Tag Archives: smartphones

Hacking H(app)iness Reveals Quantified (Whole) Self

Consumer Devices and Apps May Unlock Door to Measuring Unconscious Emotions

By
Marc Dresner, IIR
John Havens is on to something
that marketers and consumer researchers should pay close attention to, because
the implications for insights work are huge.
This trend gets to the very essence of consumer intelligence and it may be the wave of the future…only it’s happening now.
John Havens
The research isn’t
being conducted by consumer researchers; this research is being conducted by
consumers, themselves, for themselves.
Havens’author of ‘Hacking H(app)iness:
Why Your Personal Data Counts and How Tracking
it Can Change the World’ and founder of the H(app)athon Project–is on a
mission to help people objectively take
stock of their lives using data they collect about themselves, and to then adjust
their behaviors, lifestyles and priorities according to what those data tell
them.
‘Hacking H(app)iness involves using the devices and
technologies we interact with every day to track, understand and
optimize every aspect of our lives’
‘Hacking H(app)iness involves using the devices and technologies around
us that we interact with every day to track, understand and
optimize every aspect of our lives,’ Havens said.
‘We don’t always know how we are feeling,’ Havens remarked. 
‘The data we can collect about ourselves on our smartphones, using apps and through other devices can serve as a proxy for our emotions and help us to improve our overall ‘wellbeing’ and quality of life,’ he added.
‘We don’t always know how we are feeling’Data
we can collect about ourselves on smartphones using apps can serve as a proxy
for our emotions.’
It’s based on the science of
positive psychology. After all, Havens is about hacking happiness, not misery’a thoroughly noble pursuit to be sure.
But after conducting an
interview with Havens for the Research Insighter podcast series, yours truly
has honestly been preoccupied with the potential applications and implications
for consumer researchers.
So I hope you’ll  forgive me
if I focus less attention than I should on the potential benefit to mankind and
more on the possibility that consumers may figure out a way to harness Big Data
before those of us in marketing do.
Self Improvement…Gamified?

You’re probably familiar
with the ‘Quantified Self’ movement taking the healthcare and wellness
industries by storm.
It’s generally associated
with using sensor technology in smartphones and wearable devices (think Fitbit)
to track and analyze physiological and other health-related data: heart rate,
blood pressure, exercise, etc.
Now, ‘quantified
selfies’ will tell you that monitoring one’s own blood pressure, pulse and the
like barely scratches the surface of the quantified self movement.
And they’re right.
The Quantified Self movement is in many respects the gamification of self improvement.

In many respects, the Quantified Self movement this is the
gamification of self improvement.
Some devotees’there are clubs
of them sprouting up all over (New York has a ‘chapter’)’monitor their
cognitive functioning, blood oxygen levels’even the quality of the very air in
the room they’re breathing.
And they don’t stop there.
Want to know how well you
sleep at night? You need not necessarily spend a night in a medical sleep
center; you can do it yourself at home in your own bed without a bunch of
clinicians watching you thrash around in your sheets from behind glass.
Not all of these data are
passively collected.
What you ate for lunch, for
example, and its nutritional content needs to be manually entered, but that’ll
get easier fast. (Watch for barcodes next to menu items in restaurants that can
be scanned to your smartphone to track your diet.)
Technology that was only accessible to healthcare professionals, the
military, law enforcement, etc., is now becoming commercially available to everyday consumers.
The point is that much of
this, Havens points out, is possible because technology that was until recently
only accessible to healthcare professionals, the military, law enforcement,
etc., is now becoming commercially available to everyday consumers.
For example, he noted there’s
an app available for download that accurately reads your heart rate by just pointing
your smartphone’s camera at your face.
‘These
devices don’t even have to be touching
us to collect this data,’ Havens emphasized.
This type of stuff was
formerly the domain of agents scoping out potential terrorists in airports.
And there are other equally
sophisticated, albeit less sexy data collection technologies that are also
making their way into the hands of everyday folks.
DIY online tracking? The data collection and analytics tools marketers
use are making their way into the hands of average folks.
I’m talking about the data
collection and analytics tools marketers use.
Think do-it-yourself online tracking’the
activity, time spent, sites visited, Google searches, etc.
What could this information
tell us about ourselves?
I recently attended IIR’s
Media Insights and Engagement conference’a sister event to the Future of Consumer Intelligence, which sponsors this blog’and I can tell you media
researchers are quite keen on getting at cross-platform media consumption data
(not just programming content, but social and any other “media,” too’all of it).
Meanwhile, Havens in his
book proposes that you and I’wearing our Joe Consumer hats’might benefit from looking
at how much time we spend playing Candy Crush, streaming YouTube videos,
Facebooking, listening to MP3s, bidding on eBay auctions, etc.
Now where am I going to get
that data?
My smartphone,
my tablet, my desktop computer…Eureka!
So what would I do with this information?
H(app)iness
hacking is like looking at a monthly credit card statement…You can see what you truly value based on where you spent your money.
Havens compares it to
looking at one’s monthly credit card statement (something else I happen to have
access to, coincidentally).
‘With
a credit card statement, you can see what you truly value because there is a list of
what you put your money toward in the past month,’ he told the Research
Insighter.
Similarly,
you know you really like music if you see that you’ve downloaded a ton of it.
Or
maybe it’s a lot of pornography that you’ve been downloading?
That’s
where the positive change comes into play.
‘If
you ask someone what really matters to them in life, they’ll tell you things
like family time,’ said Havens.
‘But
what if you had objective data about how you live your life? If you could track
the things that you claim’that you believe’are important to you’? he asked.
If you could track the things that you believe are important to you, on paper the actual data might suggest otherwise.
‘We
might find that actually, according to the data, we don’t really value those
things’at least that’s how it looks on paper. And we can make a change,’ Havens said.
I’m not going to suggest
that this stuff is going to make online surveys look primitive, like leaching’but
you must admit Havens has a point.
Self-reported behavior isn’t
bullet proof. 
And self-reported feelings? 

So much attention and investment is
being devoted to unlocking the unconscious emotional motivations that drive consumer
behavior in the research community for good reason.

‘My hope is that these tools
will allow people the opportunity to improve their wellbeing by making
decisions based on real data, knowing things about themselves that they might not otherwise be
aware of,’ said Havens.
Now tell me the research
community shouldn’t pay attention to this.


And click these links to check
out John Havens’ book, ‘Hacking H(app)iness,’ and to learn more about the
H(app)athon Project.
Editor’s note: John Havens will deliver a keynote titled, ‘Hacking
Happiness: How to Give Big Data a Direction’ at the Future of Consumer Intelligence conference taking place May
19-21 in San Francisco.

As a reader of this blog you will SAVE 15% on
your registration to attend the Future of Consumer Intelligence when you use
code FOCI14BLOG.  Register here today!


For more information, please visit www.futureofconsumerintel.com


ABOUT THE AUTHOR / INTERVIEWER 
Marc Dresner is IIR USA’s sr. editor and special communication project lead. He is the former executive editor of Research Business Report, a confidential newsletter for the marketing research and consumer insights industry. He may be reached at mdresner@iirusa.com. Follow him @mdrezz.

How to Build Habit-Forming Products in Four Steps

Can New Model Help Get Respondents Hooked on Research?

By Marc Dresner, IIR
Email, Facebook, Twitter’most of
us engage in one or more of these and other, similar types of pursuits every
day, usually many times a day, without fail and typically without being
prompted to do so.
Some of these activities we can justify.
Maybe not Angry Birds, but we all
need email, right? Our jobs demand it.
Even on vacation’with autoreply’when
all projects and accounts are in safe hands and you’ve dotted all the i’s and
crossed all the t’s before walking out the door’
Let’s be honest: Do you tell your
colleagues not to email you while you’re away on vacation or is it usually the
other way around?
My boss once threatened me with
an additional week of vacation if I emailed
her again from whatever beach I was suffering on.
And I’m not even a workaholic.

Sometimes, it’s not a
matter of choice; it’s an inescapable compulsion.

Deprivation studies show that separating someone from their smartphone for just one day produces intense anxiety

Indeed, deprivation studies show time
and again that when separated from one’s favorite device’usually a smartphone’for
even just a single day, people frequently experience intense anxiety.

Nir Eyal refers to the apps and
such to which we as a society seem increasingly tethered as ‘habit-forming
technologies.’

‘These
products somehow draw us to use them’It’s unprompted engagement.’
Nir Eyal

‘These products
somehow draw us to use them,’ said Eyal. ‘It’s unprompted engagement. They
don’t necessarily say, ‘Hey, come open this app,’ and yet we still take out our
phone and do it anyway.’

In
short, a ‘habit’ occurs with some regularity and usually with little or no
conscious thought.
And in his new book, ‘Hooked: How to Build Habit-Forming Products,’ Eyal explores the how and why behind this
behavior and introduces a model for developing products that cultivate it.

The
pattern that habit-forming technologies take time and again is a four-step
process: the ‘Hook Model’

‘The
process, the pattern that we see habit-forming technologies take time and time
again is a four-step process I call the ‘Hook Model,” Eyal told The Research Insighter.

‘The Hook Model is very
simply an approach to connect your user’s problem to your solution with enough
frequency to form a habit,’ he added.

How
could the Hook Model be applied to increase research response and cooperation?

While
this should appeal to anyone in product development for obvious reasons, geek
that I am, I couldn’t help but wonder how the Hook Model might be applied to increase
research response and cooperation.

To what
extent do we see Hook Model principles effectively used in some of our more
engaged panels and research communities?
Can
these principles be introduced with minimal risk of biasing sample?
In this
interview with The Research Insighter‘the official podcast series of the Future of Consumer Intelligence conference’we’ll review:
‘ The four-step
process for getting someone ‘hooked’
‘ The
roles frequency and perceived utility play
‘ How
to increase the habit-forming potential of a product or service, and much more’

Editor’s note: Nir Eyal will present ‘Designing Habit-Forming Technology‘ at The Future of Consumer Intelligence conference taking
place May 19-21 in Universal City, CA.

As a loyal reader of this blog you will SAVE 15% on your registration to attend The Future of Consumer Intelligence when you use code FOCI14BLOG today!

For more information or to
register, please visit www.futureofconsumerintel.com 

Want to hear more from Nir Eyal? Check out his blog: NirAndFar.com.
Marc Dresner

ABOUT THE INTERVIEWER 
Marc Dresner is IIR USA’s sr. editor and special communication project lead. He is the former executive editor of Research Business Report, a confidential newsletter for the marketing research and consumer insights industry. He may be reached at mdresner@iirusa.com. Follow him @mdrezz.

Infographic: 2013 marks the first year U.S. adults spent more time viewing media on digital devices

“2013 marks the first year U.S. adults spent more time viewing media on digital devices ‘ more than any other form. It appears that print, radio and even television have officially become unseated as dominate sources of media.” via visual.ly & kissmetrics.com

Crossing the Digital Divide
by KISSmetrics.
Explore more infographics like this one on the web’s largest information design community – Visually.

Smartphones: A Perfect Way to Reach Stranded Travelers

IHG’s Holiday Inn Express iPhone App

Mobile is a booming channel for travel companies. For my company, Intercontinental Hotels Group (IHG), annual gross mobile booking revenue has risen from $2.5 million in 2009 to over $130 million in 2011. Most importantly, it is letting travel companies reach a new segment of customers: same-day bookers, those that are buying transportation and travel lodging the same day that they are going to use it.

Same day bookings account for nearly 65% of the bookings that are made on the InterContinental Hotels Group mobile apps and mobile websites and other travel companies are reporting similar numbers through their mobile products. In contrast, same-day customers only account for a small percentage of bookings made on desktop websites. A large portion of these same-day customers are likely stranded travelers. Travel companies can now reach these stranded travelers through their smartphones using mobile apps and mobile websites in order to turn the anxiety of being stranded in an unfamiliar location into a positive experience, resulting in revenue and great impression of the travel company.

IHG has developed some best practices for how we approach crafting apps and mobile websites that willl meet the needs of stranded travelers:

  •           Focus on 2 to 3 Core Tasks

    Smartphones dont have the large amounts of screenspace that a desktop computer has, travel companies must decide on the 2 to 3 most important tasks for the stranded traveler and focus on delivering those.

  • Empathize With the Stranded Traveler
    The best way to decide what those 2 to 3 tasks are is to walk in the shoes of a stranded traveler. On your next trip (if you’re brave enough), wait until you land at the airport to make a hotel reservation. What information do you need to make the booking and what are the pain points?

  • Make the Purchase Path FAST and EASY
    Travelers will have their hands full of luggage and tired children. They will be rushing to find a hotel room before the last shuttle leaves the airport. They may be in foreign territory with spotty or expensive data connectivity. The purchase process must be highly streamlined or customers will abandon the purchase. IHG’s mobile apps open directly to a map of nearby hotels with prices for that night.
  • Don’t Forget the Post-Purchase Experience
    The strength of the smartphone is it goes with the traveler once the booking is made. How can it assist in not only booking, but every aspect of the travel experience. For example, provide real-time driving directions from the user’s current location to the hotel.

The opportunities for travel companies to reach stranded travelers is growing fast and the risk of frustrating an already frustrated user is high, but if travel companies start with these basic guidelines to drive their mobile apps and websites then the end result should be positive travel experiences for their customers.

Darin Wonn is Product Manager for Mobile Apps at InterContinental Hotels Group. Follow him on twitter @darinwonn.

To hear more about IHG’s work in the mobile marketing space, join us this March at The Mobile Marketing Conference. Darin will be speaking on The Mobile Traveler on Tuesday, March 20th, 2012. Download the brochure here to learn more.


Gartner Says Nokia to Blame for Low Smartphone Purchases

PCWorld.com reports today that although sales of smartphones have risen in Q3 of 2009, the increase was much lower than anticipated. Gartner, the market research firm, believes that Nokia’s smartphones may be to blame. Mikael Rickn??s, IDG News Service reports:

But the third quarter was a disappointment — mainly due to Nokia’s lack of attractive high-end smartphones. And consumers who like Nokia’s products are not necessarily buying smartphones from other vendors, so the market is taking a hit, according to Carolina Milanesi, research director at Gartner.

Still, in 2013 more than every third phone sold will be a smartphone, unless mobile operators persist at packaging smartphones with flat-rate data plans, which could put the total cost out of reach for many consumers, according to Milanesi.

What do you think about smartphone purchases — is Nokia really to blame?

Learn more: Smartphone Sales Increase Disappoints, Says Gartner