Tag Archives: news

How does viral content spread via social networks?

Every group of social media marketers I speak to point to the most difficult part of their job:  to consistently produce good content.  
They get their content from:
  • Agencies, 
  • From subject matters from throughout their organizations 
  • They rely on listening tools to discover and amplify mentions of their brands.

Another common theme is the quest for the holy grail of posted content:  A viral posting.  Well scientists are trying to find out what’s in the secret sauce; whether a viral posting can be predicted.
 
Comparing How Many Initial Same Posts
Two Types of Viral Content
A posted photo doesn’t have to be posted by a very popular page in order to trigger a large cascade.  It can be an Average Joe with a compelling story or message.  
The research points to two different types of postings that proved viral worthy: 
1.  A posting by someone famous (think Ellen DeGeneres at the Oscars) or 
2.  a posting from a less famous source that found appeal for other reasons. 
How Viral Content Spreads
These viral cascades typically start fast; early reproduction speed, the initial velocity across the network, seems to be a key marker. Further, as the photo spreads, it begins to matter less who spread it originally, and the actual kind of content matters less.  One thing about pictures though, captions do seem to be important.
The Odds Are Against You
You can try to post something that goes viral, but the odds are against you.  In studies, one of out every 3,000 links produced a ‘large event,’ or a sharing phenomenon that reached at least a 100 additional persons. But truly viral events with multiple generations of sharing occur only about once in a million instances.
Postings that start from a very popular source (again think about Ellen DeGeneres or The President with David Ortiz) start with an initial big spurt and then fall off.  On the other hand a viral posting with more modest beginnings (one of those ‘Please repost this to prove to my girlfriend how much I love her’ or ‘If we get a million shares this young girl will get her medicine’) demonstrates smaller & consistent growth over time.
 
Viral Path Patterns
Who Is Doing All This Sharing?  
Well you can guess some obvious things.  A picture of Mrs. Obama doing a good deed will get more shares from women and liberals.  A picture of a couple with a guy asking sharers to support his commitment to his girlfriend will get more shares from males. 
Well Connected Followers
Still the viral likelihood of the share depends on the importance of well-connected followers.  Or in some cases if there are outside factors like having the news media acknowledge the phenomenon.  Some of the hottest shares were successfully driven primarily by word-of-mouth adoption.  They had to rely on Word of Mouth, in part because those that created them did not initially have large advertising budgets, and in part because, by design, they contained features to explicitly encourage sharing.
So do we know how to produce viral content? Not yet, but we do know how some viral content became viral.
The structural virality of online diffusion,  Goel,  Anderson, et al,  Stanford University
The Anatomy of Large Facebook Cascades, Alex Dow , Facebook Data Science
Ron Shulkin blogs researches and writes about enterprise technology focused on innovation and social media. You can follow him Twitter. You can follow his blogs at this Facebook group.  You can connect with Ron on LinkedIn.  
Ron Shulkin is the Chicago area Director for Spredfast. Spredfast provides a social relationship platform that allows organizations to manage, monitor, and measure their social media programs at scale. Spredfast enables more people, in more places, to engage in more conversations from a single platform on supported social networks like Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Google+ YouTube and popular blogging platforms. You can learn more about Spredfast here.

What’s the bigger social media threat: verification or platform overload?

Evolving is the bettering or worsening of a sturdy phenomenon. Change is
a more radical spin on the very same. But when it comes to social media
habits, it is tricky to discern what is evolutionary and what is truly
changing. Two elements that pose a risk to using social media for marketing are verification, and a simple overwhelm, particularly of visual platforms. Two trends highlighted further in Social Media Habits of 2014.

Ever had a tweet favorite or retweeted almost simultaneously after
posting? Or are you guilty of scrolling and liking or disliking? While
it may be the signs of an obsessive compulsive behavior, it becomes even
more risky in the world of big data. When emergencies happen, or
misquotes are leaked, or media puts forth information that is not
verified, the habit can become a risky one. Things like events in Boston give rise to the speed vs accuracy paradox, as do weather related calamities
like the Polar Vortex or Sandy. The key is to always ensure to verify
before sharing, before misinformation leads to virality. But is this
even possible in a me-first world?
social media @sssourabh

Similarly, ever noticed how Facebook, Instagram, Pinterest, Tumblr or Snapchat
are all driven by a vicarious sharing of images (and off late, videos)?
Sometimes even the same ones’ with some apps making it easy to cross
share. Besides a sense of overwhelm, there is also a notion of d??j?? vu.
Social media is meant to be current, but is getting muddled with the
user equivalent of recycling and content marketing. And some of these
platforms are aping one another, like direct messaging on Instagram as a war to snapchat.
Video was born to Vine, and is now popular with Instagram and
Flipagram, alike. One of these photo platforms will surely tumble under
the mounting pressure to distinguish and differentiate. Is another
MySpace coming our way? Until then, anticipate more scrolling and
observing, until there is simply less time spent on certain platforms
before the final crash.

Sourabh Sharma,
Communication & Social Media Research Expert at SKIM, an international
consultancy and marketing research agency, has a background in engineering,
marketing and finance from the University of Pennsylvania, and the Wharton
School and Rotterdam School of Management. Having worked in marketing and
product development at L’Oreal, followed by a stint in management consulting,
he now passionately enjoys the world of social media, and can be found on every
platform with his alias sssourabh. He is a food critic and a fashion writer,
and documents these alongside strategy on his blog called
3FS. He may be reached at s.sharma@skimgroup.com.
Follow him on
@sssourabh.

Is your marketing calendar chaotic? Take this one question test.

Wrestling social media to the ground
Every social media manager I talk to tells me one of two things.  One, they are relying on technology to get their mission accomplished.  Or Two, their collaborative process involves spreadsheets, word documents, emails and contentious moments deciding who on the team is going to react to a rogue social post mention.
Well kudos to those with technology, I just want to point out the advantages social relationship management software brings to the table.

Marketing Calendars Have Many Cooks
Think about your organization.  

Here’s the one test question:  Is your agency assembling content, putting it into a spreadsheet or word doc and then sending it off for approval? 

Then does the process involve approvals from:
  • legal,
  • the brand managers,
  • the community managers,
  • Corporate Communications,
  • Public Relations,
  • Marketing,
  • (I don’t know’anyone else?  HR?)?

I suggest you do two things if this is true.  One calculate the amount of expensive labor expended.  And Two, think about how much important information can be lost in that shuffle.

Synergy Not Chaos
The alternative of course is to have a single view into the content so as to support a true team collaborative process.  Think about what life would be like if the team could log into the same dashboard, (each with their own security limitations of course). 
  1. The agency can upload the content. 
  2. The content can be routed via workflows to each approver automatically; alerting each of them it’s their turn. 
  3. This single view of content can be scheduled, pushed, published and then monitored. 
  4. Rinse Repeat

Chaos Squared
For those organizations with global reach, or many departments, stores, etc. you probably have many Facebook pages, Twitter handles, Instagram accounts.  Think about how the process to distribute approved content could be streamlined, curated with confidence and pushed out there if, again, your teammates were alerted by email to look into that single view dashboard.
The platform will also improve productivity by enabling your team to push out communications across multiple pages, multiple social networks at the same time.  Again, count the hours and do the math.
With a social relationship management system, the team at the hub can have confidence those folks on the tips of the spokes will be publishing What you want and in a Timely Basis.
Plus you’ll have confidence that all of your messaging will have a consistent Voice.  Even if those messages are in multiple languages. 
Measuring Performance
For those responsible for monitoring the content’s performance consider merely logging in to view the metrics, to eyeball what’s working instantly. This versus the monthly reports gathered by perusing multiple metric sources.  We all want to know ‘what’s working’ and waiting is never easy.  With the technology monitoring your content’s performance you can specify time periods, social voices, channels, accounts in varied slicing and dicing fashion.
Wrap Up
So if you’re assigning tasks to others and want to monitor their workflow,
Technology shouldn’t rule the roost, but it can be the backbone that supports the creative energy of the smart people on your team.  If team collaboration excellence is your goal, then using a social relationship management set of technologies to manage your marketing calendar is absolutely the best practice.
Ron Shulkin blogs researches and writes about enterprise technology focused on innovation and social media. You can follow him Twitter. You can follow his blogs at this Facebook group.  You can connect with Ron on LinkedIn.  
Ron Shulkin is the Chicago area Director for Spredfast. Spredfast provides a social relationship platform that allows organizations to manage, monitor, and measure their social media programs at scale. Spredfast enables more people, in more places, to engage in more conversations from a single platform on supported social networks like Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Google+ YouTube and popular blogging platforms. You can learn more about Spredfast here.

Is Instagram the next challenge for brand marketers?

I talk to social marketers every day.  And here’s a consistent message I hear:  ‘Yes we work with Facebook and Twitter’.  Or they might throw in Google+ or YouTube. 
But almost uniformly I hear, ‘and this year we’re going to try and introduce Instagram into the mix’. 
What’s happening out there in the social arena that image oriented social networks are getting this type of attention?  Is it the pictures?  Or because these networks are newer and younger audiences are seemingly migrating to Instagram and Pinterest? 
Is it just the visual nature of the medium presenting itself as a challenge worth pursuing (as well as worth a thousand words)?
 
Images Count
We know images are important.  The first things most people look at when they see a profile on Facebook or Google+ or LinkedIn is the profile picture.
Facebook is making it clear that brand postings need to be more content rich in the future.  No more posting just text’ a link or an image must be associated with the post if there’s going to be a chance it will show up in someone’s newsfeed.
Most social users are drawn to images both to look at and to share. 
Some Statistics
In fact studies have shown photo uploads are the most popular activity on both Facebook and on Google+.  Posting photos is the number one activity on Facebook whether you’re logging in from your computer, your tablet or your phone.
This visual web is driving the rise of Pinterest with a growth rate of 88% over the last 12 months.  Instagram is the fastest growing social network with 150 million users and 40 million photos being uploaded each day .
How Do We Collect Information From Images?
All these photos can represent a data mining challenge.  It is much easier to perform data analysis on text.  Only if the photos have text associated with them can the images be counted, categorized and accorded value. 
But the good news is that users are using hashtags with the images. Hashtags are widely used by brands. 83% of posts submitted by brands include a hashtag, and almost all of the brands now use them.
So analysis might be fruitful and fuel marketing decisions.  For instance, it may be possible to generate keywords from images people have posted and use those keywords to direct relevant advertisements to that individual, in much the same way sponsored search now does with text queries.
Eric Xing, a professor at Carnegie Mellon University, looked at images associated with 48 brands in four categories’sports, luxury, beer, and fast food. The images came from popular photo-sharing sites such as Pinterest.  He was able to produce cogent statistics based on the images.
Pictures Are Powerful
And images can reach consumers in ways text just can’t.  You can participate in social media with understandable images without putting out very much mental effort.  In fact you don’t even have to read.  The illiterate can easily communicate on social networks by enjoying images, liking them (by clicking on that thumbs up image) and sharing them (by clicking on an arrow).
A study done at the Marriott School of Management at Brigham Young University showed that over-exposure to food imagery increased people’s satiation. (Satiation was defined as the drop in enjoyment with repeated consumption, or the fifth bite of cake was less enjoyable than the first.) 

Best Practices
And leaders in social media communication, such as Target, are creatively using image oriented social networks to engage their audience.   Items in a Target store might have a tag that says, ‘As seen on Pinterest.’ And you can browse the latest Pinterest postings at the Target web site.
Wrap Up
We know social networks constantly evolve, and the tastes and interests of users evolve right alongside.  It makes sense that brand marketers are planning to evolve their approach to engage with their consumers. And that means many are going to follow through on that promise and start using Instagram this year.

Ron Shulkin blogs researches and writes about enterprise technology focused on innovation and social media. You can follow him Twitter. You can follow his blogs at this Facebook group.  You can connect with Ron on LinkedIn.  
Ron Shulkin is the Chicago area Director for Spredfast.  Spredfast provides a social relationship platform that allows organizations to manage, monitor, and measure their social media programs at scale. Spredfast enables more people, in more places, to engage in more conversations from a single platform on supported social networks like Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Google+ YouTube and popular blogging platforms.  You can learn more about Spredfast here.

Live from #MediaInsight: Social@Large: Will Tracking, Analyzing and Surveying Lead to Social Monetization?

photo: Wikipedia

Nathalie Bordes, Senior Director Sports & Emerging Platforms Research, ESPN, told us today that Sports is Social. Nothing drives social  TV conversations like sports.

In 2013, social conversations around TV sports grew 37%. At ESPN they had 800 social media personas to maintain.

ESPN Social Media Stakeholders

Research &Analytics, Brand, Product and Ad Sales teams all needed a seat at the social media round-table:

  • Track, monitor, examine
    • total social footprint
    • by account
    • share of voice
  • Analyze traffic across 
  • asess which metrics are relevant
  • Historical data as well as real-time for each account
Solution Needs
  • Track and store data, competitive posts
  • Allows “real-time” analytics across media platforms
  • Has custom and automated reporting capabilties for custom, monthly, daily, hourly intervals
Social Reporting Platform Pilots

Can this solution digest, store, and analyze social “raw” data for one or multiple platforms?

  • Provide a consistent data stream?
  • historical data dumps
  • recreate exisiting reports in an efficient way?

Started off with Twitter and Facebook using data resellers GNIP and Datasift, storage in Hadoop, then platfora visualized the data.

The vendors collect, filter and enrich the social data streams: FB public API for 30 pages and 1,200 Twitter handles.

Resources:
IT infrastructure and personnel
legal and procurement support
funding

Challenges for ESPN:

Data:

  • social media platform restrictions
  • data outages
  • data inconsistencies
  • historical data structure

Reporting:

  • Lack of metric definitions
  • data verification
Pilot data collected:

71 Million tweets
2.2 Million Facebook Posts

Retweets show share of voice – how relevantly you are communicating with your fans.

Monetization comes from driving social fans to your website, to your product.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Valerie RussoFormerly a senior copy editor at Thomson Reuters, a research editor at AOL,  and a senior web publicist at Hachette Book GroupValerie M. Russo is editor at large of The Front End of Innovation BlogThe Market Research Event BlogThe World Future Trends Tumblr, the Digital Impact Blog, and also blogs at Literanista.net. She is the innovation lead and senior social media strategist for the Marketing and Business Strategy Division of the Institute for International Research, an Informa LLC., and her poetry was published in Regrets Only on sale at the MOMA Gift Shop. Her background is in Anthropology and English Literature. You can reach her at vrusso@iirusa.com or @Literanista.

Live from #MediaInsight: David Poltrack’s C7 monetization strategy

Met up with David Poltrack to hear more about his C7 monetization strategy.  While advertisers don’t want to shift from C3 to C7, we now live in a VOD world.  Networks pull ads after 3 days with VOD, and this causes advertisers to miss out on a large and upscale audience.  With a C7 strategy, advertisers could be more dynamic.  If they were to buy 7 days of advertising, they could use different executions on different days to keep from becoming stale – and potentially increase impact far beyond what is currently the case with the C3 structure.  

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Ben Proctor is Insights Strategist at Miner & Co. Studio, a New York-based consultancy

A Day in the Life’

Today’s post comes from TMRE Guest Blogger, Katie Clark. She is also known as @InsightsGal on Twitter and is a client-side market researcher, project manager, and social media maven.  

I would venture a guess that most of you are at least peripherally familiar with ‘Day in the Life of a Customer’ (DITLOC) studies.  If your customers are looking for a deep-dive into their customers’ lives, looking for new product opportunities, better knowledge about how their products or services are being used, or simply wanting to learn more about their customer base, a DITLOC study could be the way to go. 

However, what I’ve found interesting lately is when I mention ‘day in the life’ studies in my conversations with other researchers, what comes up more often than DITLOC studies with customers is the desire to hear more about the day in the life (and/or the productivity and workflow tips) of a researcher

Why? If you’re a corporate researcher like I am, it’s always fascinating to get out of your bubble and hear how other corporate researchers are faring within their companies. Are there better ways to do things? Ways to gain efficiencies? Inspiration to be had? 

One of benefits of attending TMRE is to meet your peers. In my case that’s client-side researchers in small-to-medium size organizations. It’s a chance to commiserate and accomplish the above – to do some brain picking as to each other’s processes in the hopes we can find some efficiencies to bring back to our offices and teams. 

Sessions at #TMRE13 that focused on the stories, processes, and triumphs of corporate researchers such as Marisa Paruch of Wolverine Worldwide and Susan Topel of Centene were fantastic for corporate researchers like me – to give us a “day in the life” per se.  

Outside of attending TMRE there are some but not many resources that cover this for researchers.  There are a few videos out there that cover this such as this overview of Steve Murphy’s day as Managing Director at Ipsos, and this oldie but goodie about the day in the life of a Research Analyst. Are there some great researcher day-in-the-life resources that I’m missing? 

Outside of research, there are great ongoing profile series such as Inc.‘s The Way I Work and Lifehacker’s This Is How I Work.  

Is this a topic that resonates with you? Are you interested in how different researchers work? What questions would you want to know, and who would you like to hear from?  

If so, let me know in the comments below if this is a feature you’d be interested in reading, I’m happy to do some interviewing.
_______________

More about Katie: Based in Portland, Maine, Katie is the Senior Research Manager at Diversified Business Communications, managing a team of skilled researchers busy gleaning insights for products around the globe. She has worked with companies large and small in industries such as software, seafood, fragrance and entertainment to help companies move their business forward supported by actionable insights derived from market research. She loves to find the story in the numbers and is passionate about bringing the ‘Voice of the Customer’ inside the organization. Active on social media as @InsightsGal, Katie actively tweets and blogs about the market research industry. The opinions expressed here are her own and not those of her employer.

Where you’re from influences what you say!

Where people are from makes a difference’and likely skews their contributions to collaborative or VOC  systems.

A couple of years ago someone asked me if I was from New York.  The fact is I’m from Chicago but I think I understood what they were saying’I speak like I know what I’m talking about; I know what I want’and probably I intimate that I’d like it right now (please).  

The fact is when you ask your customers what they think their responses may be skewed in tone depending on where they’re from.  Let’s remember voice of the customer response collection systems’in fact any collaborative technology, is still a form of social network and the interactions occurring there should be interpreted with a tempered understanding of the social backgrounds of the participants.

It doesn’t mean you shouldn’t believe them nor accept rudeness nor push for more than what you’re getting.

It just means you should at least consider where any given comment is ‘coming from’.

The USA reflects three different attitudes
For instance people from the US can be divided up into three regions with somewhat predictable responses. 

Those in the Midwest, Great Plains, and Deep South can be relied on to be ‘people who are, on average, conventional, friendly, sociable, compliant, and emotionally stable.’ Just like the voice of the newscaster, you can expect responses to questions to come through on an even keel.  ‘Gee Whiz!  Us folks from Chicago go to bed early!’

Those primarily from the Western portions of the country are ‘people who are, on average, creative and relaxed, reserved, and perhaps somewhat socially distant.’   Their responses can be expected to be leavened with a friendly frankness.  ‘No problemo, mi amigo!’


Lastly those folks from the Northeast can be counted on to be ‘people who are, on average, irritable, impulsive, and quarrelsome.’  So don’t be surprised when their frankness is less than friendly, it’s just their nature.  ‘Beep Beep’Move it!’

Extreme Weather can produce Rich Innovators!
I manage the idea management group on LinkedIn and a big chunk of the LinkedIn groups I belong to have something to do with Innovation.  So together with my work (which is international in scope frequently) I get to talk to people interested in Innovation from all over the world.  A couple of years ago I noticed a high percentage of innovative people coming from The Netherlands.

I was motivated to ask a couple of these folks why that was.  Predictably the answer I got was something on the order of ‘it’s cold here so we spend a lot of time in doors thinking, talking and drinking beer’.  I don’t think that’s quite it.

Studies do show those both affluent and from demanding climates (cold or hot) have the most freedom and opportunity.  Because of this they tend to be open minded and are comfortable seeking risks.  They’re creative thinkers who are happy to share their opinions.

Where you’re from makes a difference.
We all work to have a social media ‘voice’.  Sometimes the collaborative contributions we read in news feeds are affected by the geography of the contributor.  Don’t take offense at the tough guy from New York; don’t think the guy from California is slack; don’t be surprised to get a bunch of creative thought from wealthy people in either Denmark or Saudi Arabia.  Just like Real Estate, when it comes to the Voice of Your Customer the three top important attributes might just be location location location.

Rentfrow, P. et al., ‘Divided We Stand: Three Psychological Regions of the United States and Their Political, Economic, Social, and Health Correlates,’ Journal of Personality and Social Psychology (forthcoming).
Van de Vliert, E., ‘Climato-Economic Habitats Support Patterns of Human Needs, Stresses, and Freedoms,’ Behavioral and Brain Sciences (October 2013).
 

Ron Shulkin blogs, researches and writes about enterprise technology focused on social media, innovation, voice of the customer, marketing automation and enterprise feedback management.  You can learn more about Ron at his biography web site:www.shulkin.net. You can follow him Twitter. You can follow his blogs at this Facebook group.  You can connect with Ron on LinkedIn.   
Ron Shulkin is Vice President of the Americas for CogniStreamer??, an innovation ecosystem. CogniStreamer serves as a Knowledge Management System, Idea Management System and Social Network for Innovation. CogniStreamer has been rated as a ‘Leader’ in Forrester’s recent Wave report on Innovation Management Tools. You can learn more about CogniStreamer here http://bit.ly/ac3x60 . Ron also manages The Idea Management Group on LinkedIn (JoinHere).

Live from #TMRE13: Day 3 Recap ‘ Malcolm Gladwell, Insights into Action, and Becoming a Research Force to be Reckoned With

Today’s post comes from TMRE Guest Blogger, Katie Clark. She is also known as @InsightsGal on Twitter and is a client-side market researcher, project manager, and social media maven.  

We made it folks! The third and final day of #TMRE13 was a
great one, and by this time most of you are on planes, trains or in cars heading
back home. Consider this your travel reading.

The day kicked off with a truly Nashville-style surprise ‘ a
musical introduction by Tim McNary, lead singer of the band McNary. Our first
keynote session was an esteemed panel comprised of Timothy de Waal Malefyt from
the Center for Positive Marketing at Fordham University,
Kathleen Vohs from the Carlson School of Management at the University of
Minnesota,
and Catherine Havasi of the MIT Media Lab,
and moderated by Katy Mogal of Jawbone. The discussion focused on integrated thinking
and the intersection of behavior economics, data science and anthropology. The
discussion covered a lot of ground but a key takeaway was how important context
is in ethnography, and how context, creativity, confusion contradiction, and
conflict (5Cs) lead to ethnographic insights.
Next up was a man who really didn’t need much introduction,
judging by the market research fanbase on Twitter. Malcolm Gladwell, renowned
author of Blink, The Tipping Point, Outliers, and most recently David and
Goliath
focused on ‘the inverted U curve’ and how all too often we’re focused
on one part of the curve but not the other, if we even know the curve exists. We need to take a step back and sometimes do some meta-analysis to see
the bigger picture. 

Gladwell also
focused on the ‘won’t’ vs. the ‘can’t’ ‘ there are often not enough incentives
for people to say ‘I have enough’ and he posited that perhaps capping spending
for healthcare or capping R&D budgets could actually solve problems. He also highlighted that there’s also not typically a dearth of information, often ‘we don’t need more information, we need more action.’  There’s an entire other post here on the blog regarding his talk, so I’ll move on, but I want to give you a sense of some of the other talks.  But to give you a sense of the popularity of
Gladwell’s talk, the #TMRE13 hashtag reached 144,392 impressions in 14 minutes
of his talk ‘ wow!

The day was just beginning! Soon after Gladwell’s talk I
attended ‘Upping Your Seat at the Table’ given by Aaron Fetters of Kellogg’s. Fetters feels that the ‘seat
at the table’ is waiting for us, and that businesses generally have a desire
for insights to play a bigger role. In order to snag that seat we need to
expand our sources of knowledge and view of where insights come from (social,
CRM systems, loyalty programs, etc.), build and foster the right skills on your
team, and create services and solutions that really fuel brand growth. He
advocates putting research and analytics in the same working group (something
we’ve done as well that has been very successful). 

The key soundbite from the session
was that we as researchers need to ‘learn to walk from the computer room to the
board room’ ‘ essentially speak both languages, from stats to storytelling in
order to communicate to both teams and drive from insights to action.

Next up, Dorothy White and Leigh O’Donnell of Mars Petcare shared some concrete examples of how to evangelize and amplify insights
throughout the organization. Their framework included to-do’s for every step of
the project, from performing executive interviews and aligning objectives,
methodology and logistics before project kickoff, to testing for surprises and
prepping for action during the project, to polishing the message and ‘workshop ’til
you drop’ after the results are in.
Finally, the last session I attended was one of the best of
the conference, given by Kate Pomeroy of Pernod Ricard USA focusing on ‘Converting
Insights into Action.’ It was a rollicking presentation that covered everything
from salt licks to bottle service, from body shots to Portlandia all wrapped up into an insightful presentation with some actionable takeaways
on how to craft compelling insights, look for the tension, challenge beliefs
and behaviors, visually bringing research to life, and becoming a cultural
force to be reckoned with (create a workshop culture and a strong research ‘brand’).
Pomeroy said: ‘The worst thing you can say to me is that I’m ‘the research
person’ and the best compliment would be ‘you create value.”

I hope you all enjoyed your time at #TMRE13 and came away
with some actionable insights, lots of business cards, and some new friends! It’s
been my honor to tweet and blog the conference for you, and I hope to see you
all back next year at #TMRE14 in Boca Raton.  I’d love to stay connected with you – you can
always find me on Twitter and at my blog.  Safe travels back home! 


_______________

More about Katie: Based in Portland, Maine, Katie is the Senior Research Manager at Diversified Business Communications, managing a team of skilled researchers busy gleaning insights for products around the globe. She has worked with companies large and small in industries such as software, seafood, fragrance and entertainment to help companies move their business forward supported by actionable insights derived from market research. She loves to find the story in the numbers and is passionate about bringing the ‘Voice of the Customer’ inside the organization. Active on social media as @InsightsGal, Katie actively tweets and blogs about the market research industry. The opinions expressed here are her own and not those of her employer.

Live from #TMRE13: Day 2 Recap ‘ Looking to the Future, Selling the Right Way, FOMO, and Engagementification!

Today’s post comes from TMRE Guest Blogger, Katie Clark. She is also known as @InsightsGal on Twitter and is a client-side market researcher, project manager, and social media maven.  

Wow, what a day at #TMRE13! The day was bookended by some fabulous keynote speakers, and mid-day we had no less than NINE tracks of sessions to choose from.  From Strategic Planning to Disruptive Technologies & New Methodologies, there was definitely something for everyone offered today.

Kicking off the morning was Jeffrey Cole, Director of the USC Annenberg Center for the Digital Future who shared results from a study that has been in process for 10+ years, yielding some fascinating insights  and well as sharing his thoughts on the future.  

We learned that FOMO (fear of missing out) is actually a thing. Discussing social networks (including Friendster ‘which was the coolest social network for about 12 minutes ‘) Cole feels that Facebook will continue to grow, especially in developing countries, but will survive as ‘the phone book to the planet’ while folks decamp to smaller networks to socialize. Finally, Cole’s advice to brands? ‘Your learning curve must be steeper than your action curve!’

Next up was Dan Pink, author of To Sell is Human, who right off debunked the myth that we don’t need sales folks.  1 in 9 American workers in 2000 were in sales.  Now? The same, 1 in 9.  However, as Pink shared, our gut reaction when we think ‘sales’ is ‘a guy in a suit selling a car.’  In fact, when asking research participants to share what came to mind when they thought of sales, the below is what emerged: 

The world of sales has changed ‘ we’ve moved from ‘buyer beware’ to ‘seller beware’, so the old mantra of ‘Always Be Closing’ no longer holds water. Pink suggests an alternate: Attunement, Bouyancy and Clarity. 

Jumping into sessions, we learned a new mashup word from Randall Janisch of Ford Motor Company ‘ Engagementification – in his talk ‘Keep it Simple: Simple Innovations in Research Methodology that Go a Long Way.’ Janisch focused on innovations from simple ones like making survey questions more visually appealing to more complex or creative methodologies like Ford’s LiveDrive ‘ live, mobile broadcasting (audio/video) so only the moderator goes on the drive along, and the clients follow along in real time online, and can interact with the moderator with questions/prompts. Ford has found this helpful as it removes the reliance on post-drive recall.

The NGMR Award winners (more on that below) were interviewed in a panel discussion led by Kristin Luck of Decipher and Tom Anderson of Odin Text, Anderson Analytics. Key takeaways from the winners included ‘reverse mentoring ‘ hire folks younger than you as there’s a lot to be learned from them’ and ‘to market yourself in market research you need to be a thought leader ‘ don’t be afraid to take a stand!’ 

The keynotes that rounded out the day were from Jeremy Sack, Director of the Pragmatic Brain Science Institute, LRW, and futurist Jared Weiner, VP at Weiner, Edrich, Brown, Inc.  Jeremy Sack shared his research on stereotyping and how brand stereotyping creates reality.  In order to improve brand stereotypes, ‘the change effort must feel authentic, the interaction must feel cooperative.’ Jared Weiner then took us on a tour of the near future, where gameification will ‘underpin everything’ and where time is simultaneous not sequential, and taught us we should use ‘alien eyes’ to look at things objectively and remove ‘educated incapacity.’ 

Finally, befitting an industry gathering, there were two sets of awards given out today, the EXPLOR awards and the NGMR Disruptive Innovation Awards.  Congrats to the CDC and Mktg Incorporated who snagged the top EXPLOR award prize! Congrats also go out to BrainJuicer, Insites Consulting, and Bob Lederer (of Research Business Daily Report fame) for winning the NGMR Disruptive Innovation Awards!

Tomorrow promises to be another busy day of learning and networking…and Malcolm Gladwell! See you all bright and early!   

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More about Katie: Based in Portland, Maine, Katie is the Senior Research Manager at Diversified Business Communications, managing a team of skilled researchers busy gleaning insights for products around the globe. She has worked with companies large and small in industries such as software, seafood, fragrance and entertainment to help companies move their business forward supported by actionable insights derived from market research. She loves to find the story in the numbers and is passionate about bringing the ‘Voice of the Customer’ inside the organization. Active on social media as @InsightsGal, Katie actively tweets and blogs about the market research industry. The opinions expressed here are her own and not those of her employer.