Tag Archives: myspace

Can Web 2.0 Work for Enterprise 2.0?

By Madan Sheina, Ovum analyst

In spite of its roaring success on consumer IT desktops, considerable skepticism still remains about the value of Web 2.0 in business organizations. Can Web 2.0 technologies like wikis, blogs, and social networking really help to grow a business and make the leap to Enterprise 2.0?

It used to be the case that open source was a momentary distraction for CIOs and IT directors. Not any more. More companies are asking their IT leaders to apply open source to their corporate IT strategies. The same cannot be said of Web 2.0 technologies. However, Web 2.0 is expected to creep its way into the vernacular of business software over the coming years.

The success of consumer-led Web 2.0 technologies cannot be ignored. Facebook, MySpace, blogs, RSS, mash-ups, Ajax, and a myriad of other web-based technologies all now rally under the Web 2.0 banner.

Some of these are now starting to show potential behind corporate firewalls to facilitate more effective forms of collaboration (beyond standard email) and provide a richer, more interactive information experience for business IT users, including the two-way use of the Web that allows users not only to access information but also to express their own knowledge.

Enterprise software vendors are also starting to bake 2.0 capabilities into their applications. For example, SAP uses wikis and blogs extensively on its SDN, and Oracle has built social networking into a broad-release CRM offering.

While many Web 2.0 technologies are now deployed for enterprise use, they are still a long way from being mature or universal. The trick is to figure out how to take Web 2.0 ideas and use them in a business environment to interact better with employees, customers, and suppliers. It is not a direct translation. IT users have distinct needs from consumers, and organizations will have to carefully target, evaluate, and refine their initial Web 2.0 deployments.

In particular, companies should consider Web 2.0 not in terms of technology but as an enhanced web information experience for solving business problems. For example, instead of looking at blog-style publishing, wiki-style editing, and social networking as just tools, enterprises should frame their use in business scenarios or goals, both within and outside the four walls of the enterprise as a way to better engage with their most profitable customers or build up a stronger corporate online brand.

Importantly, Web 2.0 is also about advancing information experiences for business users, helping them to make the most of the systems and data management investments that a company has already put in place. Web 2.0 helps to make IT systems user-friendly and accessible. It allows for communities of interest to be built from crowds of business users looking at certain slices of corporate information.

Finally, Web 2.0 information experience also calls for a bi-directional link between users and information. One of the biggest benefits of Web 2.0 is the opportunity to use the activities and business domain expertise within businesses as they interact with information. Rather than being passive information consumers, users participate in its creation and organization through tagging, commentary, and ranking.

Adding Web 2.0 to an enterprise context also represents a democratic and social shift for a company’s IT strategy, moving control from the organization’s IT department to individual users. But traditional views of enterprise IT are still relatively conservative. Few companies are prepared to look outside the box at unproven Web 2.0 models, especially in tight economic times.

As with any new and evolving technology, implementing Web 2.0 tools is a risk. The risk is more pronounced given the unclear return on investment from their use, which is ultimately measured in how effectively people collaborate, as opposed to business optimization or revenue-generating ideas.

Only when companies start to understand the information-democratizing benefits of these tools, the specific business case scenarios for uses of the applications, and the effort and cost of implementing them, will there be widescale adoption.

Related research

Beyond Web 2.0: what’s in store

Should Social Networks Go to School?

The NYTimes blog, Gadgetwise discusses the newfangled thought that social networks should be in schools. Taken from a report out of San Francisco, Paul Boutin of Gadgetwise contends that social networks may not have a place in school because kids flock to social networks to get away from authority–not be friends with it. Though there may be a few students who friend their teachers in a Tracy Flick sort of way. What do you think? Should schools embrace and/or create their own social networks?

Facebook Isn’t So Safe Anymore

Facebook compared to MySpace has a pretty squeaky clean reputation, but when Facebook has over 150 million users to date, then security becomes a much bigger concern. This latest post on TechCrunch details a few things that allowed Facebook to get to this point, and what it needs to do to change it.

When Facebook initially launched, users needed an .edu address in order to login, but now highschool students can create Facebook accounts and even the general public. Each group still belongs to a certain network, but it is still possible to overcome these challenges. MySpace has a pair of human eyes viewing every single picture that is uploaded to the site, to make sure that nothing inappropriate gets put up. Facebook relies on its users to flag inappropriate content. This is one thing that Facebook will have to improve as the number of registered users increase by the day.

Even with rules and regulations put into place, is it possible to stop every single threat? What have businesses done to ensure that their content does not get into the wrong hands?

Is AOL Selling Bebo?

Mike Butcher has the scoop on a possible fire sale of Bebo by AOL. AOL acquired Bebo only a year ago and its reported that the AOL execs aren’t too happy with the performance of this social networking site. According to Butcher’s article, the problem lies mostly with advertisers. As Bebo competes with Facebook and MySpace, advertisers are looking to explore more eyeballs through revenue on the more popular sites. Of course this info is speculation but Butcher has enough solid sources for us to keep a watch out on AOL. Read the article here and let us know what you think.

Social media diary 21/11/2008 – Sydney

Sydney uses MySpace to attract visitors

This week saw the launch of MySpace MySydney, a community for people who want to move to Sydney on a working visa. The page pitches itself as an online community and ‘Ben’ is your host (he’s the one on the video on the homepage). The site contains information on how to get a visa, travel information, advice on Sydney as a place to live and work and also aims to be a hub for networking with others in the same situation as you.
The site is from the Tourism New South Wales who are hoping to capitalise upon recent changes in the work and holiday visa regulations for US students. It’s now easier than it was for those from North America to get these visas and this MySpace site supports a wider marketing and social media push accompanying the change.

So what can we learn from this?

We’ve covered a lot of travel initiatives recently in the Social Media Diary – from BA’s Metrotwin, to Amex’s community for travel managers and Air France-KLM’s Bluenity. Travel is certainly an area where social networking and online communities are being used more and more to engage people. We see this at FreshNetworks, where the latest community we helped to launch this week is for a big UK travel brand. Travel has a number of great hooks for activities in social media – some people need information and have questions that other users can answer based on their experiences, it’s a subject that lends itself well to media and there is the opportunity for connecting people doing similar things in similar places. We’re seeing different travel brands trying different things – from setting up their own online communities, to interacting with people on Facebook or MySpace, providing social networking tools or just blogging.
Some of these initiatives are successful and some aren’t. What it seems that Sydney hope to achieve with this site is to present a lot of genuinely useful information in a way that is relevant to their target audience. They also hope to leverage some social networking – getting people in similar situations to get together, meet each other, share ideas and thoughts and between them build the usefulness of the site. This is an interesting proposition and I’ll be following how it pans out. Whilst I can see the clear benefit of the marketing and informational element of the site, I’ll be watching to see how (and in fact if) the social networking side of the proposition develops.
Whilst we often say that it is difficult for a brand to get a real presence in a social network, there is a real power of social networks to help people find others going through the same situation or with similar interests to them. It may be that getting people considering a move to Sydney to meet each other in MySpace might just work. We’ll wait and see.
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New Advertising Platform From MySpace

In latest news from MySpace, they have released a beta version of MyAds Service. It provides businesses with a tool to create customizable banner advertisements using HyperTargeting technology. This allows advertisers to create specific ads based on user demographics and interests. Relating back to the economy, Jeff Berman, President of MySpace Sales and Marketing, stated: “We’re giving businesses better ROI ASAP and in today’s economy, that’s a must-have.”

Social Networks: The New TV?

In this post on Social Times Robert O’Neil calls ‘social networks the new t.v.’ Robert bases this trend on a new agreement between Slide, Warner Brothers, News Corp, CPS, and Hulu that will allow Slide to distribute premium content over platforms.

Most social networks out there are opting for the partnership model; MySpace is a great example of this model. Slide has the most popular application on Facebook, but unfortunately for Facebook it doesn’t amount to much profit, only increased pageviews. Will Facebook as a platform try to gain more profit from popular applications in the future?

Making a Difference with SocialVibe

Mashable recently gave a great review of the online network SocialVibe which allows users to build sponsored widgets that give back to various charities. What’s great about this tool is that creating the widget is fairly simple, and SocialVibe does all the work in inserting your widget in existing profiles on Facebook and Myspace.

Since its launch six months ago, it has already generated over $120,000 for charities that they support. SocialVibe users don’t donate the money themselves or spam their friends, they just simply display the widget on the profile pages and click-throughs generate sponsored donations. Companies like Adobe, Apple, the NBA, and the UFC are among the sponsors involved.

MySpace Music’s new ad services

With the new launch of MySpace Music, they’ve also launched a new way to target the musicians surfing the site. According to this article at Social Times, this new self-service ad targeting service allows advertisers to choose which users see which ads selected by demographics.

After creating an ad that is either 728×90 or 300×250, the advertiser can choose to have it’s ad targeted by gender, age, location, specific interest or categories (such as music, movies, fitness and health, etc) . Then, users are broken down target audiences according to the selection of the advertiser. These campaigns run on a cost per click basis rather than impression.