Tag Archives: Pfizer

Live From #TMRE13: How to Defend Market Share from Disruptive Category Entrants

At TMRE 2013 in Nashville this afternoon, Anne Hale, Ph.D.,
BAI US Specialty Care Lead, Pfizer and Chet Zalesky, President, CMI spoke about
informing brand strategy in the pharmaceutical industry.
Today, in the pharma industry, you simply can’t hide from
your competitors as there are very few of them. A few years ago, Pfizer had a brand
that was competing in a market that was not dynamic. The company was confident
that its segmentation was very effective and its share remained stable over
time.
‘We were feeling very comfortable with business as usual strategy,
but there were disruptive elements on the business horizon,’ explained Hale. We
can predict the future far more accurately than most industries.’
According to Hale, you have to figure out what will be a
game-changer vs. something like a ‘little pebble in a pond’. In the pharma
industry this process must be begin years before the launch of a product because
it needs a long lead time. ‘We realized we didn’t have a plan in place for this
game-changer, and we could take a substantial hit,’ said Hale.
So, what did Pfizer do? It wanted to proactively refine the brand
strategy in anticipation of the disruptive event. The company needed to do
several things including target opportunistic segments, prepare differential
messaging, create new sales aids, and train the sales force.
Then, Pfizer held workshops to help frame the decision pathways
it was thinking about, move to a quantitative study, and further, to a
segmentation. Almost a year and half out, the company had develop all of the possible
profiles and what it needed to be concerned about for the final process ‘ and finally
pull all the pieces together.
There are a lot of reasons people do something. Pfizer
wanted to understand the different triggers to know why exactly they happen. According
to Hale, Pfizer used the Decision Pathway Process to take the specific pathway created
and find out what physicians are making decisions in a similar way. This allows
for differential messaging to target the trigger points on their decision pathway,
and ultimately, move from triggers to segments.
For Pfizer’s path, a lot of the variables had a lot to do with
the patients. Hale said, ‘We got an idea what the market looked like (patient-centered,
low risk, and key opinion leader), then we needed to look at what our segments
looked like to develop a strategy.’

About
the Author:  Amanda Ciccatelli, Social Media Strategist of the Marketing Division at IIR USA, has a background in digital and
print journalism, covering a variety of topics in business strategy, marketing,
and technology. Amanda is the Editor at Large for several of IIR’s blogs
including Next Big DesignCustomers 1st, and ProjectWorld and World Congress for Business
Analysts
. She previously worked at Technology Marketing Corporation as a
Web Editor where she covered breaking news and feature stories in the
technology industry. She can be reached at aciccatelli@iirusa.com. Follow
her at 

Live from #TMRE13: Connect. Dream. Create.

Yesterday, I was able to attend Connect.Dream.Create. presented by Laura Flessner of Pfizer Consumer Healthcare and Marty Gage of Lextant.

Laura and Marty talked about “DCE’s” – Desired Consumer Experiences and how being able to connect the aspirations of your customers with specific design attributes provides a concrete, actionable foundation for innovation!

As Pfizer strives to become a more design-oriented organization, they knew they had to create a framework to enhance their innovation process’something that could give their consumers an experience they desired. (i.e. Starbucks’ sensory cues: their menu language, music, type of furniture, baristas).

And what they discovered about using this DCE model is that once it gained internal momentum, it became repeatable!!

 Speaking of innovation, I loved Laura’s innovative use of her Cowboy Boots with her suit! I’m trying to figure out what brand they are because I love them!!

April Bell is Principal and Founder of April Bell Research Group, a boutique, full-service marketing research firm, committed to delivering fresh insights you can act on! Learn more at aprilbellresearch.com.

Webinar Invite: The Non-user Fallacy

Join us for this live presentation exploring How Abreva Leveraged Loyalists to Convert Non-users:

Details:
Wed, Apr 3, 2013
11:00 AM EDT
Hosted by: TMRE & Brandtrust

Register here: https://cc.readytalk.com/r/um8mzjrxq165

At the time of the study, the Abreva team possessed considerable knowledge regarding the category and consumer’s needs and motivations. However, the brand did not understand the disconnect between non users desires for treatment and the rationalizations at shelf to choose less expensive, second tier brands. Why was the Abreva team missing the mark with non users when all signs pointed to ‘yes’? They were chasing the wrong idea and asking the wrong questions.

While a typical approach would focus on studying non-users and uncovering their attitudes toward the brand and their rationale for not using the brand, Abreva partnered with Brandtrust to understand how and why non-users became users. By focusing on those who currently use the brand, the brand was able to not only uncover what obstacles prevent non-users from trial but also what motivates non-users to move into trial.

In this live presentation, you will learn:

‘ Why reframing the research question may reveal a more valuable source of insight.
‘ Why studying brand loyalists offers more insight than can be leveraged to bring non-users and rejecters into the brand.
‘ How emotional insights can transform a campaign from one focused on rational benefits to one that connects to consumers at a deeper, psychological level.

We look forward to chatting with you on April 3, 2013.

Presented By Elizabeth Latoracca and Kristian Aloma

Elizabeth Latoracca is the Global Insights Director of Pain Management at GlaxoSmithKline. She has worked within market research and insights for over 20 years, starting her career on the supplier side with Perq, Captone and Spectra, and then shifted to the client side with Warner Lambert, Pfizer and, for the last six years, GSK. Outside the office, Elizabeth enjoys spending her time with her husband and two children, running, reading and cooking.

Kristian Aloma is a Senior Consultant, Team Lead, at Brandtrust, has over a decade of experience in developing and improving brands across industries. He is currently finishing his Ph.D. in Narrative Theory, a.k.a. the psychology of story, with the hopes of understanding better how consumers make meaning of the world around them and how brands become integrated into their personal narratives. Kristian lives in Florida with his wife and two children, and in his fleeting spare time, he loves to geek out on cutting edge technology.

Brandtrust is a leader in deep social science led emotional research methods that reveal the unarticulated needs of consumers specific to your category and brand.
www.brandtrust.com

A Look Back at TMRE 2009: Decision Pathway Modeling: Understanding How Your Customers Get To Yes

The Market Research Event 2010 is taking place this November 8-10, 2010 in San Diego, California. Every Friday leading up to the event, we’ll be recapping one session from The Market Research Event 2009.

Decision Pathway Modeling: Understanding How Your Customers Get To Yes

Decision Pathway Modeling: Understanding How Your Customers Get To Yes
Mike Mabey, CMI
Anne Hale, Pfizer, Inc.

For Pharma, key metrics are adoption (will a physician prescribe this product), patient adherence and compliance, intent to fill and prescribe, brand perception and brand loyalty. Many drugs will go off patent, and the patients will still want to continue takig the name brand product.
Decision pathway modeling is structural equation modeling at the practice level.
The structural model, using It combines factor analysis and regression analysis, shows new strategy. It shows how constructs interrelate, such as quality service price value satisfaction and loyalty. What strategies can you put together to make the best product?

Key steps to pathway modeling:
1. Identify brand/business objectives ‘ entire team must be on same page for results
2. Build a hypothesized brand model ‘ they started small to find out ‘the big idea,’ created a hypnotized patient model: ad awareness, condition awareness, information seeking, symptom severity, impact on activities, diagnosed with co-morbid condition, pill burden, length of relationship with physician ‘ these lead to the intent to consult with a doctor (which is not the end point, jus the first step)
3. Drafting the survey ‘ critical, best price is validated multi-item scales
4. Data Collection and Model Building ‘ sample should match business objectives
5. Model interpretation and result read-out ‘ larger than the path coefficient, the stronger the relationship

The only way they could increase the intent to prescribe, they had to go back to the inquiries from the patients.

Advantages of DPM
‘ Can be used on a wade rage of models
‘ Allows brand teams to leverage existing knowledge in drafting the hypothesized models
‘ Caputured indirect effects
‘ Permits simple or complex models

DPM can ‘
-Maps your customers entire journey, from the beginning to the end how you can influence customer behaviors
-Helps your prioritize resources,
- Revels impact on key marketing elements
-Help you understand the impact of early events in the decision pathway impact on eventual actions and outcomes

TMRE 2009: Decision Pathway Modeling: Understanding How Your Customers Get To Yes

Decision Pathway Modeling: Understanding How Your Customers Get To Yes
Mike Mabey, CMI
Anne Hale, Pfizer, Inc.

For Pharma, key metrics are adoption (will a physician prescribe this product), patient adherence and compliance, intent to fill and prescribe, brand perception and brand loyalty. Many drugs will go off patent, and the patients will still want to continue takig the name brand product.
Decision pathway modeling is structural equation modeling at the practice level.
The structural model, using It combines factor analysis and regression analysis, shows new strategy. It shows how constructs interrelate, such as quality service price value satisfaction and loyalty. What strategies can you put together to make the best product?

Key steps to pathway modeling:
1. Identify brand/business objectives ‘ entire team must be on same page for results
2. Build a hypothesized brand model ‘ they started small to find out ‘the big idea,’ created a hypnotized patient model: ad awareness, condition awareness, information seeking, symptom severity, impact on activities, diagnosed with co-morbid condition, pill burden, length of relationship with physician ‘ these lead to the intent to consult with a doctor (which is not the end point, jus the first step)
3. Drafting the survey ‘ critical, best price is validated multi-item scales
4. Data Collection and Model Building ‘ sample should match business objectives
5. Model interpretation and result read-out ‘ larger than the path coefficient, the stronger the relationship

The only way they could increase the intent to prescribe, they had to go back to the inquiries from the patients.

Advantages of DPM
‘ Can be used on a wade rage of models
‘ Allows brand teams to leverage existing knowledge in drafting the hypothesized models
‘ Caputured indirect effects
‘ Permits simple or complex models

DPM can ‘
-Maps your customers entire journey, from the beginning to the end how you can influence customer behaviors
-Helps your prioritize resources,
- Revels impact on key marketing elements
-Help you understand the impact of early events in the decision pathway impact on eventual actions and outcomes