Tag Archives: omnichannel

Insights Interview: Q&A with Diane Powell, Conagra Brands

We sat down with OmniShopper
speaker Diana Powell who is a Shopper Insights Manager at Conagra Brands, to
discuss how retail is being disrupted.
How has retail been
disrupted?
 
Powell: In the
food industry, traditional grocers are experiencing competition no longer just
from other grocers, but from emerging channels of meal sourcing such as
subscriptions, meal kits, offline and online wholesale/club stores, and
hundreds of new delivery models.  Traditional brick and mortar stores are
having to rethink how they do retail ‘ with more ready-to-go options and
elevating the shopping experience to draw shoppers in.
How has omnichannel
impacted retail positively?
 
Powell: We’ve
been keeping a close eye on ecommerce and how it impacts shopping for
food.  Shoppers view online shopping as complementary to their in-store
experience and most don’t foresee it replacing all in-store.  Shoppers who
are buying groceries in store AND online spend more overall than in-store only
shoppers.
How is this new era
of shopping everywhere impacting shopper insights? 
Powell: We must
be ahead of the digital transformation to keep up with where shoppers
are.  It’s not enough to just send the same old surveys to mobile phones,
but we must find new ways to use cutting age big data to understand online
behaviors that consumers don’t even know they are doing. Also, with the IoT,
behavior and trends change faster than ever, so we need to update research and
findings more frequently as to not lag in our reporting.
Additionally, in the food industry, we’ve also traditionally
spent our time researching women. However, with equal proportions of men
and women millennials doing the grocery shopping, we can’t have blinders to
both genders!
How are shoppers
shaping the future of retail?
Powell: In food
ecommerce, there is a clash between the shopper’s perspective of value and the
retailers when it comes to ecommerce.  Shoppers are used to shopping
online for other categories (electronics, clothing, housewares, cleaning
supplies, etc.) and when they shop online for these products, they are
expecting to get great deals.  They have cost comparison sites and aps at
their fingertips and are quick and savvy deal shoppers.  They apply this
same thinking to their online grocery shopping and expect to find good prices
and deals. 
However, food retailers think that because of the
convenience of online grocery shopping, shoppers should be paying a
premium.  They charge fees for pickup and delivery, charge higher prices
for the same products, don’t integrate as many couponing options, and some even
ask for a tip for the person delivering.  Shoppers are not willing to pay
such a premium (only about $5) and therefore I don’t think we’re seeing the
shift as quickly as it’s happened for other goods.  It will be fascinating
to see how sites like Jet.com and amazon, which are modeled to give shoppers
great prices, will force the traditional brick-and-mortar- e-tailers to step up
their price savings game.
Why is it important
to link digital and physical shopper marketing? 
Powell: Even when
shoppers are in a physical store, they are connected digitally.  Whether
they are using their devices for shopping related activities or not depends on
the minute! A buzz from their purse or pocket triggers a look, a distraction
from the shelf, but also an opportunity to influence.  Of course, we must
be mindful of respecting the shopper’s desires for how often/what we contact
them about ‘ making sure to give the appropriate value exchange customized to
that shopper.
Where do you see retail moving in the next 5 years?
 I’m excited to see a nice balance of the tangible and intangible.  I
think retail shopping will become more immersive, experiential, and
destination-based.  Offering the benefits that are near impossible to
recreate. Perhaps even more analog, more customized. People have a
desire to disconnect sometimes, and to return to the simple. Or on the contrary,
offering high tech in-person experiences that aren’t possible in your own home
is also going to happen.  I’m also excited to see the continuation of the
tech explosion ‘ with voice search leading the way for a lot of cool
innovation.  Deliveries will be faster, subscriptions will grow, and brand
loyalty may make a comeback when shoppers spend more time speaking to their
devices versus searching through.

Don’t miss Powell’s
session, ‘Knowledge
is Power, If You Can Find It!’
on June 20th at 3:40 PM in
Minneapolis, MN. Use code OMNI17BL for $100 off the current rate:
https://goo.gl/XY25DW

Free Webinar: Data Analytics in the Retail Store of the Future

Marketing Analytics & Data Science speaker Dave
Bhattacharjee, VP of Data Analytics for Stanley Black and Decker, was
unfortunately unable to be at the conference last month, but he still wanted to
share his presentation with our community digitally.
In Dave’s upcoming webinar ‘Data
Analytics in the Retail Store of the Future
‘, he will outline the
challenges for brick and mortar retailers and their use of analytics to improve
their business and create the retail store of the future. Brick and mortar
retailers are going through a period of unprecedented change. To remain
competitive, retailers are focused on omni-channel and the use of the retail
store as a competitive advantage for both customer experience and order
fulfillment. The focus for this presentation will be the innovative use of
sensor and video technology, machine learning and the use of blended data to
improve customer lifetime value, marketing analytics, sales lift and margin
optimization.  
Dave will cover topics such as data acquisition and store
instrumentation leveraging the internet of things. He will discuss advances in
video analytics that enable retailers to better understand customer engagement,
experience and behavior. And, he will also discuss the use of blending
unstructured data to enable retailers to better assess promotions and their
impact on sales and margins.
Save your seat for
the webinar on Wednesday, May 31st at 2:00 PM EST: http://bit.ly/2p11Lye
About the Presenter:

Dave Bhattacharjee is the Vice President of Data Analytics
for Stanley Black and Decker. In this role, Dave is responsible for monetizing
Stanley Black and Decker’s data assets. His current projects include analytics
applications for physical security, retail, healthcare, smart factory and
marketing.    
Prior to Stanley Black and Decker, Dave was at Cisco Systems
where as Managing Director, Dave managed and led Cisco’s consulting services
for analytics and big data in the Americas. He has also held leadership
positions at IBM and PriceWaterhouseCoopers where Dave worked with the Fortune
500 on large scale initiatives designed to create business value through data
and technology. He has an MBA from the University of Texas at Austin and a
Bachelors in Computer Science and Engineering from Arizona State University.
  
Cheers,
The Marketing Analytics & Data Science Team

4 Best Practices for Optimizing Packaging for E-Commerce

This post
was originally published on PRS IN VIVO’s blog.

How a new design system is introduced in market can
significantly influence sales.  Here are four ‘best practices for
minimizing risk:
1. Foster Brand
Recognition (via Visual Continuity)

First and foremost, shoppers are looking for reassurance
that they are buying the same product (online) that they know/trust from the
‘brick-and-mortar’ store.  So while pack images may be simplified for Web
‘thumbnails,’ it is important that they retain the brand’s core visual equities
and appearance.
2. Ensure High-Quality
& Informative Visuals

Simply put, some packages ‘ particularly white packs and/or
those that rely on foil, holograms and other tactile elements ‘ do not always
translate well to e-commerce environments and need refinements.  In
addition, a range of images (primary vs. secondary packaging, etc.) may be
necessary to illustrate the functionality and benefits of new packaging
formats.
3. Clearly
Convey/Reassure on Quantity

In the digital context, size impressions can be very
misleading.  Therefore, it is very important to provide clear reassurance
on pack sizing and quantity, particularly to highlight larger sizes.
4. Leverage
Digital Capabilities to Illustrate/Inform 

Perhaps most importantly, the e-commerce context provides
opportunities to inform/educate shoppers that are typically unavailable in
physical environments.  For example, one click can provide a clear explanation
of a full product line, helping shoppers find the right product for their needs
‘ or link to a video illustrate use of a new product.
For more information
about adopting packaging for e-commerce, please read this article here
Or contact PRS IN VIVO to
learn more about our research on the intersection of digital and physical
shopping.

How the Internet of Things is changing the face of retail

By: Ali Newton

This article was originally published on SmallBusiness.co.uk

There hasn’t been an advancement in retail as drastic as the
IoT revolution since the Industrial Revolution. The Internet of Things (IoT) is
the idea that everyday objects can be connected in the same way that computers
are today. And, with consumer adoption of IoT devices on the rise, now is the
perfect time for retailers to get informed and capitalize on the IoT.
Whether it is to improve their overall customer experience,
or to create new revenue streams, the IoT truly is changing the face of retail.
Here are three ways the IoT could be integrated into every aspect of retail ‘
from store displays, to storage equipment, to the shop floor.
1. Smart shelves
Panasonic is currently developing a product called the Powershelf. These shelves
have built-in sensor technology that keeps track of inventory in real-time,
saving businesses thousands of pounds in paid hours that they could reinvest elsewhere.
However, Powershelves also have the potential to be
extremely useful on shop floors, as they can collect data about shoppers based
on the products that they have chosen. In addition, these shelves give
customers real-time prices that are based on demand. The shelf labels are
wireless and can update prices based on the quantities that are left. The
shelves can also detect when the products are about to go out of date, and
alter the price according to this information too.
Jobs like stock counting, market research and stock
replenishment can take human workers hours. Alternatively, they could be
automatically performed by Powershelves talking to each other via the IoT.
2. In-store beacon tech

In-store beacons were set to become very popular for a
while, but they haven’t quite caught on as previously anticipated. Beacons rely
on customers coming within proximity of a shop, at which point they can be sent
a message or an email to encourage them to come into the store ‘ provided that
the shop already has their contact details.
Still, it’s a solid idea in principle. A ’10 per cent
offer when you buy today’ push notification could be sent to the consumers’
mobiles as an incentive to lure them into a shop if they’re nearby.
The issue with beacon technology is that it relies on Bluetooth,
which many consumers don’t have switched on as it is known to drain battery
power. In addition, customers usually need to have the brand’s app downloaded
too. This places several obstacles in the way of the retailer before it can
contact the customer directly.
Despite these obstacles, many brands are using proximity marketing to help drive their retail sales.
3. Smart shopping carts and cashless stores
IoT is a powerful tool for brick and mortar shops to compete
with eCommerce stores that are taking over the retail world. Walmart recently
began to develop shopping carts that can drive themselves to help customers
find their way around its shops. It is also working on a technology that allows
customers to order online and get their shopping delivered by a driverless cart
directly to their car, or Uber, in the car park.
Similarly, Amazon’s Seattle shop has no checkouts. Customers
simply enter the shop, pick up the items they need off the store display, and
leave. Sensors around the shop record the items that customers pick up,
removing the need for them to check out.
Whether or not any of these ideas will become an integral
part of retail’s future remains to be seen. Predicting the future is always
difficult and businesses and individuals are right to be skeptical of anyone
telling them that the future is going to be radically different because of the
IoT.

However, just because people should be skeptical about the
idea that the IoT may change retail entirely, it doesn’t mean that they should
write the idea off altogether. One IoT development is unlikely to change retail
on its own, but as more of these technologies enter the market and they become
more affordable, a greater impact will begin to be seen throughout retail.

Is Amazon in the Room?

By: Laura Sigman

This post was
originally published on the LightSpeed Research blog.

On a recent
earnings call
, Sir Martin Sorrell, CEO of Lightspeed’s parent company WPP, talked
about what keeps him up at night. And no; it’s not (necessarily) his infant
daughter ‘ it’s Amazon.
‘And I would just mention the rise of Amazon, because in
answer to the question, my favorite question is what worries you when you go to
bed at night and when you wake up in the morning. It’s not a three-month-old
child (laughter), it’s Amazon, which is a child still, but not three months.
And Amazon’s penetration of most areas is frightening, if not terrifying to
some, and I think there is a battle brewing between Google and Amazon.’
The fear mostly seems to be of the unknown, as Amazon is
thought to be quietly
pursuing an advertising strategy
 carefully away from the watchful eyes
of Wall
Street
.
Is Amazon really committed? They are by pure virtue of their
strategically evolving business model. By being among the first big players on
the e-commerce scene, they cemented their early adapter consumers to them.
They’ve grown a multimedia offer around their core competency, and now Amazon
knows not only what we read, but what we search for, what we buy, what we
watch, what we listen to. I’m an Amazon Prime customer, and I take advantage of
all of the bells and whistles that come along with it. So they know what
content I’m engaging with, and whether I’m connecting to the content from my
PC, smartphone, tablet or Alexa. And they can leverage this vast supply of
shopper and behavioral data to sell hyper-targeted advertising to brands who
can then speak directly to me.
When you look at it like that, it’s really not much
different than how we’ve worked in the panel world. Historically, we have facilitated
the conversations brands have with consumers, and have evolved by taking
advantage of emerging technologies to help amplify those conversations. And,
like Amazon, we grew our business by embracing early on that panelists
(consumers) are people, too. 
(Believe it or not, it’s not as obvious to
everyone as that sounds!) Today’s consumers want to have meaningful
interactions, but they also want to have them when and where is convenient to
them. So we meet them on their devices of choice; we always design surveys
mobile-first (in fact, Lightspeed has an
entire team dedicated to this
) and we use
data appends
 to reach the right consumer with the right questions. We
invite survey respondents to answer open-ends with video
responses
 ‘ an engaging experience for them resulting in more
meaningful data for brands to act on. We’re able to blur the line between quant
and qual, intercepting surveys with invites to participate in deeper, on-point
conversations. And brands can leverage all of this to create hyper-targeted
advertising that speaks directly to their consumers. Which ties back to that
Amazon example I shared above.
As Kantar pointed out at their FragmentNation
event
, the marketplace is splintering — not with a whimper but with a
bang. So while the ad world should fear the Amazon in the room, it should also
embrace it. It’s an eye-opening reminder that consumers are advertising’s most
valuable assets in a marketplace that is more diverse and fragmented than ever.

Must See Talks from KNect365′s Spring Insights 2017 Events

From former gang leaders, to cyborg anthropologists, to
biomimicry experts- KNect365′s Must See Talks will challenge you to look at
problems in a whole new way and become an ignitor of change for your organization.
‘The Centrality of a Detailed Understanding of your
Audience’ ‘ Haile Owusu, Chief Data Scientist, Mashable
Marketing Analytics & Data Science
April 3-5, 2017
San Francisco, CA
Use code MADS17LI for $100 off.
Buy tickets to see Haile: https://goo.gl/YqXZdx
‘The Consumer Influence ‘ and Impact ‘ of Virtual
Reality’ ‘ Jeremy Bailenson, Founding Director of Stanford University’s Virtual
Human Interaction Lab at Stanford University
TMRE in Focus
May 1-3, 2017
Chicago, IL
Use code FOCUS17LI for $100 off.
Buy tickets to see Jeremy: https://goo.gl/c2UdIv
‘Originals: How Non-Conformists Rule the World’ ‘ Adam
Grant, Professor, Author of Give and Take and Originals at The Wharton School
of Business at the University of Pennsylvania
OmniShopper
June 20-22, 2017
Minneapolis, MN
Use code OMNI17LI for $100 off.
Buy tickets to see Adam: https://goo.gl/oUB85g
‘Underdogs, Misfits
& the Art of Battling Giants’ ‘ Malcom Gladwell, Best-Selling Author of
Outliers, The Tipping Point and David & Goliath
TMRE: The Market Research Event
October 22-25, 2017
Orlando, FL
Use code TMRE17LI for $100 off.
Buy tickets to see
Malcom:
https://goo.gl/gM7Dtv
We hope to see you this
spring!
Cheers,

The KNect 365 Event Team

Using Geofencing to Observe Shopper Behavior

This post was originally published on the Research Now blog.

It is widely discussed that mobile opens up incredible
opportunities for researchers. It is perhaps equally widely discussed that
mobile provides challenges for researchers ‘ especially those most reticent to
part with, let’s say, more traditional approaches. I could think of a number of
examples of this two-sided coin, but I’ll leave all of those, save one, for
future discussions.

One that the industry needs to tackle head on is the use of
geolocation for understanding shopper behavior. So much opportunity! But
logistics and analysis is so hard (for many rooted in market research)! The
notion of using geolocation itself for research is no longer new. Geofencing
has been used to target people for research for several years ‘ with the most
commonly used methodologies centered around delivering a survey to someone when
they are in a specific location or after they have left. In many cases this is
a viable approach to understanding shoppers ‘ and getting feedback close to the
point of experience.
Personally, I’m a fan of targeted and efficient research
engagements that ask people to recall their shopping behaviors before they
forget them. But I am also a fan of not having to ask what we don’t really need
to ask, for example who they are, where they shopped, and when. With this idea
in mind, and wanting to piggyback on prior years of researching Americans’
Black Friday shopping habits, we looked to explore how geofencing could be
effectively utilized to understand shoppers with minimal active engagement from
them. So, last Fall, we brainstormed with Placecast and their savvy team of
location-focused researchers on how we could shed new light onto shopping
behaviors around this critical time period for retailers.
While we did end up asking some questions directly of people,
we managed to glean a lot by matching our panelists’ location data with
existing profiling attributes. We discovered, for example, that the most
affluent Walmart shoppers came to the store on Black Friday when compared to
days leading up to and following that day.

The most affluent shoppers also proved to shop early in the
morning in the days immediately prior to and following Black Friday.
Understanding who shops where and when is crucial
to retailers and advertisers as they try to craft relevant messaging and
promotions for holiday sales. Combining geolocation data and associated
advanced analytics with known profiling attributes creates a compelling story
about shopper behavior, one that can be layered with surveys and other data
sources to provide actionable insights.

The industry has an opportunity here ‘ to use geolocation
data in a smart way and one that alleviates much of the survey burden often
placed on participants.

The OmniShopper 2017 Brochure is Now Available

It’s Time to Throw the Traditional Shopper “Rule Book’
Out the Window. The OmniShopper 2017 Brochure is Here!
We’ve entered a new era in retail ‘ Shopping Everywhere.
It’s not enough to just sit back and watch, we must evolve our insights &
activation strategies to remain competitive and dominate at retail.
Join the brand & retail leaders who’ve mastered end-to-end
omnichannel strategies to deliver seamless shopper experiences at OmniShopper
2017. Download the brochure: https://goo.gl/rR2V8P
OmniShopper 2017
June 20-22
Minneapolis, MN
Visit the website: https://goo.gl/rR2V8P
??        
35+ Speakers including more retailers than ever
before ‘ Walmart, Best Buy, Stitch Fix, Amazon, Gap and more tba! Plus, we’ve
got former Hershey CMO Peter Horst, Buzzfeed’s VP of Research & Insights
Edwin Wong, and Adam Grant, Author of Originals: How Non-Conformists Move the
World
??        
3 Days with the best in shopper insights,
shopper marketing and category management ‘ over 350 senior executives from
consumer goods manufacturers and retailers
??        
40+ Sessions dedicated to helping you super
charge omnichannel insights, activate shopper marketing and uncover next gen
retail methodologies
Are you excited or what?
Use code OMNI17BL for
$100 off the current rate: Buy tickets here:
https://goo.gl/rR2V8P
We hope you’ll join us in Minneapolis!
Cheers,
The OmniShopper Team
@OmniShopper

#OmniShopperEvent

Celebrate Valentine’s Day with $200 Off an Insights Conference You Love!

Dear
Insights Community,
Roses
are red’
Violets
are blue’
It’s
Valentine’s Day’
So
here’s $200 off a conference just for you!
As
valued reader of our blog, in true Valentine’s Day
fashion, we want to share the love! So please take your pick of our 2017
conference lineup and take $100 off using the blog discount code, plus an
additional $100 just for Valentine’s Day:
1)      Marketing Analytics & Data Science
Data science and
marketing analytics are transforming every industry. There is a reason why it
is being called the sexiest job of the 21st century. Calling all professionals
that want to harness analytics and data science! Do you realize how critical
you are to the future of your organization?
April 3-5, 2017
San Francisco, CA
Use code
MADS17BL for an additional $100 off
Buy tickets: https://goo.gl/mqkbYk
2)      TMRE in Focus
Take Command of
Technologies Shaping the Future of Market Research. TMRE in Focus helps you
understand how technology can be used, together, with your traditional MR
skills, to deliver better insights, faster to your customers.
May 1-3, 2017
Chicago, IL
Use code
FOCUS17BL for an additional $100 off
Buy tickets: https://goo.gl/7lPOK5 


3)      OmniShopper
At OmniShopper
brand & retail leaders reveal the latest insights and activation strategies
to Dominate at Retail. It’s time to throw out the traditional shopper
“rule book” out the window. Hear from those who’ve mastered
end-to-end omnichannel strategies to deliver seamless shopper experiences.
June 20-22, 2017
Minneapolis, MN
Use code
OMNI17BL for an additional $100 off
Buy tickets: https://goo.gl/zO6nd4
4)      TMRE: The Market Research Event
Insights is under
pressure. Pressure to reduce cost. Pressure to cut timelines. Pressure to not
only produce numbers, but a story that can be sold into the business. TMRE
helps you exploit insights as a vehicle for influence. The best in the industry
will converge to talk technology, disruptive trends, professional skill
development, hot new sectors, and the future customer.
October 22-25, 2017
Use code
TMRE17BL for an additional $100 off
Buy tickets: https://goo.gl/lp4c1z
Love,
The KNect365
Marketing, Insights & Innovation Team

Consumer Behavior, DIY, Omnichannel and Millennials

By: Keri Hodnik and
Liz Williams, Euromonitor International

This article was
originally published on Euromonitor
International
The Market Research Event, TMRE, is an annual conference
that seeks to unite both clients and vendors, positioning itself as the only
event in the world with twice as many client side participants than any other
industry event of its kind. This year, it was held in Boca Raton, Florida, and
covered a wide range of topics, including: People; Tools, Tech, and
Methodology; Innovation, Macro Trends; Customer; Omni-Shopper, B2B /
Health&Wellness; and Partnerships. TMRE hosts a broad array of speakers,
from CEOs of Fortune 500 Companies to Neuroscientists that seek to decode the
mind of the consumer.
The theme of the entire event was ‘Command the Boardroom’,
which focused on how to bring the eyes and ears of the consumer into the
boardroom itself. The presence of the Consumer Insights function is not only
needed to energise the boardroom on the importance of the ever changing
consumer, but it is crucial in representing the big ideas that drive business
growth.
With that theme setting the stage for the event, the
following four trends emerged from the speakers:
CONSUMER
BEHAVIOUR                                                                    
                 
Better understanding the inner workings of the consumer was
a common theme at this year’s TMRE Conference. Zoe Chance, Author of ‘Better
Influence’ and Assistant Professor of Marketing at Yale School of Management,
led a keynote on Mastering Influence & Persuasion.
Chance was driven to leave the world of corporate marketing
to understand behavioral economics after observing a repeating trend: companies
often put a lot of time, money and energy into using data for business
decisions, but in the end, would use their guts anyway. Why is that?
Chance went on to explain the difference between System 1
and System 2 decision making. These are better known as the unconscious and
conscious mind, or as she called them: ‘Alligator Brain’ and ‘The Court’. The
unconscious mind is fast, it’s intuitive and it’s automatic. On the other hand,
the conscious mind is slow, deliberate and effortful. Most of us believe that
we’re making decisions with The Court, but Alligator Brain kicks in far more
often than we care to realise.
Rather than trying to ineffectively engage consumers’
conscious mind, Chance suggests that instead we should be working to peak the
Alligator Brain with her 5 key forces of influence:
  • Labelling: giving a name to the behaviour that you wish to
    encourage or discourage.
  • Ease: ‘Alligators are lazy’; companies like Uber, Tinder and
    Amazon are great examples of how to make it as easy as possible for consumers
    to take action.
  • Attention: creating open loops, or Moments of Truth (as
    coined by P&G), both stimulate curiosity since we as consumers have an
    insatiable want to close the loop.
  • Scarcity: loss aversion is a powerful motivator and can be
    roused by communications such as limited time, limited quantity and
    exclusivity.
  • ‘Hot Potato’: when forced with resistance, give it back as a
    problem to solve. If someone says they’re not interested, instead try asking:
    ‘You’re not interested’? as a way to promote deliberate decision making.

The subject of the conscious versus unconscious mind was
revisited again by David Eagleman: Neuroscientist, Author of ‘Incognito: the
Secret Lives of the Brain’ and Host of PBS’ ‘The Brain with David Eagleman’.
In his talk on ‘Emotion, Motivation, and Reputation’, he
explained that there is an enormous gap between what your brain is doing and
what your conscious mind is actually thinking. ‘Everything about your cognition
is happening incognito,’ Eagleman said. The implication of the unconscious
brain being the core driver of decision making is that asking consumers
questions about their decision making process is irrelevant.
Neuroscience can tell us a lot about the driving forces
behind the consumer path to purchase. Eagleman explained that there are three
networks in the brain: one for price point, one for pleasure and one for how
the decision itself is viewed:
  • Valuation: everything is judged in context. Saving $10 on a
    pair of headphones has a higher consumer response than saving $10 on an iPhone,
    despite the benefit being equal. We as consumers do not actually know what we
    want until we see it in context.
  • Emotion: despite our want to believe we are rational and
    unbiased, our actions prove otherwise. For instance, did you know that humans
    make harsher decisions if in a fowl smelling room?
  • Social: Eagleman explained that ‘people are wired to
    understand companies the same way they understand people. Breaches of trust
    travel fast and are un-erasable.’

DO-IT-YOURSELF RESEARCH
DIY Research was a key theme for one of the tracks at the
event, focusing on how and when to ‘be scrappy’ with research. DIY research is
a cost effective alternative to outsourcing solutions that allows you to
analyse research results in real time. As Andrea Stokes, the Senior Director of
Consumer Insights at Marriott International, said in her session titled, ‘Cheap
and Cheerful DIY Research’, it’s important to know when it makes sense to
pursue DIY research and also when it makes sense not to:
5 reasons to go DIY:
1.      
When you need it fast
2.      
When you have an easily accessible customer
database
3.      
When the question is not a $20,000+ question
4.      
When a question can be answered by consumer
feedback alone, meaning that advanced analytics and modelling are not required
5.      
When you have only 60 minutes of your
stakeholders’ time
5 reasons not to go DIY:
1.      
When the ask is complex
2.      
When more than one translation is needed
3.      
When data will help to defend or prevent a large
investment
4.      
When the CEO needs to make a business case to
the Board of Directors
5.      
When research is needed for crisis management
Some of the tools that Stokes suggests to aid in DIY
research are software, such as survey software and an insight community
platform through which to conduct your research. Mobile devices like iPads and
smartphones make data collection fast and easy, while tools such as excel or
other data visualization programs like Tableau are essential for storytelling.
Last, all that is needed is you (and maybe a videographer to capture the
process).
MILLENNIALS AND THE
FUTURE OF RETAIL

Any Channel, Anytime, Anywhere: Today’s consumer is very
busy with little downtime, always on the go, always carrying their phones and
always connected to the internet. Consumers are looking for a more convenient
and seamless way to shop given their busy lifestyles. Many businesses realize
this and are changing to fit consumer’s needs by providing seamless easier ways
to shop. Several examples include:
??        
Sephora Flash ‘ Sephora’s new stores that allow
consumers to purchase an item online or through the app and pick up in store
the following days
??        
Charity Wait ‘ an app that allows consumers to
donate to a charity in order to skip a line at their favourite restaurant
??        
Shyp ‘ an app that allows consumers to ship out
postal packages without having to visit the USPS store. The consumer arranges a
time for pick-up and Shyp will pick up the box and send it to the nearby post
office.
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Task Rabbit ‘ an app that offers a personal
assistant to complete your tasks that you have to do throughout the day, making
your day more efficient
Customized Products: Even though consumers are on the go,
they are still making specific decisions on what they are purchasing. Consumers
are looking for more personalisation and customisation in their lives and they
want it to be easy.
Ugg has made it easier for consumers to try on shoes by
providing them with an interactive floor mat that allows them to picture what
the shoe would look like on
Break Free of Demographics: Consumers want to break free of
demographics. They are looking for more of a new wholesome look which basically
means retailers should start positioning products as being non-gender.
OMNICHANNEL

Many large tech gurus such as Facebook even have a difficult
time capturing all types of consumer market research data. Companies like
Facebook capture any shopper data on mobile phones and desk top data but are
not able to see what is happening outside of their own space. Facebook
expresses that it is important to capture all channels of shopper insights to
understand the full data set for the ever changing consumer.
Facebook has found that through their internal data numbers,
consumers tend to have a purchasing pattern per omnichannel. Many consumer turn
to mobile to shop for categories that are less expensive, perhaps because it
doesn’t take much thought or commitment to purchase these items that might be
used every day. However, consumers tend to turn to their desktop for categories
that are more expensive which may be due to internet connection worry or being
able to see the product on a larger screen.

What Facebook is unaware of through internal data is
in-store shopping habits. This type of data may help companies like Facebook
understand what brand elements trigger market behaviour, what is going to drive
consumers to make purchases in store, what the importance of labels play when
shopping in different channels and how can they measure behaviour of a shopper
on each channel.