Tag Archives: Nike

World Cup Advertising Wars, Part 2: How to Boost Your Campaigns

Editor’s Note: This
blog post is brought to you by Mattr, a
company that is leading a new era for consumer insights, providing brands with
a deeper, more colorful view into their social audience. Through a unique mix
of personality data and demographics, Marketers can begin to discover what
really makes their audience tick.

Rewind 4 years, and you might recall Adidas and Nike as the
top Marketing contenders for World Cup gear, with Adidas as an official
sponsor, and Nike as their ambush Marketing competitor. Both brands were
extremely successful with their campaigns, partly because the 2010 World Cup
events showed the highest numbers for a sporting event ever on social, providing a great way to increase engagement
amongst soccer fans.
Fast forward to 2014, and not a lot has changed in the
battle of the boots and jerseys. Adidas has again claimed a spot as an official
sponsor, with Nike looming in the background ready to pounce. In fact, Nike
wasted no time, and was the first brand to launch a World Cup
spot
 this year with the inspirational theme ‘Risk Everything’.
And Adidas should take note of Nike’s presence, especially
since Nike brought the pressure last year when Adidas sales slumped in Western Europe. Truth be told, it’s
anyone’s game when it comes to which brand will come out on top after this
year’s World Cup.
Segmentation- From
Planning to Launching

Elaborating on last week’s post, we plan to reveal some
Marketing tactics that might help each of these brands (and smaller brands)
gain the World Cup Marketing advantage, by moving away from the campaign
‘Planning’ phase and into the ‘Active’ phase.

To start, let’s look at the changes in the @FIFAWorldCup
Personas. Last week, the most engaged Persona was ‘Wholesome Males’. Another
sample of tweets this week reveals that ‘Reliable Males’ are now just as
engaged as ‘Wholesome Males’.
So how can brands use this information? Let’s start with
Adidas. They’ve hit social hard for their last few soccer-themed campaigns,
introducing several hashtags (including #FastOrFail for their AdiZero f50 boot,
and #GetReady for their Body Care line). A very smart move on their part.
Now it might also be smart for them to use real-time
segmentation to ‘boost’ any online campaigns running concurrently with their TV
spots. This week, that means speaking to the ‘Wholesome’ and ‘Reliable’
Personas that are actively engaged with @FIFAWorldCup and soccer.
Campaign Content
Shouldn’t Stay Static

Maybe that entails creating some fresh, new content (social,
online advertising, etc) that these Personas can relate to better, because as
mentioned last week, personality types unconsciously ‘Respond To’ or ‘Get
Turned Off’ by certain language. The newly engaged ‘Reliable Male’ Persona
break-down is below:
Popular Hashtags Lead
Back to You

Another way to boost their campaigns might be to use the
favorite hashtags from both Personas, to encourage engagement with the Adidas
campaigns. The current ‘Reliable Male’ favorite hashtag list is below (and what
do you know, #Adidas made the cut). Using these hashtags in addition to the
unique campaign hashtags might bring in more eyeballs from the online soccer
audience who Adidas is looking to sell to.
Next week we’ll look at the @FIFAWorldCup top shared media
and interests, and discuss how Marketers can use that data to make unique media
placement and brand influencer decisions.
Want to look at your own brand audience’s personality
breakdown or favorite hashtags? Click here.
Mattr is a sponsor of
The Future of Consumer Intelligence 2014
taking place next week in Los Angeles, CA. This year, FOCI explores the
emerging role of decision science and the convergence of knowledge points -
insights, foresights, social science, marketing science and intelligence with
technology as a central driving force and profound connector.

As a reader of our
blog, you get an exclusive 15% discount on your FOCI 2014 pass. Use
code FOCI14BLOG when you register: http://bit.ly/RRvQzl

The American Cancer Society’s Kimberly Cason On the Future of Research

I recently sat down with The Future of Consumer Intelligence 2014 speaker Kimberly Cason, Senior Consultant, Marketing Research, American Cancer Society, Inc. We are fortunate to have her share her critical insight with our FOCI community before the event kicks off in two weeks. This year, FOCI explores the emerging role of decision science and the convergence of knowledge points – insights, foresights, social science, marketing science and intelligence with technology as a central driving force and profound connector.
We are barraged by information – and within this sea of data we must remember to think of the problem we are trying to solve and how we can we use this convergence of information to better understand people.  Translating the new “understanding” into future opportunities means that the role of a researcher is changing. FOCI accelerates disruptive innovators in the research space and pushes people to take risks, to think outside of traditional research methods and insights gathering and explore new and alternative tools and technologies. FOCI will bridge the gap between what people say they are going to do and what they actually do.
Here is what Cason had to say:
IIR: A big theme of this year’s conference is ‘humanization of data.’ Why do you think understanding PEOPLE (not consumers) presents an opportunity for strategic action?
Cason: Marketing has moved to a custom-level. When you walk into the Nike store, you get greeted by name and they know how many steps you’ve taken that day (if you are a user of their gear).  We have to move with it or risk putting ourselves into extension by not providing relevant insights.
IIR: How is technology not only changing how we do things, but also how we understand the world, business, and people?
Cason: Technology is so engrained in our lifestyles that not only our purchasing behavior is deeply impacted by it, but also our personal lives ‘ how we communicate with family and friends, even.  How we integrate (or choose not to integrate) technology into our lives defines us internally and externally, shaping our own personal brands.  Even where we choose to engage defines us. 
IIR: How has the role of ‘the researcher’ changed?
Cason: There is an entirely new set of skills required to manage the holistic picture.  I’ve become versed in Google Analytics, for example.  There are entire semesters of information I’ve had to learn as the field evolves.  Social media wasn’t even on our radar when I was in grad school (in 2005).
IIR: Describe a situation where you’ve taken a risk or thought outside the box of tradition market research methods. How did that benefit your business?
Cason: I love the quasi qual/quant methodology that allows you to gather large amounts of qualitative data using survey tools.  (Hot Spot message testing, for example.)  These methods allow us to collect the data in one week compared to 6 if we used a traditional focus group recruiting and interview strategy.  Both have their advantages and disadvantages, of course, but these methods allow for a disaster check when time isn’t on your side.
IIR: Where do you see the emerging space of marketing science and role of data scientists in the next five years?
Cason: We have always been story tellers.  Now, we have to tell the story not only from the driver’s seat of the car we’re in, but within the context of the entire freeway ‘ all the other variables that come into play’is there traffic, what’s the weather like, are other drivers distracted, how reliable is the car, how far to the next exit, etc.?  It’s no longer useful to bring one methodology to the table when presenting the whys behind our results.  We have to look at all the influential factors and determine which are relevant.
IIR: How has the increasingly connected consumer affected market research?
Cason: It’s a huge opportunity for us!  Those that can turn down the noise and find the nuggets of meaningful data will go far.
Want to hear more from Kimberly in person? Join her at Future of Consumer Intelligence 2014 in Los Angeles, CA in a few weeks. She will be presenting in a session entitled, ‘Award-Winning, Top-Tier Research on a Budget!’ 
** As a reader of our blog, you get an exclusive 15% discount on your FOCI 2014 pass. Use code FOCI14BLOG when you register: http://bit.ly/1mvqyD0**
About the Author: Amanda Ciccatelli, Social Media Strategist of the Marketing Division at IIR USA, has a background in digital and print journalism, covering a variety of topics in business strategy, marketing, and technology. Amanda is the Editor at Large for several of IIR’s blogs including Next Big DesignCustomers 1st, and ProjectWorld and World Congress for Business Analysts, and a regular contributor to Front End of Innovation and The Market Research Event,. She previously worked at Technology Marketing Corporation as a Web Editor where she covered breaking news and feature stories in the technology industry. She can be reached at aciccatelli@iirusa.com. Follow her at @AmandaCicc.

Speaker Spotlight: Kimberly Cason

I recently sat down with The
Future of Consumer Intelligence 2014 
speaker Kimberly Cason, Senior Consultant,
Marketing Research, American Cancer Society, Inc. We are fortunate to have her
share her critical insight with our FOCI community before the event kicks
off in two weeks. This year, FOCI explores the emerging role of decision
science and the convergence of knowledge points – insights, foresights, social
science, marketing science and intelligence with technology as a central
driving force and profound connector.
We are barraged by information – and within this sea of data
we must remember to think of the problem we are trying to solve and how we can
we use this convergence of information to better understand people.
 Translating the new “understanding” into future opportunities
means that the role of a researcher is changing. FOCI accelerates disruptive
innovators in the research space and pushes people to take risks, to think
outside of traditional research methods and insights gathering and explore new
and alternative tools and technologies. FOCI will bridge the gap between what
people say they are going to do and what they actually do.
Here is what Cason had to say:
IIR: A big theme
of this year’s conference is ‘humanization of data.’ Why do you think
understanding PEOPLE (not consumers) presents an opportunity for strategic
action?
Cason: Marketing
has moved to a custom-level. When you walk into the Nike store, you get greeted
by name and they know how many steps you’ve taken that day (if you are a user
of their gear).  We have to move with it or risk putting ourselves into
extension by not providing relevant insights.
IIR: How is
technology not only changing how we do things, but also how we understand the
world, business, and people?
Cason: Technology
is so engrained in our lifestyles that not only our purchasing behavior is
deeply impacted by it, but also our personal lives ‘ how we communicate with
family and friends, even.  How we integrate (or choose not to integrate)
technology into our lives defines us internally and externally, shaping our own
personal brands.  Even where we choose to engage defines us. 
IIR: How has the
role of ‘the researcher’ changed?
Cason: There is
an entirely new set of skills required to manage the holistic picture. 
I’ve become versed in Google Analytics, for example.  There are entire
semesters of information I’ve had to learn as the field evolves.  Social
media wasn’t even on our radar when I was in grad school (in 2005).
IIR: Describe a
situation where you’ve taken a risk or thought outside the box of tradition
market research methods. How did that benefit your business?
Cason: I love the
quasi qual/quant methodology that allows you to gather large amounts of
qualitative data using survey tools.  (Hot Spot message testing, for
example.)  These methods allow us to collect the data in one week compared
to 6 if we used a traditional focus group recruiting and interview
strategy.  Both have their advantages and disadvantages, of course, but
these methods allow for a disaster check when time isn’t on your side.
IIR: Where do you
see the emerging space of marketing science and role of data scientists in the
next five years?
Cason: We have
always been story tellers.  Now, we have to tell the story not only from
the driver’s seat of the car we’re in, but within the context of the entire
freeway ‘ all the other variables that come into play’is there traffic, what’s
the weather like, are other drivers distracted, how reliable is the car, how
far to the next exit, etc.?  It’s no longer useful to bring one
methodology to the table when presenting the whys behind our results.  We
have to look at all the influential factors and determine which are relevant.
IIR: How has the
increasingly connected consumer affected market research?
Cason: It’s a
huge opportunity for us!  Those that can turn down the noise and find the
nuggets of meaningful data will go far.
Want to hear more from Kimberly in person? Join her
at Future of Consumer Intelligence 2014 in Los Angeles, CA in a few
weeks. She will be presenting in a session entitled, ‘Award-Winning,
Top-Tier Research on a Budget!’
 
** As a reader of our
blog, you get an exclusive 15% discount on your FOCI 2014 pass. Use code FOCI14BLOG when
you register: http://bit.ly/1mvqyD0**

About the Author:
Amanda Ciccatelli, Social Media Strategist of the Marketing Division at IIR USA, has a background in digital and
print journalism, covering a variety of topics in business strategy, marketing,
and technology. Amanda is the Editor at Large for several of IIR’s blogs
including Next Big DesignCustomers 1st, and ProjectWorld and World Congress for Business
Analysts
, and a regular contributor to Front End of Innovation and The Market Research Event,.
She previously worked at Technology Marketing Corporation as a Web Editor where
she covered breaking news and feature stories in the technology industry. She
can be reached at aciccatelli@iirusa.com. Follow her at @AmandaCicc.

Live from #TMRE13 Keynote: The Pragmatic Brain

Stereotyping is a natural human tendency. Brands are stereotypes. When you think of Disney, what comes to mind? Nike? BMW?

Brand stereotypes create reality. For example, Coors – cold activated cans, Rocky Mountains in the background, frosted bottles. You’ve seen all the commercials. They create the idea in your mind that Coors’ beer is actually colder and more refreshing than other brands. They are tapping into your unconscious and making you believe it.

Stereotypes resist change, but CAN change. In research studies, most people won’t change their minds, even after contact itself. Those ideas are so deeply embedded in their minds, that actual proof which negates it, doesn’t affect them. However, a few of those who came in contact, actually did change. In order to change your brand’s stereotype, you must first make small, significant changes to tap into your consumer’s unconscious.
The interactions must feel cooperative. If consumers feel you have the same ideals/goals they do, you will see positive change. For example – Guiness. Not a beer you normally associate with sports. If you saw a commercial of a bunch of guys sitting around watching sports, eating chips and drinking Guiness, nobody would believe it. In this commercial, they associate themselves with loyalty, friendship and having the same values you do, which sets the context for their desired change.

You must drive change with the right type of contact – it must feel authentic. Stereotypes are part of who we are. Find out how people see themselves and how they see your brand. You will then be able to align the two and position your brand the way YOU want people to see it. 
Bottom line for market research professionals. Think of your brand as a stereotype and strive to understand the full stereotype. Then you will be able to affect change.

Talia Short is Chief Wrangler at April Bell Research Group, a boutique, full-service marketing research firm, committed to delivering fresh insights you can act on! Learn more at aprilbellresearch.com.

Research Pays ‘ An International View

Today’s post comes from Tim Hoskins, VP of Client Relations at Quester. Quester is a sponsor at The Market Research Technology Event 2012. Quester?? has over 30 years of experience in uncovering the qualitative insights that are necessary to make businesses successful.  If you’d like to join them this April 30-May 2, 2012, in Las Vegas, NV, register today and mention code MRTECH12BLOG and save 15% off the standard rate!

Research Pays ‘ An International View

Source: Logo Resources

It is very likely that Nike will soon recover from their latest sneaker name. In short time you will have to actually search long and hard for the articles and blog posts on the internet. For the time being though, it has become the topic of conversation with others bringing up reminders of other companies who have had the same misfortune (read about the Black and Tan here). We will probably never know how the oversight occurred and personally, I think it may be best if we don’t.

What we can derive from this is that due diligence and research will always pay off in the long run. With the emergence of online qualitative software tools, interviews with your consumers can take place with a click of a button, even though you may be separated by an ocean.

In a study we conducted at Quester, we focused on conducting qualitative discussions with respondents in their natural language in the following countries; United States, Canada, Mexico, Germany and France. In total, 1226 respondents were interviewed around the topic of bottled water and the role that it plays in their lives. The average data collection time period was around one week per country.

For more details on how the interviews were administered, and the cultural nuances of each country, please feel free to download the paper here, or watch/listen to the presentation here.