport.
Lesson two: Research
innovation is not dead. Marketing technology can be a significant enablers of
research innovation.
Call-to-action: Be bold. Be curious. Harness the power of
these new sources of truth, this new world of data.  Turn attitudinal segments on its head. With
big data, they were able to help the Britta brand test four distinct campaigns
to test, then analyze the results. The exercise had the team re-imagine
targeting, segmentation, and attitudinal work.
Lesson three:
Insights, always on.
Call-to-action: Insights is no longer a job for one.
Leverage your business partners. Give them voice. Establish a collaborative
partnership. One-and-done insight creation is a thing of the past. Start with a
hypothesis, and then turn it into a playbook for generating on-going insights. Gather
a team.
Lesson four:
Insight curation, not just creation
.
Call-to-action: Because three key drivers of change, aim for
customer-centricity. Data is profuse and prolific. The explosion of Martech
means that data is accessible to everyone.
Therefore, we are moving to a three-stage model:
1.    
Insight cultivation
2.    
Insight curation
3.    
Decisioning
Here are the lessons learned:
??     
Let’s be messy
??     
Maintain reasonable expectations
??     
Keep an open mind
??     
Data quality is still a top priority
??     
Make friends internally
??     
Get support of senior leaders
This journey is two to three years old. We are both
unlearning and learning new ways. The goal is to make this the default practice
by 2020.
Michael Graber is the
managing partner of the Southern Growth Studio, an innovation and strategic
growth firm based in Memphis, TN. Visit
www.southerngrowthstudio.com to learn more.

2015 TMRE: Seth Godin Question and Answer Session

Seth Godin Question
and Answer Session: TMRE, Orlando 2015
Seth Godin is the author of 18 books. His blog is one of the
most popular in the world.

After a keynote about the Connection Economy, Godin made
time for a Q and A for 50 people.

Q: Companies are risk averse and market researchers are even
more risk averse. What is your advice?
A: Reframe the questions. See how people respond. Companies
aren’t conservative; they are afraid. They all want someone to stand up and
shed light. They mistake their purpose as making the stock rise, instead of
making something meaningful. Take actions on small things, build courage, take
responsibility, give credit. Things will change.
Q: What your view of where marketing will be in five years?
A: This is the next big thing’market to the edges, the
freaks, forget mass’market to individuals. The meta trend is the smartphone.
Most teenagers would rather give up their car than their cell phone’amazing.
Q: Can you talk about scarcity verses Abundance?
A: The source of the scarcity mindset is two fold: 1.
Evolution (not enough food for 1 million years and 2. Limited shelf space. Zero
sum game ‘ the shift is that attention is the scare-est resource. How do you
get more attention? Ideas are abundant. You need to build trust.
Q: What is your view on Twitter?
A: The two stupid things Twitter can do is go public and
sell ads’I wrote this in a post before Twitter went public. Instead, they
should offer a tiered platform with power users who don’t see ads. Twitter will
be less fun to use.
Q: You mentioned about The Weird. Please explain.
A: People move away from the center when given a choice.
Look at people’s browser histories. This was inconceivable 50 years ago when we
had three TV channels to choose from. Now, it is fragmented beyond conception.
Q: When you look at market research, you think about the
push tactics you don’t want. So, what can market research do?
A: Start with reframing the questions, make sense of trends,
not history, but pattern matching. You are charged with taste, not data.
Q. Discuss the art and humanity a little more.
A: Understand patterns. As soon as someone creates an
algorithm, humanity changes, outmodes it. 
It’s the quality of the experience of living, of life, of work.
Q. Thank you for using words like generosity or art in the
realm of marketing. Can you help bring value?
A. I would say you wouldn’t say it yet. But I see it at many
companies. Look at Spotify’the CEO knows that if he hires humans at their edge,
it will bring the company more value. When I say generosity, it doesn’t mean
give it away, it means recognize the humanity of the market.
Q: How do you take it personally when you’re told not to
take it personally.
A: They don’t have to like it, but I made it and I have
proud of it. You can say ‘I made it.’
Q: Turning strangers into friends’can you explain?
A: My book Permission Marketing is about this topic.
Marketing you want to get works better than spam. Would the consumer miss you
if you were gone? Do you have permission. The challenge is how you build a brand
where people want to here from you. It requires humility. Find products for
customers, instead of customers for products. Earn that asset first, and the
other stuff falls into place.
Michael Graber is the
managing partner of the Southern Growth Studio, an innovation and strategic
growth firm based in Memphis, TN. Visit
www.southerngrowthstudio.com to learn more.

Accelerate Growth Through the Strategic Integration of Research During the Innovation Process

Accelerate Growth
Through the Strategic Integration of Research During the Innovation Process
Stephanie Cunningham, Associate Director, Global Insights
Business Lead’Specialty Division, The Clorox Company
Jody McInerney, Senior Vice President, Burke, Inc.
Stephanie began with crisis, a story about the kitty litter
business. Competitive pressures were high. Market share was being lost. They
needed a new product, in a hurry. From concept to packaging, they needed it all:
RTB, packaging design, product name, name and product fit with top benefits,
and fully baked complete concepts to test against legacy products and
competitive products.
Clorox had five weeks to cram in eight months of work before
the end of the fiscal year and their plan to retailers.
They had limited time and were forced to explore
non-traditional methods.
They called Burke, Inc. for help, and began the Accelerated
Learning Labs??, a methodology designed to shorten the learning curse and allow
teams to get more done in less time.
Accelerated Learning Labs?? focus efforts into a single-day
or real-time learning.
Steps of framing an Accelerated Learning Lab??
1.    
Gather Participants
2.    
Evaluate
3.    
Choose subgroup
4.    
Explore
5.    
Refine Ideas as a Team
This methodology provided a way for the Fresh Start team to
get the results they needed in their timeframe.
The Fresh Step team pushed back at first at this method.
There was fear of the unknown, no proof that it would work, and questions about
the output. This process requires a high-performing team to execute, so it was
critical to get all of the internal stakeholders to suspend disbelief and
deeply participate in the process.
For each of these client fears, there was a solution. There
was the trust of working with a supplier with whom they’ve had a decade-long
relationship. They set expectations about the level of involvement. They also
engaged creative teams and agency partners from the outset.
In the end, the whole Fresh Step group (Innovation manager,
brand manager, designers, consultant team, and marketing manager) all dove in
as a unified cross-functional team.
Once aligned, the team moved forward with
??     
Three-in-person sessions in one market
??     
Total of 102 participants (34 per session)
??     
1.5 hours of quantitative evaluations
??     
1.5 hours of qualitative probing with small
groups of six-eight.
Understanding the most compelling message’the RTB’was the
prime mover in this scenario. The, we moved into package design that needed to
stand out at shelf. We tested a total of 18 names. Then, took the names and
packaging and tested fit with the benefit (RTB).
Consumers provided ways to improve the benefit, the
look-and-feel, the imagery, and the name. They were invaluable in driving
iteration after iteration that made the product more desirable in the market.
They planned the five-week sprint in weekly segments with
things that had to be completed each week.
So, was it a success? Yes. They met the impossible timeline.
Since launch, Clorox has done more rigorous testing and the product that was
launched has tested very well each time. Plus, the market accepted and embraced
the product.
The ability to learn in the moment, given the tight
timelines, was instrumental to hitting the condensed timeline.
Michael Graber is the
managing partner of the Southern Growth Studio, an innovation and strategic
growth firm based in Memphis, TN. Visit
www.southerngrowthstudio.com to learn more.

Contagious: How to Make Products, Ideas, and Behaviors Catch On

11/02/15
TMRE Keynote Presentation
Contagious: How to Make Products, Ideas, and Behaviors Catch On
By Jonah Berger, Professor of Marketing, The Wharton School
at the University of Pennsylvania
Berger starts the keynote session by playing a game, Which
is Tastier
? Where two images are shown: broccoli and a cheeseburger.
The vote is cast: the majority vote, you guessed it, for the
cheeseburger. The point is simple. We all know we should eat more broccoli but
the cheeseburger beckons us.
The analogy of tasty then gets turned to ideas. Which ideas
are Tastier?
Some of the ideas are like broccoli’they are good for us,
but not desired, not catching on.
The curse of knowledge plagues the researcher.  We have to overcome what we know and
communicate in a way people will try and spread it. 
As an overview, we will explore these three, key points:
1.    
How we make ideas tastier
2.    
How we craft our insights that make people more
likely to listen
3.    
How we can use word-of-mouth to spread the idea
He asks the audience: What is the science of why people
share? Let’s tour the main points. Let’s learn about the science of social
transmission through storytelling.
Berger showed a slide proving that word-of-mouth is at least
twice as effective as advertising, according to a McKinsey study.
The first hack he shared was based on his experience in
academia. Two copies of the same book were sent to him; the second had a note
encouraging him to pass along to a colleague who may enjoy it. Berger’s point:
find the influencers and give them something to spread, and it comes across as
a recommendation.
So, why do people
share
? Here are the top driving six factors:
1.    
Social currency
2.    
Triggers
3.    
Emotion
4.    
Public
5.    
Practical Value
6.    
Stories
One way to get others to share our ideas is to make them
look good, look smarter’this is the basis of social currency.
We share things that send desired signals of who we are, our
ideal self. So do brands. How can you make your brand tribe feel smart and
in-the-know, on the inside track? If people feel special sharing our stuff,
they will.
One facet of social currency is finding the Inner
Remarkability’something surprising, novel, or interesting. Berger used the
Blendtec blending an iPhone example as the Will it Blend campaign. Blenders
sales went up 700% as a result.
The more you can show rather than tell, the more powerful.
So, what is a Trigger: something that is top-of-mind
because it is tip-of-tongue.
Consideration is 80% of purchase, and getting in the
consideration sphere is the most important part of the strategy.
Here are the four questions for getting value from triggers:
1.    
Who do we want to triggers?
2.    
When do they want to be triggered?
3.    
What is in the environment at that time?
4.    
How can we connect to the environment?
The last tactic discussed is Stories. Facts and data bore
everyone. Stories are vessels of information, a Trojan Horse, a carrier of
information. Stories imbue the emotional shorthand of a brand. Stories are the currency
of conversation.
Berger’s advice: first, find your kernel. What do you want
to pass on, to share? Then, how can you make others feel special about it,
in-the-know, and share.
Michael Graber is the
managing partner of the Southern Growth Studio, an innovation and strategic
growth firm based in Memphis, TN. Visit
www.southerngrowthstudio.com to learn more.

New Frontier of Consumer Research

TMRE 2015 Session
New Frontier of
Consumer Research
Olga Diamandis, Senior Manger, Open Innovation, Mattell
Three key things are happening that are changing research:
Crowdsourcing, big data, and artificial intelligence.  We will mine these dimensions, but first
let’s take a brief look at the history of marketing research.
The field was born in the 1930s with the Likert Scale. This scale becomes
the primary tool to measure consumer attitude. Then, the internet drastically
changed things in the 1990s. Once web sites became dynamic and data was easy to
handle crowdsourcing.
Crowdsourcing
enabled researchers to crowdsource around the globe. Everything from toys, car
design, to a country’s constitution have been crowdsourced.
For Mattell crowdsourcing became a tool for creating new
characters in their Little People line, reducing the time spent in Market
Research.
Big Data creates
new opportunities. From behavioral data to predictive analytics, Big Data
shortens the time to generate insights. Every human leaves a digital trail that
can be cross-analyzed. In the Connected Era the amount of data will spike even
higher.
What Big Data means for advertising is hyper targeting,
creating meaning and relevance for consumers.
Artificial
Intelligence
allows us to track everything without consumer reported data,
decreasing consumer biases. AI, in this realm, includes peer reviews (such as
reviews on Amazon.com) and consumer ratings.
AI also helps us understand ourselves better. What movies we
like. We words we use most often. In time, Siri will take a more proactive
role, recommending places to eat and things to do based on our user patterns.
I know I can go online and find an answer to a question
simply now. Then, I’m thinking that machines can handle the search and the
critical thinking. Revolutionary. I get excited and overwhelmed, but so
excited. The future is limitless, but we have to be adaptive to take advantage
of this emerging mode of the market.
Michael Graber is the
managing partner of the Southern Growth Studio, an innovation and strategic
growth firm based in Memphis, TN. Visit
www.southerngrowthstudio.com to learn more.

Consumers Driving Healthcare Innovations

Everyone in the U.S complains about
healthcare’the rising costs of insurance premiums and co-pays, the lack of
innovation, the poor experience at doctor’s offices and hospitals, and price of
medications. 
The landscape of big healthcare is eroding
faster than the biggest players can adapt.
Thanks to malpractice, the internet, the
rise of specialists and decline of general practitioners, integration with
complementary and alternative medicine, and other factors’consumers feel as if
they must drive their own healthcare. 
Gone are the days when actions are blindly
followed, as in ‘the doctor told me to take this __________________ and do
__________________.’  Instead, internet research leads to
second-guessing and attempts at self-diagnoses. Both scenarios lead
to information anxiety. Too little and too much unfiltered information causes
this quiet despair. The emerging paradigm finds consumers lost,
bewildered, looking for sources and solutions that help make health care make
sense for them’and willing to switch to what works for them. 
This tension creates a gap of opportunity
for disruptive entrants into the market. With 2.8 trillion at play,
everyone will race to get their piece of the pie, from well-established
companies outside of healthcare, to service providers offering new models
of care, to start ups. Hopefully, healthcare companies will recognize
the need to transform their business model and their product and service mix, or
risk dying on the vine. 
A recently released study by
the Health Research Institute (HRI) called ‘Healthcare’s New
Entrants: Who will be the industry’s Amazon.com’ The threat to the
established players is made plain: ‘Revenue
will circulate differently, and to many new
players. Consumers, spending more of their own money, are exerting greater
influence and going beyond the traditional industry to find what they
want and need. In the New Health Economy, purchasers increasingly will reward
organizations providing the best value, whether it’s an academic medical
center, a tech company with a great app, or a healthcare shopping network.’ 
Traditional providers have not yet caught the
tide of change, nor have they figured out how to diversify their revenue steams.
A single innovation can put a huge dent in the market. For example, if half of
all U.S. patients opted to administer an
at-home strep test, it could hurt the traditional provider network as much
as $68 billion. This move would benefit consumers, the company that makes
the test, and the retailer, but is a seismic shift for doctor office
revenues. 
Huge players are scrambling to make
an impact: Walgreen’s, Google, Time Warner, Target, as well as an increasing
number of healthcare technology start ups. 
Who will win? The ones who listen to
consumers, as they are the driving force of the change. 
Michael Graber is the
managing partner of the Southern Growth Studio, an innovation and strategic
growth firm based in Memphis, TN. Visit www.southerngrowthstudio.com to
learn more.