Tag Archives: Mobile device

Why You Should Revisit Your Shopper Journey (And How To Do It Right)

This post was
originally published on Kelton
Global’s blog
.

Understanding the consumer journey has always been (and
still is) a crucial piece to closing the gap between interest and purchase. But
while fundamental needs haven’t changed, the customer journey is much more
layered and multi-directional.
Today’s consumer doesn’t just follow one of a handful of
discrete routes in their journey to purchasing a good or service. With the
Internet at their fingertips, shoppers now bounce around the traditionally
linear path to purchase’easily jumping from an in-store touchpoint to a digital
platform in the snap of a finger, gathering information from multiple sources
throughout the process.
Consumers can now leverage the wisdom of the crowd to
educate themselves before ever setting foot in a store.

Keep these two major shifts in mind when deciding on
research strategy for your next customer engagement journey project:
Consumers are wildly
more empowered in their relationship with brands.

We don’t just live in the age of information. We live in the
age of informational guidance, with unprecedented access to (and
considerable depths of) knowledge about almost anything there is to know about.
This is especially true when it comes to products and brands. Consumers can now
leverage the wisdom of the crowd to educate themselves before ever setting foot
in a store. This presents a huge opportunity for brands to garner awareness
among consumers shopping for their products. At the same time, this also means
exponentially more touchpoints to maintain and track, as well as heightened
expectations of consistent brand experiences across platforms.
Just as every shopper is able to consume information via the
Internet, they are equally as empowered to publish their own thoughts, reviews,
and experiences en masse. An opinion that was once voiced to a handful of peers
can now be amplified 1,000 fold by way of direct input and feedback platforms.
Rapid customer service response has never been more important as a result.
While companies have lost a degree of control over their digital narrative
thanks to bloggers and product/service review sites, the new landscape is not
without its advantages. Adding a digital footprint to brand perceptions offers
a valuable opportunity to monitor and better understand perceptions of your
brand, and what sites consumers are visiting online.
Today’s world is
defined by options.

The market landscape has become significantly more
fragmented and competitive.
Today’s world is defined by options. Consumers now have a
tremendous amount of choice in what products to buy and brands to engage with
in order to serve a given need. The rapid increase in number of options for
shoppers to explore, coupled with more ways to access and consume products,
means that consumers expect a brand experience that fits seamlessly into their
lives (not vice versa). What’s more, people browsing online now have easier
access to information about your competitors’ even comparing their products and
yours side by side. It’s important to visually communicate this aspect of a
shopper journey in a way that is clear and concise, so that your internal team
can understand and activate on consumers’ actual paths.

It can be difficult to capture the complexities of today’s
typical path to purchase, because there’s
nothing ‘typical’ about it
. Keeping to the traditional research model for
path to purchase is no longer an option, because it doesn’t paint a complete
picture of the varied journeys a consumer may realistically take. But
abandoning the model entirely isn’t the solution, either. We believe in a
differentiated philosophy based on key shifts in the landscape, integrating
existing knowledge with newer techniques (like social listening) to give our
clients a complete and accurate picture of the customer journey.

Top 3 Trends in Mobile Surveys

By: Aaron Jue,
FocusVision
Each year, we analyze the millions of surveys hosted on our
online survey platform, Decipher, to get insights into respondent survey-taking
behaviors and investigate the latest mobile survey trends including these three
key trends market researchers need to know.
Trend #1: Online survey starts from smartphone devices continue to grow
Mobile devices represent close to 30% of all survey starts
(Figure 1). The mobile growth trend in online surveys follows the overall
global trend of device usage. Industry analysts forecast smartphone
subscriptions from 2015 will double to 6.4 billion worldwide by 2021.[1]
As smartphones increasingly replace the PC for primary
internet usage, we expect that the population of smartphone survey takers will
follow the same trend.
Trend
#2: Mobile friendly surveys = improved participation rates
Mobile survey participation rates have steadily improved
while participation rates for desktop users have remained stable.
This reflects Decipher client projects which, over the
years, have increasingly deployed mobile friendly surveys.  We’re constantly discussing best survey design
practices for mobile devices and these have been tested and put to good
use.  By default all surveys hosted on
the Decipher platform employ a responsive survey design with options for many
dynamic and mobile friendly question types (e.g. card sort,  buttons).
Researchers are adjusting to the needs of the growing usage
for mobile devices, and survey designs have gotten better and smarter.
Trend #3: Mobile penetration depends on sample source
The level of mobile participation for a given survey depends
on the sample characteristics. It is known, for instance that in the US,
minority groups, youths, and upper income individuals show higher incidence of
smartphone use.[2]
Whether a survey employs panel sample or client supplied
sample (e.g. list of customers) has a tremendous impact as well.When a
client-supplied list is used, more than a quarter of respondents access the
survey using a smartphone; that number falls to 10% for panel respondents
(Figure 2).
Panel supplied sample has always had far fewer smartphone
survey takers.  We suspect that’s because
this population expects to receive surveys, and will use a PC out of habit or
for the better survey-user experience (i.e. larger screen size, mouse /
keyboard input). But the number of mobile panel members is growing and has more
than doubled since 2013.  Besides the
increasing reliance on smartphone devices to access the internet,  the growing industry acceptance and
deployment of smartphone friendly survey designs are undoubtedly driving this
trend.
Things Market
Researchers MUST Consider in 2016
As the mobile population continue to grow, it’s becoming
increasingly clear that researchers must adhere to mobile friendly principles
for online surveys. We can no longer simply resize surveys designed for the PC
and serve them on a smartphone without any regard for the smaller screen. It
leaves respondents frustrated with tiny text, input buttons, or horizontal
scales partially cut off from view. A survey that is friendly and optimized
across all platforms drives better data and higher respondent participation.
About Aaron Jue, FocusVision Market Research Director
With more than 10
years of full-service online survey knowledge and research, Aaron keeps
FocusVision at the forefront of new market research trends and best survey
design practices to maximize response rates and data quality. His role is to
capture key internal business performance metrics and FV customer insights.

[1]

http://www.ericsson.com/res/docs/2015/mobility-report/ericsson-mobility-report-nov-2015.pdf

[2]

http://www.pewinternet.org/files/2015/03/PI_Smartphones_0401151.pdf

This Week In Market Research: 6/29/15 – 7/3/15

Cannes Lions 2015 Social Insights: The top tweets and trends from this year

The Blessing And The Curse Of Big Data: It’s what infrastructure is really for

Gut Check: Are You Using Social Media For Consumer Insights?

Subway Sinks Teeth Into New Marketing Campaign: SMS mobile campaign for local and national from a s single platform

6 Strategies For Marketing Your Retail Business Online

Can Big Data Survive Big Brother Hysteria? Highlighting privacy concerns

Mobile Marketing Trends Dominating 2015: 9 Trends from video ads to tracking ROI

How A $0 Marketing Budget Bought A Fortune In Athlete Endorsements: Mizzen and Main’s story

When To Cut Your Losses On A Marketing Campaign: Marketing is equal parts science and art

Social Listening Hampered By Sentiment Models: An imperfect practice

About the Author:
Ryan Polachi is a contributing
writer concentrating his focus on Marketing, Finance and Innovation. He can be
reached at rpolachi@IIRUSA.com.

This Week In Market Research: 4/27/15 – 5/1/15

Using Big Data In A Crisis: Helping find missing persons in the Nepal Earthquake

Should We Be Storytelling or Story Making? Make the brand story part of the experience

How Big Data Has Changed Sports: 97% of MLB teams employ analytics professionals and 80% of NBA teams do as well

Creating Better Digital Marketing: 4 Strategies to tackle engagement

8 Mobile Marketing Tips You Don’t Want To Miss

Winning And Monetizing Users: Optimizing experiences in gaming

Embracing Technology: What marketing chiefs can do

Effective Social Sales Content: Clickable assets and visual enhancers

Generating Leads With Mobile Marketing: Master the basics before moving forward

Building Customer Loyalty In A Programmatic World: Following the journey of building loyalty

About the Author:
Ryan Polachi is a contributing
writer concentrating his focus on Marketing, Finance and Innovation. He can be
reached at rpolachi@IIRUSA.com.

Desktop to Wrist Watch Surveys: The Future of Market Research

When was the last time you recall sitting at your computer with leisure time to Web search as you please? Between commuting, longer days at work, squeezing in that workout, and finally eating, it is becoming very uncommon for one to find time to sit down at a computer and search the Internet. Minimal leisure Internet time therefore makes reaching potential online survey panelists even more tough to reach.
How is this impacting the data collected from online market research? For traditional online surveys, it seems it is becoming harder and harder to reach preferred data numbers let alone certain target groups. Where does this lead us to and how can we overcome this obstacle?
The most obvious and trending answer brings us to mobile. Allowing users to take abbreviated, reformatted surveys via mobile device is one way to increase sample size and reach what was traditionally called the ‘general population.’ Making the survey-taking experience simplified, convenient, and ready for today’s constant on-the-go consumers will drastically change the current problem of unreachable respondents. In addition to reaching more consumers, mobile has numerous advantages over traditional desktop online surveys. Take, for instance, geolocation capabilities which allow for tailoring of surveys according to the respondent’s location. Or in-store research, allowing customers to actually be in store making tradeoffs and purchases to evaluate choices in the environment we try to replicate online. Qualitative research can be enhanced with mobile devices, allowing respondents to video their shopping experience and take images.
Similarly, smart eyewear has recently come into play within the market research realm. Allowing for even more consumer behavior analysis, this technology will play a large roll in qualitative research in the years to come. Voice capabilities, eye-tracking, geolocation, you name it- these weapons of market research will change the industry!
Both of these alternatives have been discovered and are currently being explored for use. What options could 2015 bring? I believe the visual options have advanced far enough and we now must turn to understanding consumer behavior from a psychological standpoint. How can we measure what consumers really are thinking and understand this down to a neurological level. How does this then interplay with rational vs. emotional decision making models and how can we use this to influence consumers? Will the next generation eyewear include on the fly brain scans? Will the smart watch measure circulating neurotransmitters and predict choice behavior?
Changing times come with changing measures. To remain relevant we must approach this development with open arms and continue to keep looking forward!
Janel Parker, Market Research Consultant at SKIM, an international consultancy and marketing research agency, has a background in Marketing and Psychology from Cornell University. Her previous experience at a social media agency combined with her knowledge from SKIM provide for a unique understanding of the relationships between social media and marketing. She can be reached at j.parker@skimgroup.com.

Desktop to Wrist Watch Surveys: The Future of Market Research

When was the last time you recall sitting at your computer
with leisure time to web search as you please? Between commuting, longer days
at work, squeezing in that workout, and finally eating. It is becoming very
uncommon for one to find time to sit down at a computer and search the
internet. Minimal leisure Internet time therefore makes reaching potential
online survey panelists even more tough to reach.
How is this impacting the data collected from online market
research? For traditional online surveys, it seems it is becoming harder and
harder to reach preferred data numbers let alone certain target groups. Where
does this lead us to and how can we overcome this obstacle?
The most obvious and trending answer brings us to mobile.
Allowing users to take abbreviated, reformatted surveys via mobile device is
one way to increase sample size and reach what was traditionally called the
‘general population.’ Making the survey-taking experience simplified,
convenient, and ready for today’s constant on-the-go consumers will drastically
change
the current problem of unreachable respondents. In addition to
reaching more consumers, mobile has numerous advantages over traditional
desktop online surveys. Take, for instance, geolocation capabilities which
allow for tailoring of surveys according to the respondent’s location. Or
in-store research, allowing customers to actually be in store making tradeoffs
and purchases to evaluate choices in the environment we try to replicate
online. Qualitative research can be enhanced with mobile devices, allowing
respondents to video their shopping experience and take images.
Similarly, smart eyewear has recently come into play within
the market research realm. Allowing for even more consumer behavior analysis,
this technology will play a large roll in qualitative research in the years to
come. Voice capabilities, eye-tracking, geolocation, you name it- these weapons
of market research will change the industry!
Both of these alternatives have been discovered and are
currently being explored for use. What options could 2015
bring? I believe the visual options have advanced far enough and we now must
turn to understanding consumer behavior from a psychological standpoint. How
can we measure what consumers really are thinking and understand this down to a
neurological level. How does this then interplay with rational vs. emotional
decision making models and how can we use this to influence consumers? Will the
next generation eyewear include on the fly brain scans? Will the smart watch measure
circulating neurotransmitters and predict choice behavior?
Changing times come with changing measures. To remain
relevant we must approach this development with open arms and continue to keep
looking forward
!
Janel Parker, Market
Research Consultant at SKIM, an international consultancy and marketing
research agency, has a background in Marketing and Psychology from Cornell
University. Her previous experience at a social media agency combined with her
knowledge from SKIM provide for a unique understanding of the relationships
between social media and marketing. She can be reached at
j.parker@skimgroup.com.

Technology Takes Toll on Consumer Psyche

By Marc Dresner, IIR
Last week at my nephew’s Little League game I saw two
pedestrians nearly collide in the adjacent park.
Neither of them was watching where they were going because
they were engrossed in their mobiles. (One of them was pushing a stroller. Not
relevant. I just found it amusing.)
The incident reminded me of an anecdote consumer
psychologist and author Kit Yarrow shared at a speech I attended awhile back:
She compared browsing the Farmer’s Market to riding the bumper cars at an
amusement park.
Comical, irritating, a bit sad, perhaps, nonetheless our fixation
with our devices seems harmless enough.
Kit Yarrow
But Yarrow, a Golden Gate University professor and author of
Decoding the New Consumer Mind: How We Shop and Buy,’ thinks otherwise.
Yarrow says the increasing mediation of rapidly advancing technology
in our lives is having a deep and profound psychological impact on people.
It’s not about what we’re doing with technology, she notes,
but what technology is doing to us.
People today think
differently
‘People today think
differently,’ Yarrow said.
Specifically, our attention spans are shorter, we’re less
focused but we’re more adept multitaskers, and we require an increasingly
higher level of novelty and stimulation.
Our brains, Yarrow said, are also being programmed to perceive
better visually and to prefer ‘visual snippets.’
This explains why photo links receive 85% more clicks than
text and why Pinterest ‘pins’ are 100 times more viral than tweets, she noted.
What’s more, Yarrow says our increasing penchant for visuals
lends itself to heuristics we use to make decisions.
Accordingly, images, symbols, and even colors have
unprecedented communication potency. For example, waitresses wearing red
receive 16-24% higher tips from men.
Technology has also made us more autonomous, but left us
feeling more isolated.
We’re more ‘connected’ than ever, we
don’t ‘connect’
Yarrow points out that although we’re more ‘connected’ than
ever, we don’t ‘connect’ with people they way we did in the past.

We may have more ‘friends’ thanks to social media, but the
nature and quality of our relationships and interactions with people, by and
large, have suffered as a result of technological mediation.
For example, more and more of our communication occurs digitally
and not face-to-face today. The former, a pretty recent development, is
displacing the preferred mode of human communication for thousands of years!
We don’t even use our phones to talk as much anymore; we
use them to text one another.
Consider the implications when as much as 93% of face-to-face
communication may be non-verbal (body language and vocal intonation).
What is being lost and how is it affecting us?
‘We are responding to shifts with our limbic brain
that we don’t understand.’
‘We are responding to shifts with our limbic brain that we
don’t understand,’ Yarrow said.
Something as seemingly insignificant as a dearth of eye contact
engenders feelings of rejection and invisibility, which Yarrow says has among
other things contributed to a rise in disrespectful, rude and rancorous
behavior.
So, the fact that our heads are always glued to our devices isn’t
just causing us to occasionally bump into one another; it’s actually affecting how
we are socialized.
‘We’ve had the same
basic human needs since caveman days’the need to belong to a community for
safety, security and procreation, the need to love and be loved, the need to
have a purpose in life, etc.,’ Yarrow explained.
‘But as the world has changed, the ways we go about getting
those needs satisfied has also changed. Our brains are malleable. Our
psychology adjusts,’ she said.
‘Our brains are malleable. Our psychology adjusts.’
Due to a variety of factors’uncertainty, the pace of change,
lack of a sense of ‘tribal security,’ etc.’Yarrow says our collective anxiety
as a society is up.
‘We’re in a near state of fight-or-flight. We act like a
bear is chasing us,’ she said.
And trust has been declining precipitously with each
generation. Yarrow noted Gen Y is particularly wary and guarded.
The net of these intertwined shifts, according to Yarrow:
- We have powerful new cravings
for human connection.
- We acquire perceptions, process
information and make decisions in new ways.
- Trust disappointments color
everything.

There are, of course, marketing implications here, but I’ve got research on the brain.

I cannot help
but wonder how what we’ll see and hear at The Market Research Event next week ‘techniques, innovations,
insights’will exploit and/or address these trends.

Looking forward to seeing you in Boca Raton!

ABOUT THE AUTHOR/INTERVIEWER
Marc Dresner is IIR USA’s sr. editor and special communication project lead. He is the former executive editor of Research Business Report, a confidential newsletter for the marketing research and consumer insights industry. He may be reached at mdresner@iirusa.com. Follow him @mdrezz.

Part 2: The Endless Possibilities of Mobile Market Research

In part 1 of “The Endless Possibilities of Mobile Market Research” we examined how a mobile device is in essence a miniature, mobilized focus group facility with GPS enabled capabilities that offers endless iterations of how mobile research can be conducted. In part 2, we will examine the methodology of an actual Mobile Market Research tracking case study that was recently presented at the 2014 Future of Consumer Intelligence conference (#FOCI14).

The case began with Jim Kohl, Director of Consumer Insights at the Career Education Corportation (CEC), a postsecondary education provider with campus-based and online curricula. Over the past several years Kohl has conducted an internal “Voice of the Customer” research project and found that his students had a great online educational experience, although their online research experience was subpar. Additionally, as CEC moved forward with a tracking study, Kohl was concerned if conducting a sole online/mobile research study would be representative of his student populous. One of Kohl’s main objectives was to insure the insights were indicative of their customer base.

Jim Kohl, Director of Consumer Insights, Career Education Corportation

In an effort to address these issues, Kohl partnered with Added Value, a full service Top 50 Honomichl research company. At FOCI14 both Brian Kushnir, EVP, Managing Director & Wai Leng Loh, VP of Added Value presented 3 key sampling and methodological takeaways from CEC’s current online/mobile tracking study:
First, KNOW THY SAMPLE.
Members of the mobile and online world who were sampled for the tracking study were indicative of students who utilized CEC’s services in terms of demographics and online behavior. Therefore, the online/mobile tracking study was based on a representative sample that did not exclude core customers and any insights derived from the tracking study would provide an accurate reflection of their target audience’s opinions. Interestingly, the in-progress study found the demographics of iPhone users tend to skew slighter higher than Android users (higher income, higher age).

Wai Leng Loh, VP & Brian Kushnir, EVP of Added Value

Second, BE DESIGN AGNOSTIC.

Survey takers should be able to seamlessly participate in surveys, anywhere, anytime, regardless of platform (online, smartphone, tablet, etc.)

Third, LET IT GO.

As researchers, we often like to ask tons and tons of questions, in order to gather as much data as possible, so that our results “stick”. However, new evidence suggests mobile device users are more engaged with their devices and consequently, less willing to spend as much time taking surveys on their devices. As such, we as researchers need to “Let It Go” when we conduct mobile research by: (1) shortening the length of survey questions, (2) limiting buttons and images within the survey, and (3) reducing survey questions to basic common denominator questions within select categories.

In other words, a traditional survey will suffice in the online world. However, with mobile, the same survey should be streamlined and broken down to basic elements in order to enhance completion rates while keeping both the online and mobile portion of the study intact.

Online vs. Mobile Survey Design

Case in point: although CEC’s study is still in the field, the aforementioned mobile research methodology has enhanced the user experience and improved completion rates. It will be interesting to see the final results of the online/mobile tracking study as it moves forward.

Chris Ruby is an award-winning Marketing Research & Consumer Insights Executive with Fortune 500 consulting experience. His niche is the ability to turn complex data into compelling stories that induce a call for action among key decision-makers. His work has been featured by MRA, MRIA, IIR, Norstat Times, Chadwick Martin Bailey & the Optimization Group. Keep up with Chris Ruby by following him on Twitter @ChrisRubyMRX or by reading the Chris Ruby Market Research Blog.

Live from #MediaInsight: Marketing Across Screens

Cortney Henseler, Director, Consumer Analytics & Research, AOL provides a look at how mobile devices impact media consumption 

Mobile device users are looking for deep experiences – they want to continue where they left off when using different devices, and want to be sure that their digital experience is the same no matter where they are.

Mobile moments are driven by “me time,” a desire for amusement and relaxation.

When it comes to tablet use, shopping and consumption of entertainment see a major increase – these are the activities that drive tablet usage for many consumers.  

In a game asking consumers to “vote devices off the island,” mobile phones and computers win out – beating both tablets and TV.  Interestingly, 1/3 of consumers use a computer ONLY to access their favorite website.  Computers also take the top spot when it comes to driving desire to consume content on the web.  

In a qualitative deprivation exercise, taking a smartphone away from consumers resulted in a sense of complete disconnection – while they can get by without a tablet, the lack of a smartphone is almost unthinkable.  

People aged 35+ are more likely to value tablets when it comes to consuming web content – the intuitive interface and bigger screen size are among the factors that make these devices appealing to the 35+ crowd.  

Tablet usage spikes during primetime – 7 to 10PM is a time when people are multi-tasking by using a tablet while watching TV (with web browsing emerging as the top tablet activity).  

Cooking/food is the top category for cross-screen synergy – people want to use multiple devices to access this content, and do so frequently.  

In terms of ad recall, the computer provides nearly twice the value of mobile devices.  Some tips for advertisers include:
1. consumer learning curve
2. relevance
3. elements add interest
4. message clarity

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Ben Proctor is Insights Strategist at Miner & Co. Studio, a New York-based consultancy

Infographic: How the future will shape TV watching

This infographic looks at “how the future will shape TV watching for the modern user, the tv of tomorrow and the living room of the future.” via visual.ly and gui.de

The tv of tomorrow and the living room of the future
by beutlerink.
Explore more infographics like this one on the web’s largest information design community – Visually.