Tag Archives: news

This Week In Market Research: 8/3/15 – 8/7/15

If you’ve ever started a blog you understand the struggle to maintain traffic and build a following. So how do you cope with all of the hair pulling out and ups and downs of watching your traffic ebb and flow? According to Entrepreneur this week, there are 4 easy reasons your blog may not be getting the traffic it deserves. The number one reason listed is pretty obvious and one that I would assume a lot of people forget to do. Not sharing your blog socially on all other social networks ignores a large pool of people that could serve as an attentive audience. Think about it. If you’re on Facebook you probably have an exuberant amount of ‘friends’ (that’s in quotes because, well come on, we all know 700 real friends is exaggerated.) Odds are, out of those ‘friends’ a good bunch of them will stop to read your posts and, if they find the material engaging, become regular visitors. The three other reasons listed are also very possible and helpful to anyone trying to boost their blog following.
Market research. It’s a term that’s thrown around all of the time, but what does it mean and how can small businesses with small budgets utilize it? You may be surprised to learn that market research can mean anything from market trends to consumer insights and that all of these things can be found on twitter. That’s right. In our moment of confusion and desperation we turn to the world of Twitter and social media. According to Adweek, there are 5 ways to really utilize market research on Twitter. Among the 5 different ways listed, Adweek mentions the Twitter function of tracking trends. It makes sense right? Whether it’s trending hashtags or trending usernames, organizations can learn valuable research from following the ‘what’s trending’ function on Twitter. Now you’re curious about the other 4 right? Read the full article on AdWeek’s website.
Remember that documentary that was released a few years back called Blackfish? Yeah, you and everyone’s mother remembers the shocking documentary that exposed SeaWorld and its treatment of killer whales. Well, here they are again in the spotlight but this time it’s because the theme park is spending $10 million to make people forget about ‘Blackfish.’ According to a recent article on Fast Company, SeaWorld is spending $10 million on an extensive marketing campaign that will combine the use of new television commercials, quarter-page print ads as well as ramping up their online ‘truth campaign.’ ”What we wanted with this campaign was to start that conversation with consumers and give them a place to go to get the facts about SeaWorld, about our animals, and about our world-class animal care, and let them make up their own minds.” Well there you have it. As a consumer, what do you think?
According to a recent article on Market Place.com this week, Kate Spade, Michael Kors, and Coach all of one thing in common: they’re stuck in a handbag rut. But why is this the case? Pam Danziger who is an analyst that tracks the ‘rich’ for Unity Marketing claims that it can be attributed to a group of people she likes to label the ‘HENRYs.’ This acronym stands for ‘High earners, not rich yet’ and hold incomes over $100,000. Her claim is that, although they would have dropped hundreds on handbags before the recession, ”now, even though their income and investments have largely recovered from the downturn, they don’t quite feel rich enough to splurge on this season’s hot new bucket bag.’ Throughout the article Danziger analyzes more evidence from market research to make sense of this drop in luxury handbag sales. Curious to see how customer perceive luxury handbags? Well you’re in luck! There is a short quiz at the end of the article for readers that explores this question.

Insights to Strategy: The Story of Chobani

Sonia Dalvi, Brand Manager of Shopper Marketing at Chobani, opened up the session with a genuine introduction of
Chobani’s founder, Hamdi Ulukaya.
‘If
I’m going to have peaches in my yogurt, then they’re going to be peaches, there
is just no other way.’
‘ Hamdi Ulukaya, founder if Chobani
She continued through the history of Chobani and the vision of
the company. 
History: Turkish by decent, Chobani’s president wanted to
provide better food options to people.
DNNA- deliecious nutritious natural and affordable-
characteristics Chobani wants to leverage across. Usually price point is off,
or products are healthy yet taste bad.
**call out important nutritionals, colors are important,
being transparent with the consumer is most important
When she first started, Sonia was given a shopper insights project. This came to be a very insightful experience providing invaluable information that the company had not even thought about. 
Through completing the project, she came up with a few guiding principles. 
1.       1. Shopper insights= a journey, not a destination
a.      
Think more than just
2.      
2. If it’s not actionable, it’s just academic
b.      
There are valuable insights for both internal
and external teams. Keep insights relevant for all involved
3.       3. One size does not fit all
c.      
They wanted to connect with the growing
millennial shopper but growing as a brand think of all the shopper groups at
your disposal and you can even segment within that group.
She continued to describe the project, first defining the goal and parameters. 
What was the goal?
                How can
yogurt become a destination again- fun
Who is the shopper?
                Who are the influencers- how does she navigate, what value does she bring to the
category
Focus on IN THE MOMENT research:
                Qualitative and quantative elements to discover how is the shopper environment is influencing her
decision making.
Learnings
Pre-shop is critical in the category- yogurt consumption is highly planned and
purchased out of habit. You must drive awareness before she enters store. Use media content, online coupons, ads to remind all to drive trial. 
Brand and flavor are key influencers as they are the most
important factors in the category. Consumers had a specific set in mind before even getting to the
shelf.
Shoppers spend minimal time at shelf vs other food
categories. The shelf is confusing with so many options so make your brand the “go-to” leaving no time for guessing. 
Are there differences by region?

East coasters are planners- they know Greek and know their
brands- they do their research and make informed decisions. 
West coasters are newer to Greek- they have a wide consideration set and value global
ingredients. For this reason they are prone to impulse purchases which is highly uncommon in a non-impulse category. Chobani ensures they capitalize on this. 
Shoppers desire portability- the on the go pouch option is
really valuable in this space.
Shoppers’ desire for yogurt extends beyond breakfast. Full fat yogurts are growing ‘ expanding consumption was a
big theme.
Now what
After deriving the insights, Sonia next had to turn this into a strategic plan. She kook these results and worked with marketing team to revamp their story and strategy. They focused on a few key elements:
                Pre-store
connection
The emotional connection with
yogurt- how does it make you feel? Driving this buzz and excitement was a
powerful tool they utilized.
                Packaging
Cluttered shelf makes it hard to
break through- extenuating the packaging and logo and also call out the nutrition
facts.
                Engaging
consumers in store to drive brand
                                Colorful
powerful way to engage the consumer though in store danglers and setups.
The key was to build solutions around entire path to purchase.
She left us with some takeaways: 
-        - Strong vision and mission can aid navigation in
a  competitive category
-        - Contextual ‘in the moment’ research is an effective tool to both understand and change behavior

-        - Research provides the most value when it is actionable
and used to connect with shoppers through integrated programs

Janel Parker, Market Research Consultant at SKIM, an international consultancy and marketing research agency, has a background in Marketing and Psychology from Cornell University. Her previous experience at a social media agency combined with her knowledge from SKIM provide for a unique understanding of the relationships between social media and marketing. She can be reached at j.parker@skimgroup.com.

Life is full of “micromoments” retailers need to capitalize on

The World of “Search”- we go on there with a purpose and a
specific intent to go on there. We see 100 Billion searches every month- and
we’re seeing a rise in these coming from mobile. They’re searching with an
intent to shop. Vikram Tank of Google delivered an insightful presentation to describe these “micromoments” consumers are on mobile that brands need to take advantage of. 
Intent and immediacy
Intent
We’re tuning in more than ever. We’re doing this on multiple
devices. With less time, consumers are ticking in a higher conversion rate.
Moments are those short times you are on your phone when the
user is in control. Brands and retails don’t have too much time to play.
Micromoments- These are where brands can flourish. Users are
showing intent to do something with a brand or retailer- where to go to lunch,
watching makeup videos. These happen throughout the day. These opportunities are replacing those longer research at the desktop
             

Tank described 4 different micromoments and how brands can play a role.

 I want
to know

To look up anything and
everything. They are immediately satisfying their curiosity. 66% of people pick
up their phone too looking up info in the middle of a conversation.
This is multi-tasking at its’
finest.
I want to go
The ‘what’s near me’ searches-
they show intent of where consumes are going. 50% of consumers who search out a
place on their phone end up going there within 2 days; 18% of them actually
make purchases. What happens to the rest? They don’t go- they’re afraid
something will be out of stock ‘ they don’t want to waste the time since
they’re not fully convinced.
Looking at these searches- people
aren’t looking up brands- they’re looking to meet their needs. Brands need to provide a more useful
experience here
.
I want to do
These are really under the radar
and brands can play a role here. Online tutorials allow people to learn
themselves. Retailers need to take advantage here and really offer the support
and experience customers want.
I want to buy
When purchase decisions are being
made. There are many funnels and consumer are jumping down at different points.
82% of consumer use their smartphone while in a store.
BUT, where are these conversions
happening? Conversion rates on desktop are 2X higher- we need to work on making
it easier for consumers to purchase on mobile where all of this research is
being done.
While in store, 1 in 4 people have
changed their mind about buying something while in check-out line because of
something they saw on their phone.
Topics that live across all moments;
                Immediacy
                                Research
and ability have allowed us to demand immediacy and this is not going away.
                Higher
expectations
                                No
one wants to deal with the annoyances of inserting address over and over.
                Loyal
to needs

                                People
know their needs and want them to be met. 

Janel Parker, Market
Research Consultant at SKIM, an international consultancy and marketing
research agency, has a background in Marketing and Psychology from Cornell
University. Her previous experience at a social media agency combined with her
knowledge from SKIM provide for a unique understanding of the relationships
between social media and marketing. She can be reached at
j.parker@skimgroup.com.

The real insights on connecting with your consumer: how generational characteristics impact marketing strategy

How did ‘Millennials’ come about? We all use this term but
little know the actual meaning behind it.
Neil Howe opened up with this insightful fact explaining
that this group will graduate in 2000- granting them the title, ‘Millennials’.
Generations last about 20 years and they have attitudes and
behaviors in common that differ from those of other generations. It’s a length
of a socially defined phase of life. This causes discontinuous gaps of
generations.
One important note:
always consider thinking about someone’s parents when describing their fit into
a generation as this also impacts their traits.
G.I generation:
Think Kennedy, Reagan, Walt Disney- they had this spirit of sacrifice. We gave
them respected, granting them the name ‘Senior Citizens’ as opposed to ‘Old
People’ used in the past.
 Silent generation: Signal a break- Think Elvis Presley, John
McCain, Colin Powell, MLK. ‘We don’t want to change the system, we want to work
within the system.’ They were not risk takers
Boomers: Clintons,
Oprah Winfrey, Springsteen- Their individualism, their sense of self
sufficiency. Women began to think of themselves as economically
self-sufficient. Their value orientation- good vs bad, true vs. false, right
vs. wrong. They like the experience of things. The ‘yuppie’ culture.
They’re suspicious of
omnishopping
. They don’t like those cameras, they don’t want their name
noted, but they do account for majority of Amazon.com shoppers. They’re not
retiring instead they’re working longer.
Gen X: Think
Obama, Michael Jordan, Kurt Cobain- today 32-52- lack of commonality- most
spread out in terms of income and wealth. ‘I get somewhere form being different
form my peers.’ Generation born into divorce rate, economic struggles, and
skepticism. Maximum individualism and risk taking. They appeal to efficiency,
incentives, and survivalism.
Omnishoppnig to them deals with competition- extreme
couponing and coupon codes- they want to get the edge on people.
Millennials:
Think Zuckerberg, Taylor Swift, Bruno Mars- They came right after the divorce
rate peaked as did the abortion rate and recreational drugs ‘ this caused
society to want to give kids a new sense of structure, optimism, etc. Baby
protection home devices become popular- cities become safer- child well being
considered much higher and children are considered ‘special’. X’ers are
resentful and so take this out on Millennials which has shown to be less than
optimal.
This change can also be found in the military where a
completely new approach has been taken to train these Millennials involving a
more work along- personal approach as opposed to the previous ‘break them down
and rebuild them’ hardcore approach.
They’re more positive in all aspects of life. Risk seeking
and independence are lower. They’re looking for long term planning. They look
for gamification. They like to be connected with family and use technology to
do so.

They will face huge crises- geopolitical, economic, and this
will reshape them profoundly.  

Janel Parker, Market
Research Consultant at SKIM, an international consultancy and marketing
research agency, has a background in Marketing and Psychology from Cornell
University. Her previous experience at a social media agency combined with her
knowledge from SKIM provide for a unique understanding of the relationships
between social media and marketing. She can be reached at
j.parker@skimgroup.com.

Uncovering Aisle Shopper Myths

How can you drive impulse purchases? Red Bull continues to explore this concept in order to optimize their presence. Together with DataMining representatives, Laura-Lynn of Red Bull North America they presented a compelling story about in store shopping.

There is an art to it. The art is very basic:

  • Tempt by being in their path- analysze the store consumers and segments
  • Be relevant- what are the needs of the demographic in store- do they want your product?
  • Timing is right- what are the dynamics of the store- proximity plays a key role in placement. 
Red Bull worked with a team to monitor every second of every consumers’ shopping trip. Each segment is different – males vs. females, millennials vs. boomers, etc. To complicate things even more- these trends change by channel. 

5 Myths about Center Store Shoppers:
  1. Center store is primary stop for many shoppers
    • This is not true  - the majority of shoppers are looking for products that are actually in the perimeter
      • 18% shop center store  vs. >50% Shop perimeter
    • What does this mean? Perhaps use messaging on the perimeter to drive traffic to center store..
  2. Shoppers spend more time center store 
    • Most time is navigation followed by 28% of the time spent on the perimeter while only 22% of time is spent in center store. BUT- 75% of spending is made in center store- so how can we make this more relevant to shoppers to drive even more purchase in this shorter amount of time spent here which amounts to about 3 minutes in grocery? 
  3. Shoppers engage longer with center store categories 
    • People spend just 23 seconds on average shopping center store. How can you engage in that short period of time? 
  4. If they come they will buy
    • Not necessarily true – for ever 100 people walking into a store, only 6 buy from a perimeter category. This is even less for center store categories. 
    • This creates an opportunity- when people don’t shop a category it’s tough to convince. BUT if people already shop the category, it’s quite easy to convince them to make this purchase. 
  5. Front of store end caps are more effective
    • High traffic does not equal sales. The conversion rate for category shoppers actually making a purchase is 44% for front end caps while BACK END CAPS show 58%. 
Janel Parker, Market
Research Consultant at SKIM, an international consultancy and marketing
research agency, has a background in Marketing and Psychology from Cornell
University. Her previous experience at a social media agency combined with her
knowledge from SKIM provide for a unique understanding of the relationships
between social media and marketing. She can be reached at
j.parker@skimgroup.com.

You had me at Kit-Kat…

What better way to kick off a presentation than to hand out candy?
Better yet- Immediately after- read off trivia questions in exchange for Hershey’s
newest products?
Shelly and Tony delivered an intriguing presentation offering insights around touchpoints. With OmniShopper the focus of this conference- understanding touchpoints is an important aspect to truly reach success. 
First off- what exactly is a touchpoint? It is a point in time when a brand comes in
contact with the audience. Ex ‘ packaging, instore promotion, coupons, flyers,
etc. Hershey used a qualitative approach, focusing on shop-alongs, mobile shop alongs
(both for exploration), as well as shopper diaries for validation. They asked consumers who they were buying for, when
are they buying, etc. This led them to reveal the best touchpoints to focus on
and in turn maximize shopper reach at core retailers.
This approach also included steps to better understand the consumer:
o  
Where
?? 
Where do we look for consumers and thus focus on
these touchpoints?
o  
How many
?? 
Using TURF, they looking into the impact of how
many touch points are needed to maximize sales.
?? 
About 4 touch points are necessary.
o  
Which Ones
?? 
What is the best combination of touch points.
??        
Segmentation
o  
This is key as all consumers are different. Did
consumers plan to purchase this confectionery or was this an impulse purchase? While this may seem simple and all end up in the same place- with a sale- it is actually very important to understand how and when to reach this consumer based on their motives.
??        
Opportunities
o  
Using data they found that some consumers just
need to be reminded. Perhaps an in store ad seeing the treat at check out- a
simple touch point on their trip is enough to drive a purchase.

They also offered a set of truths about touchpoints:

??         The shopper ecosystem is cluttered with touchpoints
but shoppers really only see 3 products
on average
in the confections category. How is this possible and how does this impact strategy? This drives the importance of understanding the segments and learning how influential each touchpoint can be. 
??        
Most touchpoint usage occurs for planned trips since consumers are being hit with something pre-store so they then add to their list-
essentially leveraging many more touch points
??        
Shoppers recognize and use more touchpoints on
involved trips- especially for stock up trips that are planned.
??        
On unplanned trips alone, touch points form 4-6
increased dollar spending about $2.00
??        
Allocate spend across different touch points:
you can reach most consumers using 4 touch points
??        
The most influential touch points differ by
channel: Grocery relies most on coupons.
??        
Word of Mouth is most important: Case in point-
the presenters mentioned candy to the audience yesterday and people were overly
excited to join!
??        
Digital provides an incremental space for
touchpoints, adding 4 additional touchpoints for consumers.
??        
Higher income use more touchpoints yet least involved

??        
Life stage: we know Millennials are big users of
digital which goes hand in hand with the additional touch points exposed
earlier. 

With these points we realize just how many touch points exist, how important it is to leverage these touchpoints based on consumer segments, and how these are continuing to change as technology advances. 

Janel Parker, Market
Research Consultant at SKIM, an international consultancy and marketing
research agency, has a background in Marketing and Psychology from Cornell
University. Her previous experience at a social media agency combined with her
knowledge from SKIM provide for a unique understanding of the relationships
between social media and marketing. She can be reached at
j.parker@skimgroup.com.

OmniShopper15: We have all the data… now what?

David Schweidel delivered an eye opening presentation on data. From big to small to complex to simple- he was able to explain the more important fact of the matter- drawing insights. 

Big data = big insights. But this gives
us too much data and not enough direction as to where to go with it. It’s not
about the size- it’s about what can we extract.
Defining Big Data
-         
3 Vs (volume, variety, velocity)
-         
4 Vs (volume, variety, velocity, veracity/value)
-         
So big that Excel can’t handle it
Big insights drive decisions. Collecting data from
customers (in a loyalty program) allows us to draw simple insights. We don’t
need big data to figure out who purchases certain products. If you purchased a
big screen TV, you’re most likely to come back for another for your bedroom.
We need smart thinking and smart use of big data more so
than the big data itself.
 
How do we convince consumers to give us that data. Should we
make investments and what do they get in response for providing data. Most
importantly-customers want something out of it.
Disney has taken data to another level- in using these bands
where consumers can pay for things and wait in line allows underground
operations to recognize XX ride has a long line- let’s send out beverages or
costume characters to entertain.


Identify what we
need, collect it, and Analyze it
.
How do we make use of
the data that is available to us?
Start to derive trends from within the data. It is possible
to segment consumers based on purchase decision and discover who your most
equitable consumer is. Is that full service cable purchaser who later drops the
HBO package your most important customer or is it that customer who starts
basic and upgrades to full service later?
Primary vs. secondary
data
What causes people to end their cable service? It’s important to
find out these obstacles and find out how your business can improve. We need to
utilize the post purchase evaluations and gather data from web blogs, etc. to
understand consumer mishaps.
Retailers are typically open to sharing some information
they receive from consumers in order to show they are collecting and using this
for a good cause. Retailers are trying to improve consumer satisfaction and
this is a step in the right direction to doing so. This also helps to reaffirm
to consumers that the data being collected is relevant to their future
experience with the brand.
Know your competitors
and how to react to their actions.
How can your brand react to competitive moves from other
companies out there? Stay on top of trends and learn from what others have
implemented.
Bring social to CRM
Paint the full picture of the customer and reach them in
relevant areas. This is all to important to courting the omnichannel!
Social influence on purchase
Brand engagement and advocacy

Lead generating
Janel Parker, Market
Research Consultant at SKIM, an international consultancy and marketing
research agency, has a background in Marketing and Psychology from Cornell
University. Her previous experience at a social media agency combined with her
knowledge from SKIM provide for a unique understanding of the relationships
between social media and marketing. She can be reached at
j.parker@skimgroup.com.

More than Just Sales: Tremendous Insights You Can Use Everyday with Daniel Pink

Pink began by offering 3 key ingredients to effective presentations:

-         
Brevity
-         
Levity
-         
Repetition

Selling has changed more in the past 10 years than the
previous 100. This change happens so quickly we can barely register it
happening.

We are now in a phase of Buyer Beware- information asymmetry
has changed so much and now with the information we now have right at our
fingertips we are much better informed and can refute unethical sellers.
To address this, Pink offered 3 points to focus on:

1.      
Attunement
Understand the consumer through
their eyes. What do they know- that information do they have access to?
2.      
Buoyancy
How do you stay afloat in an ocean of
rejection? In an experiment Pink presented, the best predictor of success was an
explanatory style- a way to explain failure that allowed individuals to stay
afloat in the ocean of rejection they commonly are exposed to. Interrogative
self-talk- questions to elicit an active response- initiate wheels to turn ‘ ‘can
you do this and if so, how’? This thought provoking means of motiving yourself
has a much larger positive impact on your ability to succeed after failure than
either unthoughtful self talk or no self talk at all.
3.      
Clarity
We all have access to information so our
competitive advantage is curating information- find out what’s important and capitalize
on this. ‘It’s all about expertise’.
If you client knows their problem, they don’t
need you. When they’re wrong about their problem- that’s where you shine.
Identify hidden problems to truly bloom.

Next we had the opportunity to learn some of Pink’s
insights:
-         
There
lies an inverse correlation between feelings of power and perspective taking
We were asked to take part of an
experiment- define your dominant hand, snap 4 times, and then draw an E on your
head. We later analyzed what this meant- did you draw this E from your own perspective
or from the outsiders view? Pink later connected this to power and how this
influences our everyday lives.
Power leads individuals to think of
themselves as more important and take their own perspective.
One can increase their effectiveness by
briefly reducing feelings of power. This is important for bosses as harnessing
the best from your team involves finding a way to motivate them. This is done
by reducing your own feelings of power which increase your sense of perspective
taking allowing you to better understand how to motivate your team.

-         
Don’t try
to be someone you’re not
Ambiverts, people who are somewhat
introverted and somewhat extraverted, outperformed the introverts and
extroverts in the software sales experiment. This curve also represents the general
population- the odds are good that you are good at this already- focus on
developing your expertise.

-         
How much
information do you need to give someone for them to be persuaded?
‘More is better’ is not the case. What is
the sweet spot for how many claims you must make before it’s too much and
overwhelms the consumer. 3 claims is the perfect amount after which consumers
become skeptical.
Adding a minor negative detail to a
positive description has a more positive impact. This adds credibility and
provides a benchmark for us to compare against.  The little negative shines a light on that
positive and enacts the contrast effect.

-         
Give
people an off ramp
Make it easy to do something you want them
to do. If you make it easy for people to act- you can get people to do it!
Think- opt-outs, automatic enrollment- don’t try to persuade just make it easy!
When we try to explain behaviors- we always
overweight the importance of their personality and underweight the context they’re
in.

Pink left us captivated with his ability to address all
questions and provide interesting experimental conclusions to supplement his
point of view.

Janel Parker, Market
Research Consultant at SKIM, an international consultancy and marketing
research agency, has a background in Marketing and Psychology from Cornell
University. Her previous experience at a social media agency combined with her
knowledge from SKIM provide for a unique understanding of the relationships
between social media and marketing. She can be reached at
j.parker@skimgroup.com.

Live from #OmniShopper15: ‘Leveraging Virtual Store Research for Shopper Decision Trees Analysis’

As choices expand beyond belief it becomes important to
understand the decision making process consumers use to make that final
purchase. In order to do so, Liz Cox showed us how we can create decision trees to follow consumers
through this process.

The Decision tree demonstrates how consumers shop in a
category. They are use strategically (where brands compete, white space
opportunities) and tacticfully (heling shoppers shop).
Consumers are put into a 3D environment online shopping experience
and asked to shop as they would normally. They can pick up and read labels and
make their decisions from there. This combines the attitudinal and behavioral
aspects which are most important to develop the tree.
We all know decisions are made at shelf so it is trivial to
reach consumers at this point. Consumers immerse themselves in this environment
and this allows us to test different factors and manipulate the environment to derive
these factors.
What happens when virtual shelves meet shopping decision
trees? Do shopping behaviors change depending on the specific need? (Self vs.
party, single candy bar that neve makes it home, etc.). Through testing online
it is easy to change these factors and understand consumer tradeoffs. It is
possible to aggregate this data to find trends across decisions. Certain
shelves that are lower may be uncomfortable to reach and thus cause consumers
to stray away from those.
This type of research has many opportunities for use and
will become more important as we try to understand consumers in this evolving
context.

Janel Parker, Market
Research Consultant at SKIM, an international consultancy and marketing
research agency, has a background in Marketing and Psychology from Cornell
University. Her previous experience at a social media agency combined with her
knowledge from SKIM provide for a unique understanding of the relationships
between social media and marketing. She can be reached at
j.parker@skimgroup.com.

This Week In Market Research: 7/6/15 – 7/10/15

4 Steps To Start Listening And Start Social Listening 

What Marketers Need To Know About Consumers’ Attitudes To Sharing Data: Persuading customers of the benefits of sharing data

How To Use Social Media To Market Your Business: It’s not all quick and easy

Jumping Into The Mobile Marketing Waters: Shark Week and multi-screens

Caesars Entertainment Bets Big On Big Data And Wins: The three best practices for big data projects

Common Biases That Skew Big Data Results: Flawed data can lead to faulty conclusions

Virtual Reality: How it could change shopper marketing and B2B

American Express Launches It’s Own PayPal Alternative: Checkout pages are crowded  so AMEX is creating its own real estate

Winning Google’s Search Results: This simple practice will help you out

5 Strategies To Optimize Email Marketing Targeting Millennials

About the Author:
Ryan Polachi is a contributing
writer concentrating his focus on Marketing, Finance and Innovation. He can be
reached at rpolachi@IIRUSA.com.