Tag Archives: Online shopping

Using Geofencing to Observe Shopper Behavior

This post was originally published on the Research Now blog.

It is widely discussed that mobile opens up incredible
opportunities for researchers. It is perhaps equally widely discussed that
mobile provides challenges for researchers ‘ especially those most reticent to
part with, let’s say, more traditional approaches. I could think of a number of
examples of this two-sided coin, but I’ll leave all of those, save one, for
future discussions.

One that the industry needs to tackle head on is the use of
geolocation for understanding shopper behavior. So much opportunity! But
logistics and analysis is so hard (for many rooted in market research)! The
notion of using geolocation itself for research is no longer new. Geofencing
has been used to target people for research for several years ‘ with the most
commonly used methodologies centered around delivering a survey to someone when
they are in a specific location or after they have left. In many cases this is
a viable approach to understanding shoppers ‘ and getting feedback close to the
point of experience.
Personally, I’m a fan of targeted and efficient research
engagements that ask people to recall their shopping behaviors before they
forget them. But I am also a fan of not having to ask what we don’t really need
to ask, for example who they are, where they shopped, and when. With this idea
in mind, and wanting to piggyback on prior years of researching Americans’
Black Friday shopping habits, we looked to explore how geofencing could be
effectively utilized to understand shoppers with minimal active engagement from
them. So, last Fall, we brainstormed with Placecast and their savvy team of
location-focused researchers on how we could shed new light onto shopping
behaviors around this critical time period for retailers.
While we did end up asking some questions directly of people,
we managed to glean a lot by matching our panelists’ location data with
existing profiling attributes. We discovered, for example, that the most
affluent Walmart shoppers came to the store on Black Friday when compared to
days leading up to and following that day.

The most affluent shoppers also proved to shop early in the
morning in the days immediately prior to and following Black Friday.
Understanding who shops where and when is crucial
to retailers and advertisers as they try to craft relevant messaging and
promotions for holiday sales. Combining geolocation data and associated
advanced analytics with known profiling attributes creates a compelling story
about shopper behavior, one that can be layered with surveys and other data
sources to provide actionable insights.

The industry has an opportunity here ‘ to use geolocation
data in a smart way and one that alleviates much of the survey burden often
placed on participants.

How Millennials Are Changing Their Relationship to Retail

This post was originally
published on Kelton
Global’s blog
.

Consumers of Generation X age and older grew up as
relatively passive shoppers, able to do little more than recommend a product to
a handful of friends, vent to a salesperson or write a letter to corporate
headquarters. But Millennials have a very different relationship with brands
and companies.

As mass-consumption natives, they see themselves as collaborators
and co-marketers instead of ‘the audience’ or ‘the target.’ They’re ready to
champion their favorite brands online ‘ and equally willing to criticize those
with subpar products or ethics. Digitally savvy and highly entrepreneurial, the
Millennial generation departs from the larger consumer base in a few key ways:
They want you to reflect their values.
According to a recent Pew Research study, fifty-five percent of
Millennials’ believe churches and other religious organizations have a positive
impact in the U.S. (Seventy-three percent thought so in 2010). Indeed, more
than one third of Millennials are
not affiliated with any faith
. So they look to brands instead to represent
their values, with around 81 percent of them expecting brands to be
responsible global citizens.  A 2016 Deloitte Millennial Survey revealed that 87
percent of this demographic don’t consider a company successful on financial
merit alone, but want evidence of corporate social responsibility as well.
Millennials are loyal
supporters 
of companies with strong reputations for CSR. Toms, which
sells shoes, sunglasses and apparel, has been a hit because of its
wide-reaching commitment to charitable causes via the One to One CampaignCuyana, which sells
high quality women’s basics and promotes a simpler lifestyle, is also popular
with Millennials. Through its ‘Lean Closet’ initiative, Cuyana offers consumers
the chance to donate clothes to women in need. Customers are offered a $10
credit towards their next purchase for every donation they make.
They crave simplicity.
According to Accenture, spending by Millennials will grow to $1.4
trillion annually by 2020. But their spending mentality is selective; they have
access to a vast range of goods but are highly conscious of the impact of their
consumption. The mindset has shifted from ‘one of everything’ to ‘only the
essentials’ ‘ and they want to know where those essentials were made, by whom
and with what materials.
They have higher expectations for customized, seamless
service.
Just as there has been a shift from material to experiential spending across
generations, the experiential part of the shopping experience has become
increasingly important for Millennials. Mens clothing retailer Bonobos, which
offers a personalized shopping experience in a showroom setting, has struck a
chord with a younger crowd turned off by the generic, impersonal process of
shopping at traditional brick and mortar retailers like the Gap.
They expect you to listen. And activate, quickly.
Millennials love to challenge brands’ and they know how to
do it well. They’ll keep up the pressure on a company until it amends a problem
in a tangible and authentic way. And if they’re frustrated by the slow pace of
change, they won’t hesitate to disrupt the status quo and start their own
company. Having grown up in the era of Shark Tank & Facebook millionaires,
they are natural entrepreneurs with the information, tools and confidence to do
so.
The attitude of the hip new health insurance company Oscar,
which aims to be transparent and unbureaucratic, sums up Millennial attitudes
perfectly. Its website states: ‘We wanted a better healthcare company. So we
built one.’
Brands take note: Millennials don’t want a story dictated to
them ‘ they want to be part of an evolving, authentic narrative that goes
beyond simple marketing and branding.

Key Insights from Omnishopper International 2016

By: Derya
Lawrence, Senior Analyst ‘ Services and Payments at Euromonitor International

Omnishopper
International took place in London in late November 2016, and addressed the
issues impacting the rapidly evolving retailing landscape from the perspectives
of consumers, manufacturers and retailers. This three day event brought
together some of the largest manufacturers in packaged food, electronics and
personal care, alongside grocery and non-grocery retailers and market research
providers, discussing primarily the ways in which commerce is evolving, and
providing practical examples of new methods of information collection that is
made possible through technological developments required to stay ahead of the curve.
Here are four key insights from Omnishopper
International 2016:

Strategising
for the omnishoppers
Commerce is no longer restricted to a
physical outlet. There are now a plethora of commerce facilitators, from
computers to smartphones to consumer appliances to connected cars, all enabling
new ways of shopping and paying. It is important to continuously track and
monitor shopping patterns across the online/offline split to understand how,
holistically, both channels are two sides of the same coin: Shoppers routinely
search online and buy in-store. If they see a better offer at a competitor, or
find a unique proposition at a different banner, they will take their money
there. Because of this dynamic interaction, one of the largest problems for
retailers today is the increase in consumers’ switching between channels and
banners. Thus, in order to acquire new clients, the omnichannel strategy has to
be built around fostering loyalty, through providing a new and better shopping
experience both in store and online.
Embracing
technology
In this mobile-first world, the
possibilities in terms of connecting with the consumer before, during and after
a purchase are endless, though few retailers and manufacturers do it in a
seamless manner. Merchants of all types express a desire to better connect
those dots in order to further other initiatives, such as providing more
meaningful consumer engagement. One highlight in this respect is the arrival of
Virtual Reality technology. VR can not only drive marketing strategies, but can
be used as a tool for consumer engagement for market research purposes.
Traditional research techniques, such as
consumer panels and surveys, have allowed for the collection of strong insight
on the impact of advertising or strategy on growth in specific product groups. Yet,
knowledge on where the market will be growing – and therefore where the
manufacturer should invest its time and money – can be better understood
through embracing new digital means and putting the consumers themselves in the
driving seat. On this note, one of the leading global chocolate manufacturers
shared their insights on how Online Surveys and Communities are helping them
enhance outcomes of marketing campaigns and impulse purchases by allowing
consumers to inform the manufacturers on what products work for them, when they
are more likely to consume certain goods or how likely they are to make a
purchase based on where the product is exhibited on the shelves.
Understanding
consumer behaviour
New digital
technologies allow for the advent of an increasing number of ways to create
more convenient shopping experiences for consumers. Connected appliances,
proliferation of mobile payment methods and a rapid move towards the internet of
things are all altering consumer’s in-store experiences and expectations. Omnishopper
International posed questions and answers on how this evolution impacts
shopping behaviour. If shoppers’ desire for the most time efficient and
convenient experience takes them both to online and offline channels for
different reasons, it is vital to track this behavioural rationale and gather
data for both online and offline to meet changing client expectations.
Once we have an
understanding of the purchasing habits of consumers between online and offline,
an important question is how retailers can intervene in consumer decision making
in order to align consumer behaviour with retailing strategies. For this step,
we are told that the field of Behavioural Economics – led by the likes of
Daniel Kahnemann ‘ that looks at non-rational forces and implicit biases that
condition human choices, is starting to make inroads on marketing and consumer
research. Through this key insight on how and why shoppers interact in the way
they do in a multi-channel environment, understanding the hidden drivers of
purchasing behaviours, retailers can locate the Pivotal Moments where they can make a significant and meaningful
impact on consumers’ purchasing choices.
Future of retail
Due to the
impact of technology, 21st century consumers are increasingly knowledgeable
about what they want and what is on offer. The blurring of sales channels has
contributed greatly to this as shoppers are able to navigate across the
online/offline divide to find the best product for them along the price/quality
spectrum. Now more than ever, from quality of products to pricing, smart
shoppers are more aware and are therefore increasingly purchasing with higher
expectations from retailers and manufacturers. With the availability of more information,
consumers are also increasingly less loyal. In this context, the saying, ‘the
successful retailer is the one that understands what the client wants next’ is
truer than ever.

Successful Retailers Drive Emotional Connections with Consumers

We recently sat down with Bridget Brennan, Author, Why She Buys and CEO, Female Factor. In
our conversation, she shed some light on how omnichannel is impacting retail,
how shoppers are shaping the future of retail, where retail is going in the
next five years, and more.
Here’s what Brennan had to say:
What can retailers do
better to embrace the omnichannel customer journey and experience?
Brennan: Staying
centered on the very human reasons of why people buy (and why they don’t) is
the best compass for anyone. No matter what channel or technology is being
used, retailers that drive an emotional connection with consumers do it through
elements like great service, inspiring experiences, excellent products, good
value and a brand that people want to be a part of. The opportunity is to
play to the strengths of each channel to deliver these elements. One of the
most effective ways to stay in tune with the modern consumer journey is to
conduct qualitative consumer research on a regular basis.
How are shoppers
shaping the future of retail?
Brennan: One of
the big shifts we see across age groups is the desire for services and
experiences. For brick-and-mortar locations, there is an enormous opportunity
to deliver the kind of experiences that people can’t get through a screen. My
local Nordstrom now has a beautiful bar on the second floor, right in the
middle of the men’s section. Every time I go, it’s full of people who are
clearly enjoying themselves. I predict we’re going to see more and more
retailers add both experiential elements and helpful services to their
brick-and-mortar locations.
How is digital
reinventing retail?
Brennan: In too
many ways to count.  Here’s just one: e-commerce has changed the very
definition of ease and convenience.  Which means it won’t be long before
brick-and-mortar retailers change the very definition of what it means to be a
store.
What are some key
points attendees can expect to take away from your session at the event?

Brennan: People
will walk away understanding the most important trends driving women consumers,
and how they can leverage these as a blueprint for meeting women’s wants and
needs.  Women drive 70-80% of consumer spending with their combined buying
power and influence. My goal is to provide actionable insights that help
retailers stay relevant with the world’s most powerful consumers in 2016 and
beyond.

Top 10 Reasons to Attend OmniShopper 2016

This summer hundreds of research & insights
professionals in the retail industry will
join together in Chicago to shape the future…
Will you be a part of it?
Take a look at just a few of the reasons why OmniShopper 2016 is a can’t miss for you and
your team:
??        
Industry legend Daniel Kahneman, Nobel Prize
in Economic Sciences & Best-Selling Author, Thinking, Fast and Slow leads
a conversation with you to better understand what shapes our choices,
judgements and decisions
??        
Transform your category by using virtual
reality – Riddhish Kankariya, VP of Strategy & Insight, Happy Family
Brands will share how they used a virtual store to optimize the brand’s
products on shelf, and how you can take existing concepts and update them to
resonate with the shoppers’ changing needs
??        
Examine multiple methodologies used to
generate shopper and consumer insights – from qualitative to quantitative -
and when and how to apply them with best practices from SmartRevenue, The
Hershey Company, Capre Group and Wrigley
??        
Get behind the science of presentation
excellence as William Greenwald, Founder & Chief Neuroleaderologist,
Windsor Leadership Group, Author, Be A Mindsetter leads a workshop on The Art
of Storytelling 
??        
Explore how gut vs. data will lead to
renaissance in marketing as we connect back to the fundamentals and emotional
engagement through human truths with Jessica Hendrix, President & CEO,
Saatchi & Saatchi X 
??        
Uncover how you can leverage shopper insights
to drive effective path-2-purchase executions to drive category growth like
Heineken USA with Haley Rubin, Digital Shopper Media and Shawn Fitzgerald,
Director, Shopper Intelligence  
??        
Dan Seymour, Director, Shopper Marketing Dell,
reveals how to convert a confused and uncertain shopper to a purchaser and
build loyalty with a more satisfying learning and shopping experience 
??        
Drive faster and more impactful insights with
online insights communities with best practices from Red Bull North America,
who was able to build dynamic and ongoing relationships with their
consumers 
Bayer Consumer Care, The Hershey Company and Campbell’s
soup come together to share how you can reach your shoppers where they plan,
shop and share, taking a closer look at the impact of technology, digital and
eCommerce
Collaborate with retailer and manufacturer leaders – check
out who’s already signed up to attend:
Ace Hardware
Alcon
ALCS
Alter Agenda
Amax Inc
American Greetings
Arc/Leo Burnett
Asics America
AugustineIdeas
Bayer Animal Health
Bayer Consumer Care
Bellomy Research
Brandtrust
Burke
C+R Research
Campbell Soup Company
ChaseDesign
Clorox
ConAgra Foods
Conair
Design Phase
Directions Research
Energizer Personal Care
Estee Lauder Companies
Excel Displays & Packaging
Explorer Research
FCB
Foresight ROI
Georgia Pacific
GfK
Google
GutCheck
Happy Family Brands
Hallmark
Hanesbrands
Harbor Industries
Heineken USA
Horizon Media
InfoScout
Indiana University
Kelley School of Business
Jarden
Jet.com
Kellogg Company
Kimberly Clark
LEGO
Litehouse
Logitech
Lowe’s Home Improvement
Mall of America
Maple Leaf Foods
Mars Inc.
MetrixLab
Mission Foods
Moet Hennessy
Murphy Research
Nestle Purina Petcare
ORC International
OtterBox
P&G
PepsiCo
Philips Design
Publix Super Markets
Red Bull
REMWorks Sleep Store
Sargento Foods
Seismic Group
SmartRevenue
Smucker Foods of Canada
Smurfit Kappa The Americas
Southern Arkansas University
The Hershey Company
The Integer Group
The Marketing Arm
The Mars Agency
True Value Company
Tyson Foods
Univ. of Arkansas Little Rock
US Cellular
USC School of Cinematic Arts
Vista Outdoor
Walmart
W5
Welch’s
WPP
Wrigley
Yanhaas

And more!
Use code OMNI16BL for
$100 off. Don’t miss out: http://bit.ly/1TWyTEH
We hope to see you in Chicago this summer!
Cheers,
The OmniShopper Team
@OmniShopper
#OmniShopperEvent

Top Customer Experience Blog Posts of 2014

We’ve published a lot of interesting, innovative, and inspiring blog posts about customer experience this year, so we wanted to take a moment to look back on the most popular posts of 2014. Here are the topics our readers enjoyed the most this year:
Marketers Adapt to Digital Customer Trends for Holiday Shopping Season: Over the last few years, technology has truly revolutionized retail – Black Friday and the holiday season exemplify that change better than any other time of year. Now, marketers must reassess their strategies as consumers spend increasing amounts online ahead of the shopping weekend in order to capture the online shopping trend. As of late, Black Friday and Cyber Monday  have experienced a change in spending patterns, with the Adobe Digital Index predicting that $2.6bn ‘ an increase of 15 percent ‘ will be spent on Cyber Monday alone, with Black Friday growth up by 28 percent to $2.48bn. The holiday season in the U.S. will aim to break online records for e-commerce spend at $72.41bn, a growth of 16.6 percent in the last year, according to eMarketer. To read the full post, click here.
The Customer Experience: A Journey Best Understood in Reverse?: Even after decades of study, the ‘Customer Experience’ remains a top focus for large and small companies alike. Work from McKinsey about the consumer decision journey (references below) is just one of many recent examples. Millions of dollars and labor hours, and prodigious efforts, are spent on the subject. From time to time, clients ask’usually around the annual budget-setting cycle”What should our priorities be in evaluating customers’ experiences?  What’s the first, most important thing we need to understand’? To read the full post, click here.
Using Consumer Insights to Make Smarter Business Decisions: We sat down with Kelly Harper, Director of Customer Experience Learning at BMO INSTITUTE FOR LEARNING, to discuss how the power of consumer insights help to make smarter decisions in business. Harper goes into how important customer experience is when it comes using customer insights to make the best business decisions possible. You need to think about what type of experiences your organization is giving your customers.  Your consumer insights allows you to understand what is broken in your current experience you are delivering and what is really important to the customer ‘ what are those elements that you have to get right each and every single day. Consumer insights will help you identify and keep track of what is most important to the customer.  To read the full post, click here.
Why Your Brand Needs Social Customer Service: These days, customers aren’t calling your 800 number. Instead, they are getting on Facebook and complaining about you or sending a Tweet about your lousy service. Social customer service is a very different ball game with unique practices, plans and a different timeline. You’d better be listening for online complaints and be ready to respond in real-time or face potentially negative profits. Social customer service emerged because organic online conversations require an immediate response. When a customer complains about you on Facebook or Twitter, you’d better be listening and respond within a short window or poor attitudes about your brand escalate. Social customer service connects your customers with people, both inside and outside of your organization, and with the information they need to solve problems and make better decisions. Not to mention, your customers expect it. To read the full post, click here.
Creating a Positive Customer Experience: When it comes to obtaining and retaining customers, remembering what you learned in kindergarten really isn’t enough anymore. Now, it hinges on the effective use of social media and other Internet-based resources, according to a new study from Consero Group.  Chief Customer Experience Officers will continue to need a variety of new tools and processes to manage the smart consumer effectively and retain customers in a competitive marketplace. More companies recognize the importance of positive customer experience to overall success. But even though budgets and staff sizes are increasing in many firms, many CX executives still lack sufficient resources to run their departments well. To read the full post, click here.
The Power of Personality at Work: We caught up with John Mayer, renowned Professor of Psychology, the University of New Hampshire and Author of Personal Intelligence. We express our personalities in almost everything that we do ‘ in both our personal and professional lives. So, every single day we exhibit some patterns of behavior that are consistent and sometimes respond to particular context. According to Mayer, personal intelligence is the intelligence we use to understand these personalities ‘ whether they in other people or in ourselves. Virtually any organization today is made up of people, so you can think of the organization as an organizational chart, including Presidents, CEOs, managers, etc.  ‘Personal intelligence deals with information at a different level than that,’ explained Mayer. ‘Instead, on top of that organizational chart are real people.’ To read the full post, click here.
Customer Experience Conversations: Crystal Collier: we sat down with Crystal Collier, CEO of CX Act, formerly TARP Worldwide. CX Act has pioneered the science of quantifying, managing and optimizing the customer experience and has remained a leader in the CX market since 1971. Today, through its innovative research, technology and customer interaction programs, it continues to set the standard to improve clients’ customer service performance, customer value and “The Profit of Interaction.’ According to Collier, without considering empathy’from the C-suite to the frontline employee’delivering a superior CX is nearly impossible. Customers are driven largely by emotions, and their behaviors result from feelings. To read the full post, click here.
Customer Experience Innovation: Treat Your Customers Like People: We caught up with Len Ferman, managing director of Ferman Innovation, and former Senior Vice President of Innovation and Ideation at Bank of America. Today, corporate leaders often lose sight of customer needs in the constant quest toward next quarter’s earnings. But, what is positive for stock prices tends to conflict with long term customer satisfaction and shareholder value. You simply can’t understand the customer experience if don’t empathize with your customers, Ferman told me. ‘You have to be able to see them face-to-face and listen to them talk about their pain points and challenges,’ he said. To read the full post, click here
Customer Experience Conversations: Nestor Portillo: Nestor Portillo, Director, Social Communities and Customer Experience at Microsoft shared his best customer experience, the importance of empathy, and how social media has affected customer experience today. According to Portillo, customer experience is a combination of emotions, memories, expectations, needs fulfillment, timing and effort. All of these are important add-ons to your product or service. So, in order to deliver a great customer experience, it needs to have a high degree of empathy and emotion because the interaction goes beyond product functionality or a feature explanation. To read the full post, click here.
Customer Experience Conversations: Janet LeBlanc:  Janet LeBlanc, President of Janet LeBlanc + Associates Inc. LeBlanc discussed how empathy and emotion has a critical impact on customer experience today. According to LeBlanc, the best customer experiences are those that elicit the strong positive feelings and emotions that strengthening the relationship and loyalty a customer has with a company. Statements such as: ‘I felt like she understood what I wanted or they treated me with respect’ are the best examples of a great customer experience. To read the full post, click here.

About the Author: Amanda Ciccatelli, Social Media Strategist of the Marketing Division at IIR USA, has a background in digital and print journalism, covering a variety of topics in business strategy, marketing, and technology. Amanda is the Editor at Large for several of IIR’s blogs including Next Big DesignCustomers 1stDigital Impact, STEAM Accelerator and ProjectWorld and World Congress for Business Analysts, and a regular contributor to Front End of Innovation and The Market Research Event,. She previously worked at Technology Marketing Corporation as a Web Editor where she covered breaking news and feature stories in the technology industry. She can be reached at aciccatelli@iirusa.com. Follow her at @AmandaCicc.

Where Does Online Shopping Leave Glamorous Window Displays?

The holiday season,
despite its one eve of festivity, absorbs anywhere from weeks to months of our
time as shoppers and
consumers
, and even more so if we are marketers.
It evokes the anxiety, well pondered over in days when brands battled for loyal
consumers. Attracting one and all with the glitterarti of lights
that brighten up the night sky for miles, attracting shutterbugs and stories
for lifetimes. One has to think of all the historical, traditional efforts put
into the likes of Macy’s and Harrod’s, juxtaposed against a modern lifestyle of
lesser and lesser offline shopping.
However in today’s world, with retailers opening up stores
way into the middle of the night, if not 24 hours, and with online accounting
for a large chunk of decision making, if not sales, the dynamic has become
muddled, and all the more interesting to explore. Despite decadent window
displays of Christmas chocolate architecture
or humane mannequins in theatrical poses in a luxury London, for
instance, which have perhaps become more tourist attractions than reliable
sources of revenue, many have chosen the online world as a foray into
replacement shopping. Convenient, faster, and to a certain degree, almost less
magical.
On drawing comparisons between the online and offline world,
alongside the regularity of last minute versus planned shoppers, a two by two
matrix
on uncovering four holiday shopping personalities can be deduced.
Let’s call it The Timed Shopping Framework, since it can apply to any phase of
life when we have to shop with a deadline.
Bandwidth Basher


Purchasing Power: High. It’s unlikely that these shoppers will be looking for
deals, but are more in a frantic rush to buy something while multitasking a
busy corporate or bustling alternative life; thus the restraint from going in
stores.

Retailer Benefit: Shipping fees. Consumers in this segment may be blind to free
shipping coupons in all the haste, so retailers can gobble up any margins on
those exorbitant overnight fees.
Strategic Sprawler

Purchasing Power: Moderate. These shoppers will likely have scouted the deals,
almost as early as Black Friday
and Thanksgiving
. Being deal hunters, it’s not to say they are budget
battlers: rather the contrary, they are likely to spend in volume. Call them
indecisive, or on the other spectrum, simply smart with a cool variety of
friends.

Retailer Benefit: Volume purchase and loyalty. It’s likely that these shoppers
will seek deals with enough prowess to use coupon codes or minimum purchase
requirements to benefit retailers, either with volume or future loyalty.
Methodical Maneuverer

Purchasing Power: Moderate. These are traditional shoppers that would rather
drive to the stores come fall, and load up their trunks and rear seats with
less shopping on a periodic basis. And they never forget the wrapping, bows,
cards and frills. These shoppers either have a sense of detail, or are simply
preventing an anxiety
attack, as per a former framework
.

Retailer Benefit: Traditional store sales, which as we all know, may not be
real value sales, but well marketed ones. Nonetheless, courtesy of methodical
research, retailers should not expect these consumers to be strong spenders.
Splurging Sprinter

Purchasing Power: High. These shoppers have simply had no time in bustling
lives, and tend to leave things to the last minute. With about half of their
preferred selections disappearing off shelves, they are likely to be struck by
anxiety and spend more than they need. Sans details, they may skip the frills
and even ask for gift wrapped gifts altogether! Just beware that these folks
may be struck by stress more often than not; even in public.

Retailer Benefit: Revenues from last minute shopping. Retailers can expect high
spending from these consumers, with a slight dose of stress depending on the
level of shopper persistence. It will be easy to entice them with leftover,
often non-sale items, or with stocking stuffers.

Sourabh Sharma, Senior Manager
and Communication & Social Media Research Expert at SKIM, an boutique
marketing research consultancy, has a background in engineering, marketing and
finance from the University of Pennsylvania, and the Wharton School and
Rotterdam School of Management. Having worked in marketing and product
development at L’Oreal, followed by a stint in management consulting, he now
passionately enjoys the world of social media, and can be found on every
platform with his alias sssourabh. He is a food critic and a fashion writer,
and documents these alongside strategy on his blog called 3FS. He may be reached at s.sharma@skimgroup.com. Follow him on @sssourabh.

Marketers Adapt to Digital Customer Trends for Holiday Shopping Season

Over the last few years, technology has truly revolutionized retail. Black Friday and the holiday season exemplify that change better than any other time of year. Now, marketers must reassess their strategies as consumers spend increasing amounts online ahead of the shopping weekend in order to capture the online shopping trend.
As of late, Black Friday and Cyber Monday  have experienced a change in spending patterns, with the Adobe Digital Index predicting that $2.6bn ‘ an increase of 15 percent ‘ will be spent on Cyber Monday alone, with Black Friday growth up by 28 percent to $2.48bn. The holiday season in the U.S. will aim to break online records for e-commerce spend at $72.41bn, a growth of 16.6 percent in the last year, according to eMarketer.
Luke Edson, senior vice president national markets at YP, recently told The Drum that businesses have had to realize the need to focus on the growth of consumers turning to their mobile devices when researching products before making a purchase. ‘Consumers are also connecting to businesses through mobile apps for everything from getting directions to finding a deal. Mobile has the unique ability to target customers in the moment and drive their behavior. What’s more mobile location data can provide key insights on a consumer’s behavioral patterns, including someone’s likes, lifestyle and habits,” he said.  
Customers spend more time online and it is becoming a place where shopping decisions can be influenced. “We know that we need to engage across multiple channels. This holiday season we have increased our focus on social and digital media, including creating an online only holiday gift guide, multiple social sweepstakes across Facebook, Twitter and Instagram, creating video content specifically for YouTube, and pushing content on Pinterest for the first time,’ Brandi Ply, director of marketing strategy at online retailer, Big Lots told The Drum.
Only five years ago mobile marketing and mobile sales for Black Friday did not exist- Black Friday was only about hitting the stores to get the best deals. Now, it seems that it’s more important for marketers to get their best deals on Thanksgiving Day online and through mobile marketing. Even Black Friday is now as much about online as it is about in-store sales.

‘Black Friday is a double-edged sword for most digital marketers. We know consumer engagement is going to be unusually high so it’s an ideal time to try and capture their attention, but we also know that all marketers are having the exact same thought so it can be difficult to stand out in such a crowded space,” said advertising technology company Spongecell chief executive, Ben Kartzman.  “This year, smart digital marketers will focus on delivering a dynamic experience for shoppers that they haven’t necessarily seen before.’

Produce Better Insights and Achieve Greater Business Impact

In association with our event partners, IIR is pleased to
invite you to participate in the following web seminars as a part of the 2013
Insights Webinar Series.
Superior Insights
through Information Integration: Debunking Common Misconceptions and Myths
Thursday, April 25,
2013, 1:00 PM ‘ 2:00 PM ET
Kumar Mehta, Chief
Executive Officer, blueocean market intelligence
Simon Chadwick,
Managing Partner, Cambiar

Research departments are being hit with copious amounts of
data every day –  from primary market research, syndicated data,
transactional data, social media, etc. Synthesizing knowledge from the
information river has become a necessity; a searchable repository and basic
meta analysis is just not good enough. 
 Special guest, Simon Chadwick, Managing Partner of
Cambiar Consulting, will set the stage with an insightful overview about the
future of research and the evolution towards synthesis.
Using real case studies, Kumar Mehta, CEO at blueocean
market intelligence, will reveal how to apply a holistic 360 approach to
produce better insights and achieve greater business impact.  
He will also discuss common myths surrounding typical
departmental challenges – time, money, access ‘ when applying this integrated
approach. Together, Kumar and Simon will share recommendations for creating a
more collaborative exchange between clients and suppliers, and what traits make
for a good synthesizer and thought partner.
Mention your priority code, MWJ0028-LINK, when registering.
A Step Toward
Understanding Path to Purchase: How Shelf Placement Impacts Shoppers’ Attention
at Shelf
Tuesday, April 30,
2013, 1:00 PM – 2:00 PM ET
Rich Scamehorn, Chief
Research Officer, InContext Solutions
Brendan Light, VP
Research, InContext Solutions

There are many elements to each shopper’s Path to Purchase.
This talk will share a framework for understanding how these in-store and
out-of-store elements impact a shopper’s behavior when in-store. This focus on
one specific area will show how virtual store technology can build knowledge
about the impact of shelf placement on where shoppers look first and first
purchase by category.
Mention your priority code, MWJ0029-LINK, when registering.
Capitalizing on the
Power of Big Data: How to Effectively Leverage Big Data to Discover New
Insights and Drive Revenue Growth
Thursday, May 9,
2013, 1:00 PM – 2:00 PM ET
Jerome Levadoux,
Senior Vice President of Products, HP Autonomy

Are you getting everything you can out of your business data?

The rapid explosion of Big Data is changing the way we do business. 90% of data
created in an organization is now unstructured’and inherently more difficult to
manage’coming from sources like social media, video, texts, audio, email and
documents.

And this data is becoming so important, as it contains customer insight and
growth opportunities that have yet to be identified. But due to its volume,
type and rate of change, most companies are unable to address this valuable
data and act on it.

Join us on this webcast and learn how you can easily manage, understand and
leverage all forms of Big Data in real time to discover new opportunities and
increase revenue.

Mention your priority code, MWL0001-LINK, when registering. 

Online retailers now have action points

A recent study by PayPal recently did a study looking into customer behavior when shopping online. They found that price was not the overall determining factor when customers bought items online. It is important that online services provide complete customer service before, during and after a purchase, including quick site speed, accessibility, after sales service and the ability to exchange goods. The research done by PayPal also found that customer registration requirement for small sites accounted for 68% of customers turning away from their purchase. There was an additional 57% of users who cited poor site experience and confusion when it came to navigation made people turn away from making purchases as well. Read more about this at Retail Bulletin.