Tag Archives: Peter Gold

Game Changer

Today, our guest post comes from Peter Gold, the CEO of Veraquest. His broad range of research experience lends itself particularly well to the world of omnibus research where clients tend to have an extremely diverse set of needs. Peter’s background as a practice leader has enabled him to develop a business model that is rich in client-centric benefits while simultaneously being very cost-effective. Peter earned a BSBA from the University of Florida and holds an MBA from Boston College.  His company, VeraQuest is a Sponsor at this year’s The Market Research Event.

Game Changer

Stating the obvious, social media has transformed the way we interact with our world. No longer can media take days or weeks to reflect and report on a certain event or person. No way would that be permissible. In the new millenium, we expect our news immediately, concisely and visually. In the United States, about 6 in 10 online adults are searching the Internet every single day for news and information (and another 15% are checking the Internet weekly). That means 60% of all online adults can’t wait even a day to consume the information they feel they need.

For personal (non-work use), social media has become nearly transcendent in the lives of online adults.

  • ‘Almost 2 in 3 online adults access social networking sites like Facebook or MySpace weekly or more often; and 46% access these sites every day. This is nearing the rate at which people use email’ According to our data, 78% of online adults are emailing their friends and family on an at least a weekly basis; and 49% are doing so every day.
  • ‘Approximately 1 in 3 online adults access blogs on a weekly basis (and about 1 in 5 daily). This beats the 11% of online adults who shop online every day.
  • ‘About 1 in 5 online adults use Twitter at least once per week (and about 1 in 10 use Twitter daily).

At work, social media isn’t nearly as transformative, but still its presence cannot be dismissed. We have found recently that for work purposes on a weekly basis, about 1 in 4 online adults use social networking sites like LinkedIn or Facebook; 15% access blogs; and 13% use Twitter.

Our expectation is that these figures will only continue to grow. And, we will keep you apprised as we track these data to see if our hypothesis is correct and whether Americans’ use of social media continues to evolve.

Next week, we will discuss whether the introduction and use of social media has had a positive or negative impact on our world. But before you get a look at that data, what’s your perspective?

Be Happy, Use Social Media

Today, our guest post comes from Peter Gold, the CEO of Veraquest. His broad range of research experience lends itself particularly well to the world of omnibus research where clients tend to have an extremely diverse set of needs. Peter’s background as a practice leader has enabled him to develop a business model that is rich in client-centric benefits while simultaneously being very cost-effective. Peter earned a BSBA from the University of Florida and holds an MBA from Boston College.  His company, VeraQuest is a Sponsor at this year’s The Market Research Event.

Be Happy, Use Social Media

Last week, we spoke about the use of social media and how it has pervaded the lives of online adults in the United States. But today we would like to reflect on whether the now-unavoidable presence of social media has had a positive or negative impact on our world.

In general, Americans tend to lean (and this lean is only ever-so-slight) to the positive when thinking about the impact of social media.

  • ’46% of online adults (only a plurality) believe that the impact of social media has been generally positive. But, the vast majority of this group is in the ‘somewhat’ positive camp.
  • ‘Approximately 1 in 5 online adults feel there has been no real impact by the introduction of social media to our world, which frankly I find hard to believe.
  • ‘About 1 in 3 feel the impact has been negative.

When thinking about social media, its greatest impact seems to lie in changing our collective intellect’ in improving our ability to absorb and reflect on information, causing us to become better thinkers, communicators, and citizens. But this change may have come at a price as emotionally and physically we seem to have lost a step, feeling more anxious and stressed and less physically active, due to our use of social
media.

Specifically according to our data, most online adults feel that social media has caused us to become more:

  • ‘Connected to one another (81%)
  • ‘Informed about the world around us (77%)
  • ‘Willing to try new things (75%)
  • ‘Willing to take risks (67%)
  • ‘Creative (66%)
  • ‘Adaptable to new situations (63%)
  • ‘Self-confident (62%)
  • ‘Effective communicators (61%)
  • ‘Professionally successful (61%)
  • ‘Effective critical thinkers (52%)
  • ‘Thoughtful to the needs of others unlike us (52%)
  • ‘However at the same time, many online adults agree that social media has caused us to become:
  • ‘More isolated (49%)
  • ‘More anxious or stressed (62%)
  • ‘Less physically active (75%) and healthy (57%)

All that said, here is my favorite slice of the data: almost 2 in 3 online adults (64%) say that social media has made us happier ‘ and what’s better than that?

And therein lies the riddle of social media. It has caused us to become more connected, yet more isolated; more cerebral, yet less physically fit; and happier yet more anxious.

Tell us ‘ how often do you use social media? And how do you feel it has changed you personally and the way you interact with the world?

But My Best Friend Has One

Today, our guest post comes from Peter Gold, the CEO of Veraquest. His broad range of research experience lends itself particularly well to the world of omnibus research where clients tend to have an extremely diverse set of needs. Peter’s background as a practice leader has enabled him to develop a business model that is rich in client-centric benefits while simultaneously being very cost-effective. Peter earned a BSBA from the University of Florida and holds an MBA from Boston College.  His company, VeraQuest is a Sponsor at this year’s The Market Research Event.

But My Best Friend Has One

In mid-April, we completed a study on cell phone ownership among children and teens. And, to say that we Americans are a nation divided in our opinions would be an understatement. On average, U.S. adults (who believe it is appropriate for a child to own a phone) say age 13 is the ideal starting age. But really there is no consensus on what the appropriate (or bare minimum) age is ‘.

  • ’11% say it’s totally fine for kids at age 10 or even younger (of which 2% say younger than 7 years old).
  • ‘A plurality (40%) say middle school (ages 11-14) is the right time.
  • ’34% say a child needs to be at least a sophomore in high school (ages 15-17).
  • ‘And 15% say no child should get a cell phone until he or she is fully grown-up and able to vote (i.e., ages 18+).

But even looking at the total U.S. population doesn’t tell the whole story. As with most things child-centric (e.g., ear piercing, snowboarding, planning for the prom), peer pressure, economics, and maybe even some good old fashioned whining and begging come into play. According to the data:

  • ‘Higher income adults are almost twice as likely (as adults with household incomes $75K or below) to say that cell phones are acceptable for kids under age 11 ‘. perhaps because they can afford the phone and the accompanying texting fees that their young adults are sure to drum up.
  • ‘Families with children under 18 in the household are nearly 3 times more likely to say cell phones are appropriate for kids 10 and younger ‘. perhaps because they recognize the value or the need, or they just buckle under the pressure of their pushy pre-teen.

Otherwise interestingly enough, there are no differences by region of the country or gender or education.

Do you have kids in your household? Have you or they taken a stand on getting a cell phone? What’s your age threshold? Not unlike the average, my kids were 15 and 12. My older one paved the way.