Tag Archives: social networking news

Amazon connects with Facebook – not with Beacon

PCMagazine.com reports that Amazon has rolled out a new application to help customers with purchase decisions based on their use of Facebook. According to the report, the match-up will also give Amazon shoppers a heads-up about a friend’s upcoming birthday, in case they want to use Amazon to buy them a gift. For those who remember Facebook’s ill-advised Beacon program, which shared your purchase activity on third-party sites in your Facebook news feed and was dumped in September 2009, rest assured that this link-up will not share your Amazon purchase history on Facebook. You can purchase a “Twilight” book or a Justin Bieber album without fear of mockery from your Facebook friends.

Will you connect with the new feature? How do you feel about about “social shopping” – would you be willing to try, or try it again?

Conquer Any Networking Event

If you’re a novice at networking or could use a little refresher, Stepcase Lifehack has posted “5 Ways to Conquer Any Networking Event.” We encourage you to check out the list and utilize it at your next networking event.

1. Establish Event-Specific Goals

Walking into a networking event or conference without a plan is, barring a miracle, a waste of your time. Without a plan you’ll bounce from event to event and float toward the people you already know. But not this time! This time you’re going to establish real goals for what you’ll get from a specific event.

For example, a small business owner might attend a local meetup of social media types hoping to expand her network with some web-savvy marketers. Instead of saying, ‘this meetup will give me the chance to make business contacts’ she’ll have a specific outcome in mind and won’t waste time on the wrong people.

2. Identify & Research Targets
3. Use An Event Card
4. Establish Your Presence
5. Follow Up

For more information on Stepcase’s list, please visit the original article.

5 Steps To Conquer Any Networking Event

The Great MySpace Return?

MySpace, the News Corp. owned social network is undergoing a huge redesign of the site. A preview of the social network was release on Monday, according to ChannelWeb. In a briefing for media and analysts in Beverly Hills Monday, the social networking company, outlined a plan that its new co-president says requires “believers” to come to fruition.

USAToday reports that MySpace is moving back to its original DNA: appealing to self-expressive, creative under-35-year-olds who are into games, music and movies. More than half of MySpace’s estimated 100 million users are 25 and younger, according to market researcher ComScore. The 13-to-34-year-old demographic spends 84% of all user time on the service.

So we’re seeing MySpace go back to their roots – do you think that we’ll see a spike in membership?

We’d love to hear your thoughts.

What is the “buzz” on Google’s Buzz? Anyone using it?

There is a lively discussion over Google’s Buzz in our Future Trends LinkedIn group. We’d love to have you join us as we discuss what Buzz means for social networking and community development for the future. Have you used it in conjunction with your other social networking services? What privacy concerns do you have?

Take a few moments and let us know what you think.

Join the discussion.

The Pope and Social Networking

PCWorld.com reports that Pope Benedict XVI is advising members of clergy to be more active in social networking–and His Holiness is practicing what he preaches.

“The increased availability of the new technologies demands greater responsibility on the part of those called to proclaim the Word, but it also requires them to become more focused, efficient and compelling in their efforts,” wrote the Pope in his message for the 44th World Day of Communications, to be held May 16.

The Vatican already has a multilingual Web site, but has recently launched the “Pope2you” portal, offering a Facebook app, iPhone app, YouTube channel, and Papal videos.

So – what can we learn from The Pope’s foray into social media? How will his leadership differ from other leaders because of it?

Learn more: Pope2you: What the Pontiff Knows About Social Networks

Create Infinity: First Look


As a social media professional, we wanted to give you a first look at our new online community — Create Infinity. Join other futurists, trend hunters, free thinkers and idea generators explore all things possible and transition the believers of ‘Infinity’. Where the intersection of personal and professional issues come together ‘ spanning disciplines, generations, industries and mindsets ‘ first in a virtual sense ‘ later in a physical one.

Will the community ask for an innovative look at the future of marketing or will the community seek a community based entirely around the future of social media?

As we continue our growth, we’ll keep you updated!

We’d love to have you join us! Create Infinity

Does Social Networking Breed Social Division?

Riva Richmond of the NYTimes asks, “Is the social media revolution bringing us together? Or is it perpetuating divisions by race and class?”

The graph above is part of a study done by Eszter Hargittai, an associate professor of communication studies at Northwestern University, who surveyed both 2007 and 2009 first-year college students, ages 18 and 19, at the diverse campus of the University of Illinois at Chicago. Hargittai is interested, among other things, in the socioeconomic differences between Facebook and Myspace. In Hargaittai’s research has “found that Hispanics were much less likely to use Facebook than anyone else and much more likely to use MySpace. Whites, African-Americans and Asian-Americans were all big users of Facebook, with 80 percent or more of each group using it sometimes or often.”

So why the difference? Riva Richmond writes, “Students from less educated families were still more likely to use MySpace, while those from more educated families were more likely to use Facebook. So is this white flight? Yes, but it’s not quite so simple, she (Hargittai) says. Everyone is fleeing MySpace, and whites and Asians are fleeing in larger numbers.”

We encourage you to read Riva Richmond’s piece in its entirety here:

Does Social Networking Breed Social Division?


Eszter Hargittai’s blog

Moms Using Social Media Grows

According to Mike Shields of Progressive Grocer, moms–especially new moms–are flocking to social networking sites. In a report by BabyCenter, moms of young children have reduced their time with magazines and newspapers and converted to the online networking sphere. Shields reports that many times moms have two sets of friends, the online group of peers and their friends and family. “Because these women are so social, and so information hungry, they often meet other mothers in similar child-rearing stages on sites like BabyCenter and all sorts of mommy blogs.”

How can social networking sites cater to new moms?

Iranians Utilizing Social Networks to Coordinate Protests


Brad Stone and Noam Cohen of The New York Times report that, as the embattled government of President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad appears to be trying to limit Internet access and communications in Iran, new kinds of social media are challenging those traditional levers of state media control and allowing Iranians to find novel ways around the restrictions.

Iranians are blogging, posting to Facebook and, most visibly, coordinating their protests on Twitter, the messaging service. Their activity has increased, not decreased, since the presidential election on Friday and ensuing attempts by the government to restrict or censor their online communications.

Americans and other western nations with ties or sympathies with Iran are finding a deeper understanding of the turmoil by joining Facebook groups and following Tweets.

Twitter executives have recognized the power of Twitter during these events and even canceled schedule maintenance of the site in order to keep it open for use.
Acknowledging its role on the global stage, the San Francisco-based company said Monday that it was delaying a planned shutdown for maintenance for a day, citing ‘the role Twitter is currently playing as an important communication tool in Iran,” The Times reports. For a deeper understanding of the role that social networking in playing in Iran, please visit the New York Times article here.

Social Networks Spread Iranian Defiance Online

Overuse of Social Networking?

The editors of The New York Times, ask, “Is there such a thing as overuse of social networking tools? In the online world, is the notion of a public/private divide simply not applicable?”

Throughout the post, the editors consulted the following experts in the online social media field:

Clay Shirky, Interactive Telecommunications Program at N.Y.U
Timothy B. Lee, Princeton’s Center for Information Technology Policy
Susan Mernit, former AOL vice president and blogger
David E. Meyer psychology professor, University of Michigan

Clay Shirky, “Society has always carved out space for young people to misbehave. We used to do this by making a distinction between behavior we couldn’t’t see, because it was hidden, and behavior we could see, because it was public. That bargain is now broken, because social life increasingly includes a gray area that is publicly available, but not for public consumption.”

Timothy B. Lee, “Many users find these tools inconvenient or hard to use, and some are careless about posting information that could become embarrassing in the future. But we shouldn’t be too impatient; the offline world has a centuries-long head start in developing privacy-preserving tools and social conventions.”

Susan Merit, “One of the truths of social media that is hard to face is that micro information can be both embarrassing and boring, leading to a terminal case of twittering too hard and to the need to get over yourself. Wondering if you’ve crossed the line? If you have to ask, you probably have.”

David E. Meyer, “Excessive multitasking can lead to chronic stress, with potential damage to the cardiovascular, immune, and nervous systems. Fatal accidents are more likely too. Nobody, not even the inveterate multitasker, is completely invulnerable to these effects. “

After reviewing the comments of these experts, what do you think warrants an overuse of social networking?