Tag Archives: Snapchat

Is Amazon in the Room?

By: Laura Sigman

This post was
originally published on the LightSpeed Research blog.

On a recent
earnings call
, Sir Martin Sorrell, CEO of Lightspeed’s parent company WPP, talked
about what keeps him up at night. And no; it’s not (necessarily) his infant
daughter ‘ it’s Amazon.
‘And I would just mention the rise of Amazon, because in
answer to the question, my favorite question is what worries you when you go to
bed at night and when you wake up in the morning. It’s not a three-month-old
child (laughter), it’s Amazon, which is a child still, but not three months.
And Amazon’s penetration of most areas is frightening, if not terrifying to
some, and I think there is a battle brewing between Google and Amazon.’
The fear mostly seems to be of the unknown, as Amazon is
thought to be quietly
pursuing an advertising strategy
 carefully away from the watchful eyes
of Wall
Street
.
Is Amazon really committed? They are by pure virtue of their
strategically evolving business model. By being among the first big players on
the e-commerce scene, they cemented their early adapter consumers to them.
They’ve grown a multimedia offer around their core competency, and now Amazon
knows not only what we read, but what we search for, what we buy, what we
watch, what we listen to. I’m an Amazon Prime customer, and I take advantage of
all of the bells and whistles that come along with it. So they know what
content I’m engaging with, and whether I’m connecting to the content from my
PC, smartphone, tablet or Alexa. And they can leverage this vast supply of
shopper and behavioral data to sell hyper-targeted advertising to brands who
can then speak directly to me.
When you look at it like that, it’s really not much
different than how we’ve worked in the panel world. Historically, we have facilitated
the conversations brands have with consumers, and have evolved by taking
advantage of emerging technologies to help amplify those conversations. And,
like Amazon, we grew our business by embracing early on that panelists
(consumers) are people, too. 
(Believe it or not, it’s not as obvious to
everyone as that sounds!) Today’s consumers want to have meaningful
interactions, but they also want to have them when and where is convenient to
them. So we meet them on their devices of choice; we always design surveys
mobile-first (in fact, Lightspeed has an
entire team dedicated to this
) and we use
data appends
 to reach the right consumer with the right questions. We
invite survey respondents to answer open-ends with video
responses
 ‘ an engaging experience for them resulting in more
meaningful data for brands to act on. We’re able to blur the line between quant
and qual, intercepting surveys with invites to participate in deeper, on-point
conversations. And brands can leverage all of this to create hyper-targeted
advertising that speaks directly to their consumers. Which ties back to that
Amazon example I shared above.
As Kantar pointed out at their FragmentNation
event
, the marketplace is splintering — not with a whimper but with a
bang. So while the ad world should fear the Amazon in the room, it should also
embrace it. It’s an eye-opening reminder that consumers are advertising’s most
valuable assets in a marketplace that is more diverse and fragmented than ever.

Image Recognition and the Future of Digital Analytics

This post was originally
published
on Kelton Global’s Blog.

The days of text-centric social feeds are officially long
gone. A whopping 1.8 billion images are uploaded to the Internet daily
and of those, 350 million are shared on Facebook. Instagram recently
surpassed 500 million active users, and Snapchat now has more active users than Twitter. The content that flows
into our social feeds is more heavily optimized than ever to deliver more of
what people want’less text and more visuals.
Brands have adapted their social content strategies
accordingly by delivering more visually immersive experiences. And while we’re
seeing significant shifts in branded content, this influx of visual content has
yet to herald a commensurate change in social analytics. Accordingly, few gains
have been made to measure and derive insights from the contents of images or
video. Social listening has historically focused on the challenges of text-based
analysis’specifically, the challenge of determining the context and meaning
behind posts. But as social media habits evolve, it’s clear that deriving
insights from pictures is an increasingly important aspect of understanding
consumers. That’s where image recognition comes into play.
Brands have adapted
their social content strategies accordingly by delivering more visually
immersive experiences.

Simply put, image recognition is the process of translating
images to data. Photos and images can reveal a wealth of data
points’demographics, purchases, personalities, and behaviors (just to name a
few). Through next generation image recognition, a mere selfie may reveal a
person’s gender, approximate age, location disposition, and even the clothing
brands that the person is wearing. As text-centric media takes a backseat to
image and video, the opportunity to understand the contents of these formats
grows. These insights represent a veritable treasure trove of actionable data
for brands.
Tools that analyze image and video-based content are still
in development, but increased investment in research is already impacting
commercial products and how they’re advertised. One example is brand logo
recognition’scanning images for brand logos, and flagging them with the
corresponding brand names. This tool is especially powerful considering that 80% of photos shared online depict a brand logo but don’t
explicitly call out the brand’s name.
 This fact points to a sizable
opportunity for companies to measure and understand the impact of these formerly
inaccessible data points.
Photos and images can
reveal a wealth of data points’demographics, purchases, personalities, and
behaviors (just to name a few).

As an example of how this applies to brands, Kelton’s
Digital Analytics team took a look at the scores of backyard BBQ photos that
flooded public forums, blogs, and social feeds over the recent 4th of July
holiday. We experimented to see which of two quintessentially American beverage
brands’Coca-Cola and Budweiser’netted more published images of
patriotically-themed bottles and cans (as well as other forms of branding) on
social media.

In the end, Coca-Cola branding was twice as prominent as
Budweiser’s. We found that Coke bottles and cans popped up in more diverse
settings such as public parks and inside motor vehicles, whereas Budweiser was
predominantly found in bars and house parties. Coke also aroused greater
sentiment around the theme of Americana, as many consumers
photographed vintage Coca-Cola gear and opted for bottles over cans. This might
explain why Coke captured a significantly greater share of social mentions than
Budweiser.
This example illustrates several ways that brands can
leverage image recognition technology to build actionable insights:
??        
Ethnographic data ‘ Identify where, when
and how often brands are showing up in people’s lives.
??        
Updated brand health analysis ‘ We now have
a more comprehensive point of view of brands’ online footprint.
??        
Sponsorship and Branding ROI ‘ Extend the
value of branding and sponsorships shared via online news, blogs and social
media through a multiplier effect.
??        
Influencer identification ‘ Find authentic
brand advocates who consume and spotlight your merchandise.
??        
Misuse use of brand iconography ‘ Surface
content that depicts improper usage of brand’s logo or other creative assets.

In today’s ever-shifting social media landscape, it’s never
been more important for brands and their partners to stay aware of the new and
emerging capabilities that can help better understand consumers’ behavior
online. Image recognition is just the beginning. From AI startups to instant
objection recognition devices
, the mobilization and fusion of research,
tech, and capital is quickly reshaping the way we think about analytics. These
new tools will add even more contextual understanding to sentiment on social
platforms, empowering brands to understand consumers like never before.

Image Recognition and the Future of Digital Analytics

This post was
originally published on the Kelton
Global Blog
.

The days of text-centric social feeds are officially long
gone. A whopping 1.8 billion images are uploaded to the Internet daily
and of those, 350 million are shared on Facebook. Instagram recently
surpassed 500 million active users, and Snapchat now has more active users than Twitter. The content that flows
into our social feeds is more heavily optimized than ever to deliver more of
what people want’less text and more visuals.
Brands have adapted their social content strategies
accordingly by delivering more visually immersive experiences. And while we’re
seeing significant shifts in branded content, this influx of visual content has
yet to herald a commensurate change in social analytics. Accordingly, few gains
have been made to measure and derive insights from the contents of images or
video. Social listening has historically focused on the challenges of
text-based analysis’specifically, the challenge of determining the context and
meaning behind posts. But as social media habits evolve, it’s clear that deriving
insights from pictures is an increasingly important aspect of understanding
consumers. That’s where image recognition comes into play.
Brands have adapted their social content strategies
accordingly by delivering more visually immersive experiences.
Simply put, image recognition is the process of translating
images to data. Photos and images can reveal a wealth of data
points’demographics, purchases, personalities, and behaviors (just to name a
few). Through next generation image recognition, a mere selfie may reveal a
person’s gender, approximate age, location disposition, and even the clothing
brands that the person is wearing. As text-centric media takes a backseat to
image and video, the opportunity to understand the contents of these formats
grows. These insights represent a veritable treasure trove of actionable data
for brands.
Tools that analyze image and video-based content are still
in development, but increased investment in research is already impacting
commercial products and how they’re advertised. One example is brand logo
recognition’scanning images for brand logos, and flagging them with the
corresponding brand names. This tool is especially powerful considering that 80% of photos shared online depict a brand logo but don’t
explicitly call out the brand’s name.
 This fact points to a sizable
opportunity for companies to measure and understand the impact of these
formerly inaccessible data points.
Photos and images can reveal a wealth of data
points’demographics, purchases, personalities, and behaviors (just to name a
few).
As an example of how this applies to brands, Kelton’s
Digital Analytics team took a look at the scores of backyard BBQ photos that
flooded public forums, blogs, and social feeds over the recent 4th of July
holiday. We experimented to see which of two quintessentially American beverage
brands’Coca-Cola and Budweiser’netted more published images of
patriotically-themed bottles and cans (as well as other forms of branding) on
social media.

In the end, Coca-Cola branding was twice as prominent as
Budweiser’s. We found that Coke bottles and cans popped up in more diverse
settings such as public parks and inside motor vehicles, whereas Budweiser was
predominantly found in bars and house parties. Coke also aroused greater
sentiment around the theme of Americana, as many consumers
photographed vintage Coca-Cola gear and opted for bottles over cans. This might
explain why Coke captured a significantly greater share of social mentions than
Budweiser.
This example illustrates several ways that brands can
leverage image recognition technology to build actionable insights:
??        
Ethnographic data ‘ Identify where, when
and how often brands are showing up in people’s lives.
??        
Updated brand health analysis ‘ We now have
a more comprehensive point of view of brands’ online footprint.
??        
Sponsorship and Branding ROI ‘ Extend the
value of branding and sponsorships shared via online news, blogs and social
media through a multiplier effect.
??        
Influencer identification ‘ Find authentic
brand advocates who consume and spotlight your merchandise.
??        
Misuse use of brand iconography ‘ Surface
content that depicts improper usage of brand’s logo or other creative assets.

In today’s ever-shifting social media landscape, it’s never
been more important for brands and their partners to stay aware of the new and
emerging capabilities that can help better understand consumers’ behavior
online. Image recognition is just the beginning. From AI startups to instant
objection recognition devices
, the mobilization and fusion of research,
tech, and capital is quickly reshaping the way we think about analytics. These
new tools will add even more contextual understanding to sentiment on social
platforms, empowering brands to understand consumers like never before.

How Social Media is Becoming More Focused on Visuals

How many Snapchats have you sent within the last hour? When was the last time you chatted on the phone or saw the recipient in person? Snapchat is quickly becoming the new means for communication as the enticing image based, concise text focused, app allows users to conveniently keep in touch. While traditional advertising via TV, billboard, and radio are ongoing, advertising through a platform where users have chosen to accept ads and want to see them can bring effectiveness to another level. Consumers barely look up from their phones when walking the streets’ or even driving, for that matter. What are they looking at? Snapchat, Instagram, Facebook- apps that require minimal mental engagement yet provide short and fast entertainment while walking down the street.
With about one in three millennials currently using the platform, it only makes sense for brands to step in and capitalize on the situation. Unique and eye-capturing content is the only route to take when trying to engage with consumers via the time constricting app. Snapchat allows marketers to connect with fans in a simple yet memorable way with the advantage of prompting impulse purchases due to the fact that the message will quickly vanish!
 Photo credit: LA Times.Business

From ‘snapping’ coupons to consumers to offering sneak-peaks, this type of marketing is on the rise and will only continue to grow as these real-time, image-based apps emerge. Now lies a great opportunity to step in and start a trend of connecting with consumers before it too becomes commonplace.
Furthermore, Instagram has also become a great source for advertising. There is so much that can be captured in an image and distributed to ‘followers’ that allow this platform to take giant strides in a marketing sense.
In choosing to ‘follow’ a certain brand, the user commits to seeing all image posts that brand populates. In the consumer’s eye, the brand must narrow down their single post to the best, most memorable and action inducing image and/or saying to capture the attention of the user. In doing so, the consumer is no longer bombarded by continuous and exhausting ads as that ended up in ‘un-liking’ a brand’s Facebook page in the past. Instagram creates a visually appealing platform for consumers to glance down at and connect to while on-the go.
Gain a competitive advantage by seeing who your followers follow. What other companies are they following? What are they posting? Any potential partnerships? How will you incorporate these ever-growing trends into your marketing plan?
Janel Parker, Market Research Consultant at SKIM, an international consultancy and marketing research agency, has a background in Marketing and Psychology from Cornell University. Her previous experience at a social media agency combined with her knowledge from SKIM provide for a unique understanding of the relationships between social media and marketing. She can be reached at j.parker@skimgroup.com.

TMRE 2013 Video: 5 Shocking Trends That Will Change the Way You Do Business

Constant change at a rapidly accelerating pace is upon us. How you, as a research company or a client-sider, plan to allocate your time and money in order to keep up with the pace of change is becoming an increasingly tricky equation. Here are a few things you should note about the pace of change.

Wynne Tyree is the Founder and President of Smarty Pants and discusses her findings in this presentation available here (Run time: 00:36:16). The five trends she discusses in this encore session are:

1. Facebook is Dead – Young people are leaving Facebook for other apps such as Snapchat or Instagram. The reason for this being is the invasion of parents onto Facebook and as a result young teens are leaving for more private apps.

It is important to note that these millennials are not deactivating Facebook, they are just using it differently.


2. Zero TV Households – This doesn’t necessarily mean that a household doesn’t own a TV, it just means they do not pay for cable.

In fact, 75% of these households own TVs they just use other means to get TV such as Hulu or Netflix.

3. Bigger is Normal – This trend deals with the obesity problem in America and is a problem because becoming heavier is the new norm in America.

Almost 70% of adults are overweight or obese, and this is setting a bad example for our nations youth. Most of the top brands in the U.S. (28/50) are nutritionally weak and this is not helping the problems.

4. Dads Are Important – The number of stay at home dads has doubled in recent years. Dads have their own unique style of parenting and are available to be targeted.

Also, 50% of dads do grocery shopping for the family and this is another area to target dads.

5. What Does The Fox Say: This YouTube video is funny and random and that is the trend. The fact that there is no point and that anyone can create content is what makes this a trend.

This video and videos like it are open to interpretation and are connecting people because they are funny in a different way for every individual.

About the Author:
Ryan Polachi is a contributing writer concentrating his
focus on Marketing, Finance and Innovation. He can be reached at rpolachi@IIRUSA.com.

Lessons Learned from The Market Research Event, Part 1

Why Researchers Must Invest In Adaptability

By Marc Dresner, IIR

With The Market Research Event 2013 a few weeks behind us and the Thanksgiving holiday approaching here in the States, this seemed a good time to offer some food for thought from this year’s conference.

For those who were unable to attend, TMRE 2013 in Nashville October 21-23 was loaded with more content than anyone could possibly consume in three short days’world-class keynotes, workshops, nine concurrent tracks’

Between my session notes, off-the-record discussions with friends in the industry and my on-camera interviews for TMRE‘s annual series, The Research Insighter (stay tuned!) I’ve had plenty to stew on.

I just can’t escape an obvious theme that you’ve all heard over and over but which nonetheless bears repeating: Change.

I was initially reluctant to address it here, because the topic frequently elicits a roll of the eyes, but hear me out.

I’m not talking about the hyped kind of change.

You’ll find no preachy rant, no breathless call to action, no hyperbolic lament about the industry’s fate here.

It’s just a quiet truth you can take to the bank: Constant change at a rapidly accelerating pace is upon us.

No news there, right? Stay with me.

I guess I’m writing about it because when I add up everything I heard at TMRE this year, there’s a nuance, a contour to ‘change’ that feels somehow different. Not more urgent, but maybe a little more tangible? Like, ‘Huh. This stuff all the futurists and assorted gurus have been talking about for years is actually coming to pass.’

The seed was planted during a private luncheon for research clients I attended at TMRE hosted by youth and family research firm Smarty Pants, whose founder and president, Wynne Tyree, informed us that among teens ‘Facebook is dead.’

I wasn’t shocked by this revelation. My mother’a grandmother of two’is an avid Facebook user. Nuf said.


Twitter, Instagram, Snapchat’that’s where the action is now. But only for now. I’ve a hunch that Snapchat’s CEO may rue the day he turned down Facebook’s $3 billion offer, because made-to-last is contracting fast.

Futurist Jared Weiner of Weiner, Edrich, Brown in his TMRE keynote dubbed the phenomenon ‘templosion”the implosion of really big things into short bursts of time.

‘Big companies used to take a long time to build; today they’re born and they die in record time,’ said Weiner, who punctuated his point with a boneyard of brands.

And not to pick on Facebook, but it exemplifies this trend. Not even 10 years old and already its innovation strategy now appears to be the same as that of any venerable corporation today: acquire. Snapchat isn’t its first foray; Facebook bought Instagram last year.

So what does this have to do with research?

Well, first of all, it’s clear that whether you’re a research provider or a client-sider, you don’t want to get hung up on a platform, because it may not matter tomorrow.

What if, say, your bailiwick is ratings? Now there’s a scary proposition.

Nielsen in October launched Twitter TV ratings, but Twitter is seven years old! That’s like #ancient!!!

And now that Twitter has IPO’d, it’s a safe bet the folks in charge there will soon adopt the same innovation strategy as their peers at Facebook.

Bottom line: I trust we’re all prepared to move quickly when Twitter falls from favor, because the people at Twitter are most likely already planning for that inevitability.

So I would humbly suggest that researchers maintain nimble investment strategies.
In an environment of flux, flexibility and speed are important. And let’s face it, neither attribute comes particularly naturally to research. I still remember all the flak Gordon Black took over his weighting schemes in Harris Interactive’s early days.

How you, as a research company or a client-sider, plan to allocate your time and money in order to keep up with the pace of change is becoming an increasingly tricky equation.

We need to be prepared to make some quick compromises in order not to fall behind.

Please check back tomorrow for part two. We’ll look at Malcolm Gladwell’s inverted U and why it may matter to researchers who want to invest in adaptability.

Thanks for reading!

ABOUT THE AUTHOR 

Marc Dresner is IIR USA’s sr. editor and special communication project lead. He is the former executive editor of Research Business Report, a confidential newsletter for the marketing research and consumer insights industry. He may be reached at mdresner@iirusa.com. Follow him @mdrezz.