Tag Archives: Qualitative Research

Using Design Thinking for a Family Glamping Trip

How can we make our marketing research projects even
better’?
is a question we often ask ourselves here at April Bell Research Group.  So, it’s awesome when you find a framework to
do just that! I first learned about Design Thinking from Lisa Helminiak, founder of a
human-centered design firm, Azul 7.  We met at a women-owned businesstraining event, where she turned me on
to some great resources from Stanford’s Institute ofDesign: d.school
Since then, we have
used this thinking in many of our research projects.  When I heard about Azul 7′s Design Thinking Workshop/Bootcamp, I decided to trek up to Minneapolis to attend.  I wanted to deepen my
understanding and find new ways to implement it into our research
practice.  What I discovered is that
Design-Thinking is more than a ‘process’, it’s a way of life.
This mindset includes:
  • Focusing on what others need
  • Feeling free to experiment while working through
    a process
  • Getting really clear about what you’re trying to
    solve.
  • Having a ‘bias toward action’
  • Radial collaboration

It’s a simple process to reshape thinking. You state the challenge, and then
follow 5 steps ‘ Empathize, Define, Ideate, Prototype and Test ‘ to elevate
creative thinking.
Creativity is an
essential skill for leaders trying to make a difference. Yet developing the
ability to think and act creatively remains a thorny challenge. While there’s a
hunger for skill development, elevating creative confidence doesn’t happen via
traditional modes of executive education.
Tim Brown, IDEO’s President and CEO
Here’s how I incorporated Design Thinking as I planned my
trip to the Boot Camp!
State the Challenge:  How can
I take 3+ days away for training when I have so many obligations with work and
family?
The Steps:
  • Empathize
    ‘ immerse yourself, observe what people are doing, how they’re doing it and
    why. Discover other’s views.  Sidenote: this is MUCH easier to do
    professionally as a moderator than it is with your immediate family!!! 
    But here’s what I got from the ‘empathy
    gathering’ stage:

o  
My husband and daughter didn’t want me to drag
them along on a trip where I was unavailable for most of the day.
o  
They also didn’t want me to go on a trip unless
it was a ‘real vacation.’
o  
They wanted to go ‘camping’ ‘ I did not.
o  
I didn’t want to feel guilty about going.
o  
I wanted to create a great experience for
everyone.

  •  Define
    ‘ this is tricky because you’re still not solving ‘ you’re just unpacking what
    you learned, and getting clarity on WHAT needs to be solved. ‘Unpack’ all of
    your learnings, then translate these into a Point of View statement ‘ (User)needs‘ (Need) ‘because’ (Insight)

o  
My definition: 
?? 
The Family
(User) needs’
?? 
‘to find individual
activities while vacationing together
(Need) because’
?? 
‘we want
to be together yet have our own idea of what ‘fun’ looks like!
(Insight)
  • Ideate ‘ our ‘family’ brainstorm looked a little different than the typical innovation ideation sessions we facilitate with our clients but let’s just say our little familia ‘tried‘ to build on each other’s ideas.  And we ‘tried’ not to judge each other’s opinions (some of us were better than others but I’m not pointing any fingers!)  And, my 5 year old is DEFINITELY the most creative and best ‘ideator’ of the family!
  • Prototype
    ‘ You stop talking (and thinking) in this step – and start building.  It’s a challenge because our nature ‘ at
    least mine ‘ is to get it right, get it perfect before showing others. This
    step forces the reverse thinking.  To get
    better, you must build/create something to test SO THAT IT CAN get better for
    the user! 
  • Test ‘ Then,
    we tested our first ever 10-day Family Glamping + Training trip!  Our user testing was ‘doing it.’  Would we do it differently next time?  Yes, we would tweak a few things like making
    sure our A/C in the camper was working properly before departing.  And allowing 2 weeks for the trip, not 10
    days’but we learned a lot.  This was our
    ‘prototype’:

1.    
Pull camper from Dallas to Oklahoma, spent
our first night in Sequoyah State Park in Hulbert, OK
2.    
Migrated
to Des Moines, IA where we played with our friends, then left our daughter +
camper to play longer.
3.    
Husband
and I drove on to Minneapolis where I attended Azul’s Design-Thinking Boot Camp and
hubby happily biked in a city with some of the best biking trails in the US.  
4.    
Then,
we made our way back home, picking up our daughter and camper in Iowa
5.    
Spent
2 more nights in Kansas before heading back to Dallas.
Here’s a visual map we made
with Fotor, another fun tool we’ve added to our tool kit. That
and PicMonkey are
both great  at quickly helping you bring
ideas to life visually for ‘quick DIY design needs.’
Loved the Boot
Camp. And Design Thinking has not only enhanced our innovation projects but
also helped us create a mindset for innovation in our boutique business and even personally!
April Bell. Owner, Researcher, Facilitator and the ‘force of nature’ at April Bell Research Group, a full service boutique market research agency helping researchers shine.

Desktop to Wrist Watch Surveys: The Future of Market Research

When was the last time you recall sitting at your computer with leisure time to Web search as you please? Between commuting, longer days at work, squeezing in that workout, and finally eating, it is becoming very uncommon for one to find time to sit down at a computer and search the Internet. Minimal leisure Internet time therefore makes reaching potential online survey panelists even more tough to reach.
How is this impacting the data collected from online market research? For traditional online surveys, it seems it is becoming harder and harder to reach preferred data numbers let alone certain target groups. Where does this lead us to and how can we overcome this obstacle?
The most obvious and trending answer brings us to mobile. Allowing users to take abbreviated, reformatted surveys via mobile device is one way to increase sample size and reach what was traditionally called the ‘general population.’ Making the survey-taking experience simplified, convenient, and ready for today’s constant on-the-go consumers will drastically change the current problem of unreachable respondents. In addition to reaching more consumers, mobile has numerous advantages over traditional desktop online surveys. Take, for instance, geolocation capabilities which allow for tailoring of surveys according to the respondent’s location. Or in-store research, allowing customers to actually be in store making tradeoffs and purchases to evaluate choices in the environment we try to replicate online. Qualitative research can be enhanced with mobile devices, allowing respondents to video their shopping experience and take images.
Similarly, smart eyewear has recently come into play within the market research realm. Allowing for even more consumer behavior analysis, this technology will play a large roll in qualitative research in the years to come. Voice capabilities, eye-tracking, geolocation, you name it- these weapons of market research will change the industry!
Both of these alternatives have been discovered and are currently being explored for use. What options could 2015 bring? I believe the visual options have advanced far enough and we now must turn to understanding consumer behavior from a psychological standpoint. How can we measure what consumers really are thinking and understand this down to a neurological level. How does this then interplay with rational vs. emotional decision making models and how can we use this to influence consumers? Will the next generation eyewear include on the fly brain scans? Will the smart watch measure circulating neurotransmitters and predict choice behavior?
Changing times come with changing measures. To remain relevant we must approach this development with open arms and continue to keep looking forward!
Janel Parker, Market Research Consultant at SKIM, an international consultancy and marketing research agency, has a background in Marketing and Psychology from Cornell University. Her previous experience at a social media agency combined with her knowledge from SKIM provide for a unique understanding of the relationships between social media and marketing. She can be reached at j.parker@skimgroup.com.

Desktop to Wrist Watch Surveys: The Future of Market Research

When was the last time you recall sitting at your computer
with leisure time to web search as you please? Between commuting, longer days
at work, squeezing in that workout, and finally eating. It is becoming very
uncommon for one to find time to sit down at a computer and search the
internet. Minimal leisure Internet time therefore makes reaching potential
online survey panelists even more tough to reach.
How is this impacting the data collected from online market
research? For traditional online surveys, it seems it is becoming harder and
harder to reach preferred data numbers let alone certain target groups. Where
does this lead us to and how can we overcome this obstacle?
The most obvious and trending answer brings us to mobile.
Allowing users to take abbreviated, reformatted surveys via mobile device is
one way to increase sample size and reach what was traditionally called the
‘general population.’ Making the survey-taking experience simplified,
convenient, and ready for today’s constant on-the-go consumers will drastically
change
the current problem of unreachable respondents. In addition to
reaching more consumers, mobile has numerous advantages over traditional
desktop online surveys. Take, for instance, geolocation capabilities which
allow for tailoring of surveys according to the respondent’s location. Or
in-store research, allowing customers to actually be in store making tradeoffs
and purchases to evaluate choices in the environment we try to replicate
online. Qualitative research can be enhanced with mobile devices, allowing
respondents to video their shopping experience and take images.
Similarly, smart eyewear has recently come into play within
the market research realm. Allowing for even more consumer behavior analysis,
this technology will play a large roll in qualitative research in the years to
come. Voice capabilities, eye-tracking, geolocation, you name it- these weapons
of market research will change the industry!
Both of these alternatives have been discovered and are
currently being explored for use. What options could 2015
bring? I believe the visual options have advanced far enough and we now must
turn to understanding consumer behavior from a psychological standpoint. How
can we measure what consumers really are thinking and understand this down to a
neurological level. How does this then interplay with rational vs. emotional
decision making models and how can we use this to influence consumers? Will the
next generation eyewear include on the fly brain scans? Will the smart watch measure
circulating neurotransmitters and predict choice behavior?
Changing times come with changing measures. To remain
relevant we must approach this development with open arms and continue to keep
looking forward
!
Janel Parker, Market
Research Consultant at SKIM, an international consultancy and marketing
research agency, has a background in Marketing and Psychology from Cornell
University. Her previous experience at a social media agency combined with her
knowledge from SKIM provide for a unique understanding of the relationships
between social media and marketing. She can be reached at
j.parker@skimgroup.com.

Qualitative Research: If it ain’t science, it’s crap

Without a doubt, quantitative research is science. It involves systematic observation and experimentation to better understand consumer behaviour.

Surveys represent the bulk of our quantitative work, converting wide-ranging written and verbal, and positive and negative opinions into carefully coded numerical values that can range from -100 to 100. Neuroscience converts brain waves, skin responses, and eye-tracking behaviours into even finer grains allowing us to better understand the differences between men and women, buyers and browsers, high-income and low-income people, and so many other distinct groups of people. Big data has jumped on the science bandwagon with even more intensity. Billions and trillions of numbers can be categorized and re-categorized into untold numbers of groups and associated with untold numbers of perfectly coded, perfectly transcribed analyzable data points.

But qualitative research? That’s a completely different story. To be valid and reliable, as well as reputable and respected, marketing research needs to behave as a science. Does qualitative research meet the criteria to be considered a science?

First, science is systematic. Are any of these characteristics systematic?

Delineation of precise characteristics in the selection of individual interview participants, according to demographic, psychographics, and personality characteristics such as age, gender, income, education, region, language, sociability, product usage, product opinions, and more


Preparation of standardized discussion guides to ensure consistency across multiple focus groups and multiple interviews

Standardized training of group and session leaders to avoid introducing, creating, or encouraging bias due to group think, dominant group members, reluctant group members, hostile group members or any of the wide assortment of other potential problems


Detailed understanding and selection of the tool best suited to uncover the problem at hand from among hundreds of possibilities such as grounded theory, narratology, storytelling, ethnography, shadowing, participant observation, focus groups, interviews

Detailed methods for converting non-verbal and non-numerical results into standardized data points such as coding books used for both manual and computer-assisted coding

Second, science is experimental. Are these characteristics experimental?

Preparing products in a variety of colours, shapes, sizes, formats such that research participants can be exposed to some or all of them in pre-determined orders


Examining the reliability and consistency of opinions, across people, across groups, etc, by choosing complimentary and/or contradictory research tools and research leaders

I recently spoke with a qualitative researcher who insisted that qualitative research isn’t science. They insisted that qualitative researchers can’t talk about data and can’t use numbers except in nominal ways. Perhaps some qualitative researchers take pride in not partaking in science. Maybe it’s a nice topic of discussion when it comes to talking with clients about why they should go with one method or another. Maybe my friend is wrong.

Is qualitative research is a science? I have to say yes.

Annie Pettit, PhD is the Chief Research Officer at Peanut Labs, a company specializing in self-serve panel sample. Annie is a methodologist focused on data quality, listening research, and survey methods. She won Best Methodological Paper at Esomar 2013, and the 2011 AMA David K. Hardin Award. Annie tweets at @LoveStats and can be reached at annie@peanutlabs.com.

Live From #TMRE13: Fast, Better and Cheaper Multi-National Qualitative

In the world of technology today, we are starting to change
the way we view things. So, what if qualitative research were no longer
constraint by distance, time, language and place? What would happen to your
business?

At TMRE 2013 in Nashville, TN this afternoon Jim Bryson, CEO
of 20/20 discussed how market researchers could deliver more insights, faster,
from anywhere in the world without constraints. ‘Don’t put limits on your world
just because it’s the way it has always been because it’s not anymore,’ he
explained.
When you are doing global research, you spend all of our
time on the plane not really talking to people. Global research in the past has
been incredibly tiring, expensive and difficult. So, what if we conquered
distance?

According to Bryson, the Internet has allowed us to achieve this.
By 2012, the Internet hit critical mass (82 percent) so we could begin to do research
using the Internet. All of the sudden the Internet came along and gave us the
ability to chip away at the problem of distance. For example, chat rooms became
an effective method for research by way of the Internet.
What about time? Time still causes a huge problem when you
want to talk to someone in other time zones. But, Internet forums solved the
time problem since people didn’t have to be there at the same. ‘Now, we can
talk to people across different time zones on their schedule, not our schedule,’
he added.
Additionally, this allowed us to do longitudinal qualitative
research (research over time). If you want to conduct a global project, you can
no matter where they live.
What if we conquered language? Researchers have always had
problems with language, but it is really important in qualitative research. Luckily,
instant translation like Google translate has made this possible. And further,
you can use a human to audit the translation to ensure it’s correct.
Lastly, what if we conquered place? You can mobile to talk
to respondents anywhere in the world. They can show you and ask questions about
all from their mobile phone.
‘You are with them without actually being there,’ explained
Bryson. ‘We are eradicating the need for distance, time, language, and place.’

About the
Author:  Amanda Ciccatelli, Social Media Strategist of the Marketing Division at IIR USA, has a background in digital and
print journalism, covering a variety of topics in business strategy, marketing,
and technology. Amanda is the Editor at Large for several of IIR’s blogs
including Next Big DesignCustomers 1st, and ProjectWorld and World Congress for Business
Analysts
. She previously worked at Technology Marketing Corporation as a
Web Editor where she covered breaking news and feature stories in the
technology industry. She can be reached at aciccatelli@iirusa.com. Follow
her at @AmandaCicc 

A new way to get insights, everyday

Today we turn our attention to building a better relationship with consumers:
At iModerate, we are constantly asking ourselves – how can we facilitate better communication between our clients and their consumers? 
We believe in the power of individual conversations, not just to gain insight around that big tracker or ad test, but as a way to answer your everyday questions and keep your finger on the pulse of your consumers.
Therefore, we are introducing a new way to work with us, one that enables you to easily establish consistent, fruitful dialogues with customers, fans, and desired market segments. 
iModerate’s new subscription service provides you with a bank of conversations that you and your colleagues can quickly draw from whenever issues or questions arise. 
With just one phone call you have access to professionally moderated qualitative conversations that deliver a level of insight that goes deeper into the minds of your consumers, uncovering what truly matters to them.
Beyond securing a better way to talk to consumers, the subscription offering allows you to achieve savings of up to 20%, secure preferential fielding windows, unlock more deliverable options and enjoy a simplified, streamlined process. 
How transformative can this be? Find out how it’s changed our marketers by checking out our comic strip series’ www.imoderate.com/superhero
About the Author
iModerate is a qualitative research firm that goes beyond the obvious by connecting with consumers through real-time, online, one-on-one conversations. Utilized within an online survey for a hybrid approach or as a stand-alone qualitative method, our professionally moderated conversations deliver candid feedback and give you more of the insight that matters to you.
iModerate Research Technologies is a sponsor of The Future of Consumer Intelligence and The Market Research Event and will join us on site to explore we can transform market research together.

A look back at TMRE 2009: Learning What’s Good at Goodyear

The Market Research Event 2010 is taking place this November 8-10, 2010 in San Diego, California. Every Friday leading up to the event, we’ll be recapping one session from The Market Research Event 2009.

Learning What’s Good at Goodyear

Kim White presented on how Goodyear used a variety of qualitative research techniques:

immersions, peer focus groups, and learning connects to fully understand their consumer’s retail experience.
The techniques, developed by MarketVision Research, were creative and insightful…and combined, they allowed the consumer voice to be loud and clear to their c-level management as well as their dealers.
One of the many creative qualitative exercises utilized Grove templates. I have also found these templates helpful in a number of different research projects. (You can go online and download the smaller deck of cards … or you can order larger, wall-size templates for group facilitation exercises.)
The specific template used in Goodyear’s research was an Idea Wheel that helped convey consumer’s wishes and ideas around the buying experience.
Another very cool exercise included a “Retailer Personality creation” where participants had to “create” the personality of retailers with available supplies. This was an interesting way to gain insight on how retailers are perceived.
Taking this to CEO gave their upper management an understanding of how consumers view them as a retailer and thus, drove change throughout the organization.

The importance of qualitative research

At eBusiness, they recently looked at the importance of qualitative research in international markets. While the survey method is most frequently used to collect data, in many situations, qualitative data may provide more insight and better aid decisions.

This article focuses on these specific techniques for qualitative data collection:
1. Observational and quasi-observational techniques
2. Projective techniques
3. In-depth interviews

Read the full article here.

Free Webinar – The Search for Meaning in Fuzzy Data: Can Advanced Statistical Techniques Be Applied to Qualitative Research?

Date: Thursday, January 28th
Time: 11:00am – 12:00pm EST
Register: https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/965782985
Mention priority code MWS0019BLOG

Can Advanced Statistical Techniques Be Applied to Qualitative Data?

* Are you familiar with factor analysis?
* How about color analysis of images?
* Have you ever applied quantitative analysis to qualitative or projective techniques?

Traditionally, online research has been purely quantitative and focused primarily on numeric data. While qualitative research highlights thematic and sub-conscious learning, sometimes fuzzier findings or unstructured data. However, as qualitative and projective techniques are used online with more robust sample sizes, new ways to analyze the data emerge. Sometime you get surprising results.

For nearly 10 years, BuzzBack has been pioneering innovative online qualitative techniques, developing award-winning ways to collect and analyze online qualitative data. Our techniques, including eCollageTM and Verbatim ViewerTM, have been recognized by today’s leading research organizations.

Through a case study approach, this webinar will highlight new ways you can analyze unstructured data ‘ even applying traditionally quantitative approaches. You’ll learn:

* What factor analysis is and how it’s traditionally used
* How factor analysis can be applied to qualitative findings
* Ways color analysis can be applied to online collaging

Join Allan Due, VP Research Analytics of BuzzBack, and explore new ways to find meaning in fuzzy data.

Featured Speaker:
Allan has over 10 years’ experience in Marketing Research. Prior to working at BuzzBack, Allan was VP, New Products and Databases at Ipsos-ASI where he planned, developed, and implemented New Product initiatives including Next-Idea; An Online Kids Test to measure ad effectiveness and Online Modeled Reach Measures. Allan was also responsible for all Online testing methodologies at Ipsos-ASI. Prior to that Allan was a professor at Fordham University for 6 years where he was the Director of the Psychometrics program. Allan completed Ph.D. programs in Psychometrics and Counseling Psychology at the University of Minnesota.

Learning What’s Good at Goodyear

Kim White presented on how Goodyear used a variety of qualitative research techniques:

immersions, peer focus groups, and learning connects to fully understand their consumer’s retail experience.
The techniques, developed by MarketVision Research, were creative and insightful…and combined, they allowed the consumer voice to be loud and clear to their c-level management as well as their dealers.
One of the many creative qualitative exercises utilized Grove templates. I have also found these templates helpful in a number of different research projects. (You can go online and download the smaller deck of cards … or you can order larger, wall-size templates for group facilitation exercises.)
The specific template used in Goodyear’s research was an Idea Wheel that helped convey consumer’s wishes and ideas around the buying experience.
Another very cool exercise included a “Retailer Personality creation” where participants had to “create” the personality of retailers with available supplies. This was an interesting way to gain insight on how retailers are perceived.
Taking this to CEO gave their upper management an understanding of how consumers view them as a retailer and thus, drove change throughout the organization.