Tag Archives: millennial

Introducing the TMRE On Demand Webinar Series!

Introducing the TMRE On Demand Webinar
Series!

TMRE ON DEMAND
As insights leaders, we are
constantly tasked with evolving our skill sets and staying on top of the latest
MR trends.
The producers of TMRE: The Market
Research event are excited to announce that we’ll be delivering the
cutting-edge content and speakers to keep you informed year-round. The TMRE
webinar series takes you beyond the in-person event, and is designed for executives
with a relentless focus on securing the future of insights as a powerful force
for business success. Each quarter, the TMRE Webinar series delivers a 3-part
webinar experience designed to empower insights executives with the latest
information around hot topics to ensure insights drives bottom line impact.
Schedule of WEBINARS:
STORYTELLING WITH DATA
Wednesday, May 24, 2017 ‘ 2:00 ‘ 3:30 PM EST
Driving the
value of insights forward requires much more than just unearthing great data.
You need to use that data to tell a story and command influence across the
broader organization. Because storytelling may not be an inherent skill, this
3-part webinar focuses on how to use data to create an engaging, informative, compelling story. 
               
THE NEED FOR SPEED: BALANCING SPEED OF
INSIGHT WITH QUALITY OF INSIGHTS
Wednesday, August 16, 2017 – 2:00 – 3:30 PM
EST
There is a constant tug of war within
insights and research departments. Your internal end-users want things done
quickly and cheaply. While career market researches want to ensure they are
using the savviest tools and techniques, and not just will get the job done
first. This 3-part webinar focuses on how to balance speed and quality.
DEMYSTIFYING THE MILLENNIAL MINDSET
Wednesday, November 15, 2017 ‘ 2:00 ‘ 3:30 PM
EST
Millennials are currently the
largest purchasing base, but remain one of the biggest mysteries for companies
looking to understand the ‘why’ behind their actions and anticipate future
needs. This 3-part webinar focuses on MR in the on-demand mindset and generate
impactful insights that create brands/products around a purpose that speaks to
millennials.

Whole Foods Focuses on Fickle Millennials

‘I wish I could afford to buy good organic produce whilst
still being able to pay off my student loans.’ This is something I, as a
millennial, say to myself every time I go to do my weekly food shop. Millennials
like myself have become the focus for many retail industries due to the huge
potential that they provide and Whole Foods are looking to take advantage.
Whole Foods Market recently announced their plans to launch
a new store that is targeted specifically to millennials. The new stores, that
are yet to be named, will be complimentary to the existing Whole Foods Markets
but will provide a more limited array of foods at cheaper prices in order to
cater for the beliefs and needs of the millennial generation.
Millennials are notorious for being difficult to please;
they demand the best yet at low cost. Millennials being the highest users of
social media have been brought up using the internet to discern the best value
products by trawling reviews and forums. However when it comes to food, most
good standard products do not differ a huge amount in price. I know from
personal experience, that most of the time if I want cheap produce, I have to
take a hit in terms of quality.
Though millennials are commonly associated as being far more
concerned about ethical issues behind organic produce, the ‘boomer’ generation
account for a far higher percentage of purchasers. Millennials at the moment
may be at the start of their careers, not earning as much as boomers whilst
paying off student debts. So Whole Foods Markets, Inc. creating smaller stores,
with high quality products for cheaper prices is surely a recipe for success
within the millennial generation. By setting up these stores in areas filling
up with young professionals they will harness a huge market of food values
driven people and could create loyalty in a notoriously disloyal demographic of
consumers.
The questions on my mind that arise from such an
announcement is whether consumers may ask ‘well surely Whole Foods have been
ripping us off if they can set lower prices at these new stores’? 
Could there
be a potential backlash that sees the main stores see a huge decline in
customers? This in turn could lead to a decline in bigger stores and an increase
in new smaller ones. Will this in turn mean Whole Foods ends as a small food
store to rival Trader Joes and other similar companies? If so, will these
rivals lower these prices and cause continuous price drops that could create
profit decline across the industry? This in turn to me could mean a decline in
profit for the farmers and original producers of the food and this is what the
millennials are associated with being concerned about.
Despite my negative questions, I do believe the new stores
will be a success. Cheaper produce in up and coming areas will definitely be
popular with millennials. There are potential roadblocks that should be
addressed in a proactive fashion in order to make sure the easily bored and
brand disloyal millennials grow up into a new boomer generation who stay with
Whole Foods Market, Inc.

About the Author:
Harry Kempe, a marketing intern at IIR USA, who works on various aspects of the
industry including social media, marketing analysis and media. He is a recent
graduate of Newcastle University who previously worked for EMAP Ltd. and WGSN as
a marketing assistant on events such as the World Architecture Festival, World
Retail Congress and Global Fashion Awards. He can be reached at hkempe@IIRUSA.com.   

Creating a Millennial-Friendly Customer Experience

Retailers today are striving to make sure that their companies provide a millennial-friendly customer experience. As a millennial myself, I have been fortunate enough to have grown up in a more advanced technological world where I, like many others in a similar age bracket, will have been more tech savvy than their parents by their early teens. Customer experience for millennials has been molded by the increasing number of platforms available for retail and this creates opportunities and challenges for retailers.
Monitoring online social experiences are seen as a must for retail companies; consumers are often flocking to the web to look for answers to issues as well as contacting a call center or an online chat for information. The web has a huge number of forums and communities where consumers go to discuss products and are in my eyes a great resource for gaining first hand insights into exactly what customers want or think about products. Often, companies only monitor comments from customers on their own sites and may miss people’s comments from sites such as TripAdvisor or other discussion rooms.
Social media sites such as twitter are now becoming a popular resource for companies to talk to customers. According to Forbes, millennials take up 29 percent of the twitter-sphere and use the platform for commenting on purchases; leveraging the resource to monitor posts and often responding via twitter can give the customer a sense of being personally looked after rather than having to wait on hold whilst a customer representative at a call center keeps you on hold for three hours.
Giving the customer a more personalized feel is deemed another priority in giving a better customer experience. Repeating personal information that could have been retained by companies I find very irritating. Fundamental information such as contact information and home addresses I expect to be able to be seen across different platforms and having to re-input information could put customers off returning. Being able to access personal information and interests is key to giving a customer a comfortable and easy experience. Online retailers such as Amazon and ASOS retain previous purchase information or what has been searched for in order to give suggestions. I believe the next step would be to take that technique in store.
The world is becoming far more interconnected; so I believe creating systems that register a smartphone when a person has entered a store can bring up information of again past purchases so that a shop assistant would be able to give the customer a more personal experience.
Catering to the desires of the millennial generation could be a great opportunity to boost customer satisfaction. Other strategies could be being more engaged in price comparison or giving more of a story behind a product rather than just it being made for profit. TOMS shoes is a prime example, it helps the consumer appreciate the company for doing something to help rather than just making money. Millennials have grown up in a world where global issues such as poverty and climate change are often at the forefront of discussions; so creating a retail platform that goes beyond wanting to make an easy buck, for me and I’m sure many others, would be the difference in choosing between two retailers.
About the Author: Harry Kempe, a marketing intern at IIR USA, who works on various aspects of the industry including social media, marketing analysis and media. He is a recent graduate of Newcastle University who previously worked for EMAP Ltd. and WGSN as a marketing assistant on events such as the World Architecture Festival, World Retail Congress and Global Fashion Awards. He can be reached at hkempe@IIRUSA.com.

Millennials and Beauty: Serving the Eye of a New Generation of Beholders

According to a recent Future in Focus report, by 2017 the
Millennial generation, also known as Gen Y, is predicted to surpass the boomer generation
in spending power and become the most active spenders of the first half of the
21st century. The report dove into Millennial consumer behavior regarding
beauty, identifying and exploring attitudes and values that will shape their
purchasing patterns over the next decade.
Shaped by the digital age and the economic recession, this large
generation of 70 million in the U.S. has different priorities, shopping
behaviors, and attitudes from other generations. In fact, this always-connected
generation has concerns about their l finances that the older generation of
spenders did not at their age, and they are more ethnically and racially
diverse than any generation before them.  In fact, among adults age 18 to 29, just 61%
are Caucasian (compared to 70% of older adults), while 19% are Hispanic (vs.
13% of older adults), 14% African-American (vs. 11%), and 5% Asian. In
addition, Millennials are economically diverse’with one-third being lower
income, one-third middle income, and one-third upper income.
Millennials are the first to grow up with ubiquitous
information so they tend to have an affinity for the digital age and are always
connected. Five of six (83%) say they sleep with a mobile phone next to their
bed, compared to just 57% of all adults. They also use the Internet primarily
as a social tool, with 75% reporting having a profile on social media. And 80%
of younger Millennial social media users (i.e., 18 to 24 years old) connect
with their platforms several times a day. But this constant connection applies
to their consumer lives as well: 41% regularly use their phones to compare
prices while shopping, compared to just 26% of boomers.
This generation was hit hard by the Great Recession. As late
as 2012, 32% of Millennial shoppers reported having difficulty affording
groceries, compared to just 22% of the overall population. As a result, Gen Y
tends to be more frugal than older generations. In 2013, 22% of Millennials
(compared to just 17% of Xers and 14% of boomers) said they were putting more
money into savings during the previous year.  Still, Millennials have made beauty and
personal-care rituals part of their culture no matter the economic situation. They
are developing attitudes regarding beauty that will influence the products they
seek. Six of the most pervasive attitudes are beauty is a fun way to express
oneself; beauty is worth the expense; beauty is way more than skin deep; you’re
never too young for anti-aging; do-it-yourself beauty ; beauty is not just for
women and; beauty is a fun way to express oneself.
Image via Katie
Tegtmeyer (flickr)

Research by Mintel suggests that Millennial women associate
beauty with fun more than women of older generations. For instance, two out of
three 18- to 24-year-old women (65%) enjoy the ritual of putting on makeup’a
share nearly 50% higher than that of all women (45%). Nearly two in three Gen Y
women say they wear makeup every day, and nearly half (48%) say they spend more
than 10 minutes putting on makeup. In addition to having fun with it, most
Millennials see beauty care as another way to express themselves. More than two
in three women age 18 to 24 (69%) say they wear makeup that expresses their
personality, compared to just 55% of all women. Their ability to express
themselves through beauty may be part of the reason that almost all (94%) Gen Y
women say that makeup helps them feel more confident.
Millennials seem to think that enhancing their beauty is
worth the expense. In fact, they spend more than the average shopper on beauty
and personal care categories. Millennial shoppers spend over 25% more than
average US shoppers on such products as body scrubbers, shampoo, conditioner,
styling gels or mousses, and suntan products, and 20% more on cosmetics.  A significant majority (75%) of Millennial women
say they don’t mind spending money on makeup because it makes them feel good.
Additionally, unlike older generations, Millennials are more
attuned to skincare and anti-aging benefits at an early age. According to NPD,
39% of older Millennial women (those age 25 to 34) say that anti-aging is an
important benefit that they look for in skincare products. While younger
Millennials are often still dealing with acne, older Millennials are growing
aware that changes in their skin during early adulthood may mark the beginning
of an aging process.
But, Millennials take a more self-driven, DIY approach to
beauty care. Although influenced by their frugal nature, Millennials’
do-it-yourself approach to beauty may also be motivated by the fun they have
experimenting with new products. Millennials are twice as likely as the overall
population to embrace self-reliant, home-based beauty behaviors and at-home
beauty products.
Driven by social media and the increasing competitiveness of
the job market, Millennial men also think beauty matters too. They are putting
a greater emphasis than older generations did on looking and dressing their
best, which involves both fashion and grooming. In 2013, more than three in
four men (76%) said that the pressure on men to dress well and be well groomed
had increased. Nearly as many (73%) think that men now face as much pressure in
these respects as women do. For Millennial men, grooming is increasingly seen
as a component of healthy living, like exercise and eating well.  
From beauty companies’ point of view, Millennials are at a
critical stage in their lives. Millennials are establishing beauty and skincare
habits and consumer patterns that are likely to persist throughout their
lifetime. So, the companies and brands that win Gen Y consumers are likely to
retain these consumers for the long term.  

To read the full
report,
click here.

About the Author:
Amanda Ciccatelli, Social Media Strategist of the Marketing Division at IIR USA, has a background in digital and
print journalism, covering a variety of topics in business strategy, marketing,
and technology. Amanda is the Editor at Large for several of IIR’s blogs
including Next Big DesignCustomers 1stDigital Impact, STEAM Accelerator and ProjectWorld and World Congress for Business
Analysts
, and a regular contributor to Front End of Innovation and The Market Research Event,.
She previously worked at Technology Marketing Corporation as a Web Editor where
she covered breaking news and feature stories in the technology industry. She
can be reached at aciccatelli@iirusa.com. Follow her at @AmandaCicc.

Live from #TMRE14: Food Futures: A Portrait of the Food Connected Generation

Being a prolific foodie, which I learned was a word with negative connotations, I was pleased to attend the Food Network and Cooking Channel VP talk about millennials from Gabe Gordon.

Talking about an interesting juxtaposition of millennials, who don’t inherently watched TV, connect with shows, celebrities and reality television. The joy of cooking is an analog and senatorial experience in the digital world for the younger generation. The joy of cooking has grown exponentially over time, as well as just the need to consume more interesting food.

In terms of drivers, Facebook remains the key driver of conversations on food, as does Pinterest for repeat sharing, ideas and inspiration. Suprisingly, a social media addict’s favorite Instagram falls to the bottom of the pack.

Some interesting factoids include

  • Consumers are hungrier – 70% of people are finding food more important than 4 years ago!
  • Roughly half of food connectors are millennials, and half of those are me. Men have a deeper relationship with food than millennial women
  • 90% of women think a man that cooks is a turn on. 77% of men find cooking makes them feel good about themselves.

Probably one of the most disturbing thoughts was that millennials like their parents and GenX don’t, which is why the family phenomenon and the learning from parents is coming back as a saving behavior via food.

Sourabh Sharma,
Communication & Social Media Research Expert at SKIM, an international
consultancy and marketing research agency, has a background in engineering,
marketing and finance from the University of Pennsylvania, and the Wharton
School and Rotterdam School of Management. Having worked in marketing and
product development at L’Oreal, followed by a stint in management consulting,
he now passionately enjoys the world of social media, and can be found on every
platform with his alias sssourabh. He is a food critic and a fashion writer,
and documents these alongside strategy on his blog called
3FS. He may be reached at s.sharma@skimgroup.com.
Follow him on
@sssourabh.

TMRE 2013 Video Released: Creating Pivot TV: Developing A Media Model Designed to Activate Millennials

Karen Ramspacher of Participant Media discusses the formation of Pivot TV in this presentation from the Market Research Event. She discusses the three different approaches they took which were quantifying, examining the cultural, and experiential. Millennials are 85 million strong and are often given a bad rap. They also believe they can do anything.

Sign for full access to this video presentation from The Market Research Event

Quantifying:

A survey was conducted with 3100 respondents and they found that 64% were open to the idea of creating social change. This translates to 27 million millennials that they sorted into three groups or stages. The first is the “allies” which are skewed female and enjoy the entertainment value. The second is the “clicktivists” who are skewed male and take online action. The third is the “new heroes” which was the majority and they are engaged and willing to make a change.

Cultural:

A brand lives in an area where the marketing, content, and culture overlap.Millennials live in a post collapse culture and and seek role models because they don’t trust anyone. They are also a positive generation and are willing to clean up the mess even though they didn’t make it.

Experiential:

The quest to get millennials was proven to be a difficult one. They have so many pressures and so many choices that it make it a bleak world for them. The caring and doing spectrum covers the amount someone cares and how likely they will act on someone. Using this and interviews with millennials, they found that millennials want to be challenged and believe that companies that do good things are important.

Creating a brand filter was important to Pivot TV and they need to be disruptive, credible, and brave. The mission for Pivot TV was to create social change.

Watch the video here.

About the Author:

Ryan Polachi is a contributing
writer concentrating his focus on Marketing, Finance and Innovation. He can be
reached at rpolachi@IIRUSA.com.

Visa Canada’s Head of Mobile Talks Canadian Shopper Culture

Not long ago we may have been able to argue that retailers
thought that Big Data was just a bunch of hype that didn’t actually lead to
better returns, but we’ve come a long way since then. In fact, a recent survey
reveals that 73 percent of retailers consider shopper insights to be very important or
essential to the performance of the departments in which they work. In addition,
76 percent think leveraging insights is important to the performance of the
company as a whole.
I recently caught up with speaker Derek Colfer, Head of Mobile at Visa
Canada and speaker at the upcoming Consumer Insights Canada conference in Toronto, to discuss how Canada’s shopper culture is unique to the rest of North
America.
Here’s what Colfer had to say:
IIR: What
makes insights ‘strategic insights’?
Colfer: I
think all insights are strategic; however it’s their application to a specific
opportunity that makes them meaningful and impactful.
IIR: What is
the key to using the power of consumer insights to make smarter decisions in
business?
Colfer: Consumer
insights can help businesses evaluate the success of current products and are
especially important when entering the product development lifecycle. The gaps
in between product awareness, intent and usage can help businesses understand
the needs of their customers. Visa recently utilized consumer insights with the
design of Visa Checkout, a payment service that enables consumers to pay for
goods on any device with just a few clicks. We know consumers are using their
phones for more these days but that mCommerce can be onerous on small devices,
leading to low conversion rates from cart to checkout. With Visa Checkout, we
addressed issues like too many fields of information in the checkout process
and big thumbs on small screens to ensure an easier online shopping experience.
IIR: How are
shopper insights unique in Canada compared to the rest of North America?
Colfer: Canadian
shoppers are savvy with a very high propensity for loyalty. A 2014 Maritz (Bond
Brand Loyalty) report found that 90 percent of Canadians are members of at
least one loyalty rewards program. We have also quickly embraced online
shopping and have a high penetration of mobile usage. Almost 80 percent of
Canada’s addressable population owns a mobile phone, according to a 2014
eMarketer report. These factors, along with companies like Starbucks and Tim
Hortons who have tied loyalty to mobile payments, are helping to drive Canadian
comfort levels with mobile payment adoption.
IIR: Where
do you see the shopper culture in Canada five years from now?
Colfer: Canadians
will continue to use their mobile devices in a hyper accelerated manner. What
we refer to as eCommerce today will become more of an omni-commerce experience,
blurring the lines between various channels (in-store, desktop, laptop, tablet,
mobile device, wearables, etc’) as consumers use more than one channel and form
factor to search, compare, apply loyalty and purchase. 
Image via
www.fortune3.com

IIR: What’s your advice on effective ways to reach
Canadians on the path-to-purchase?
Colfer: There are
various technologies available for businesses to engage and interact directly
with their customers on more than one device throughout any given day. One
challenge for merchants is to ensure content and offerings are universally
available across all channels so that consumers can shop in the channel that
best suits their purchasing patterns.
IIR: What’s
the best part about shopping in Canada?
Colfer: Canadians
are incredibly loyal and the Canadian brands and merchants that we frequent
tend to reward loyalty in a very innovative manner. The most notable recent
example is the CIBC Tim Hortons Double Double Visa Card with a pioneering
two-button technology that enables users to switch between paying with their
Visa card with built-in loyalty, and the redemption of their earned Tim Cash
rewards. I think we’re going to see a lot more of this type of innovation and
loyalty tied to apps as we move forward and it’s going to positively impact
Canadian adoption of mobile payments.
IIR: How is
technology empowering the always-on shopper today?
Colfer: Technology
is incredibly empowering for Canadian consumers. It’s not uncommon to see a
consumer take out their mobile device, open up an app and scan a barcode on a
product in-store. That mobile app can provide access to an array of product
reviews and ratings and it can also drive the consumer to make a purchase
in-store with a profile driven incentive. Conversely, that same app can prompt
a consumer to leave that particular store and purchase the product online or in
a competing merchant down the street. Consumers remain at the center of the
commerce lifecycle, however technology is empowering them today in ways we
could not have imagined five years ago.
IIR: How do
you embed a culture of customer experience at Visa Canada?
Colfer: Every
digital product we build and put in market has been built with the lens of a
consumer. 
Visa’s aforementioned Visa Checkout is a great example of this, and
so is Visa payWave. Visa payWave allows a consumer to wave their card in front
of a payment terminal to securely and quickly make payment, reducing time in
line and at the cashier, improving the point-of-sale experience. This same
technology provides the foundation for NFC mobile payment apps, which are
gaining popularity in Canada and are available to consumers through Visa
issuers like TD, CIBC, RBC, Scotiabank and Desjardins. Our Vision at Visa, to
be the best way to pay and be paid for everyone, everywhere, prioritizes
consumer behaviour and drives every product innovation.
IIR: What
have you learned about Millennial shopper insights in Canada working at Visa?
Colfer: Millennials
are early adopters of technology and are an important segment to consider in
mobile payment adoption. According to a 2013 eMarketer report on age-based
digital behaviour, Millennials are the prime demographic for digital adoption
as they were born and raised during the emergence of the internet with an 80
percent adoption of mobile.
However, while Millennials are an important segment to
consider with regards to mCommerce and mPOS, there are also other demographics
with interesting behaviours that shouldn’t be forgotten. Gen X’ers lead all
other age brackets in ecommerce purchases for family staples and are the most
likely to transact on tablets and smartphones, according to an Ipsos Reid study
cited in the same eMarketer report, and Baby Boomers have shown the strongest
interest in loyalty programs. Sometimes I think we put too much focus on the
current consumer insight trend rather than being strategic with more than one
group.
IIR: How do
you see mobile affecting the future shopper in Canada?
Colfer: Canada is
already very advanced in contactless payments, but NFC payments will become far
more ubiquitous. Visa was the first payment network in Canada to pilot NFC in
2010 and we were the first payment network to commercially deploy with CIBC
back in 2012. To date, TD, CIBC, RBC, Scotiabank and Desjardins all offer
various NFC mobile payments to their clients that run through the Visa Network,
providing Canadian consumers with many accessible options.
Canadians love their mobile devices and I think they will
become more comfortable using them in-store to make purchases quickly and
securely. New technologies like Host Card Emulation (HCE), where consumer data
is secured in a cloud, will help to increase consumer usage. Visa’s new cloud
based payment specifications allow our banks to offer the same
interoperability, scalability and security to consumer’s phones that they trust
with plastic cards today.
If you’d like to hear
more from Derek, don’t miss him present at Consumer Insights Canada. The
event is taking place this September 29-October 1, 2014 in Toronto,
Canada. For more information about the event and to register, click here: http://bit.ly/XPjI56

About the Author:
Amanda Ciccatelli, Social Media Strategist of the Marketing Division at IIR USA, has a background in digital and
print journalism, covering a variety of topics in business strategy, marketing,
and technology. Amanda is the Editor at Large for several of IIR’s blogs
including Next Big DesignCustomers 1stDigital Impact, STEAM Accelerator and ProjectWorld and World Congress for Business
Analysts
, and a regular contributor to Front End of Innovation and The Market Research Event,.
She previously worked at Technology Marketing Corporation as a Web Editor where
she covered breaking news and feature stories in the technology industry. She
can be reached at aciccatelli@iirusa.com. Follow her at @AmandaCicc. 

Study: Millennials to Shake Up Corporate America

Did you know that by the year 2020, Millennials, the generation
born between 1982 and 2003 and who helped twice elect President Obama,
will comprise more than one of three adult Americans. In fact, it is estimated
that by 2025 they will make up as much as 75 percent of the workforce.  So,
understanding this generation’s values creates a window into the future of
corporate America.
New survey data suggest that
Millennials
are as liberal in their corporate outlook as they are in their
political view. They want to work for companies with public service missions,
they want their employers to contribute to social and ethical causes, and they’d
rather make less money but do something that they love.
This data paints a contrast to older generations, according
to the authors of a new study, who argue that Millennials have such liberal views
about social responsibility, personal wealth and financial institutions that
they stand to reorder the priorities of corporate America. This study was
written by two men who have long studied this generation: Morley Winograd,
a senior fellow at the University of Southern California’s Annenberg
School Center on Communication and Leadership Policy, and Michael Hais, a
former vice president for entertainment research at Frank N. Magid
Associates.
‘As Millennials become an increasingly large share of the
adult population and gather more and more wealth, the generation’s size and
unity of belief will cause seismic shifts in the nation’s financial sector,
shaking it to its very foundations and leading to major changes in the nation’s
board rooms,’ the authors wrote.

According to the study, a 2013 survey of high-achieving high
school students found young people most wanted to work at companies with public
service missions. Among those are health care companies such as St. Jude’s
Children’s Hospital, government agencies such as the FBI and the CIA, and
private employers ‘whose mission is to change the world for the better.’
Additionally, a 2012 survey of insurance company employees found 63% of
Millennials want their employer to contribute to social or ethical causes, vs.
about half of Baby Boomers and older Generation Xers.
Further, an Intelligence Group survey found 64
percent of Millennials would rather make $40,000 per year at a job they love
than $100,000 a year at a jot they think is boring. The average investor ages
21 to 36 has about half his or her savings in cash, compared to 23 percent for
other age groups, according to an analysis by UBS Wealth Management in
the Americas. It described Millennials as ‘the most conservative generation since
the Great Depression.’
He said, ‘There is a great deal of survey research that
suggests the conventional wisdom ‘ that young people are liberal when they are
young but grow more conservative as they age, is simply wrong. People form
lifelong beliefs about how the world works between the ages of 17-25, and once
formed, they rarely change.’

Mastering the Digital & Social Marketplace

To call this an event is an understatement. The annual The Total Customer Experience Leaders 2014 is a meeting of the minds for those folks dedicated to advancing business relevancy through customer strategy. This salon style event facilitates the exchange of higher level dialogues and access to the greatest strategists of our time. It’s where provocation is grounded in actionability and presented through articulate facilitation. The 2014 event has a specialized focus on today’s digital & social marketplace. 
April 9-11, 2014
Trump International Beach Resort
Miami, Florida
Our distinguished speakers include:

How Current Trends are Shaping the 10 Growth Areas of Tomorrow
KEYNOTE: Jared Weiner, Futurist and Vice President, Weiner, Edrich, Brown
Several emerging consumer trends for 2014… and beyond…are revolutionizing the future of customer engagement. This session will focus on how major technological, social and economic trends are shaping the 10 growth areas of the emerging Metaspace Economy. Together, we will take a quick journey into the short – and long-term future to uncover the growth opportunities of tomorrow for businesses. Jared brings his experience as a futurist working with some of the world’s largest companies to the table and observes how the economy is evolving to put more of a premium on customer experience than ever before.

Move Brands Faster and Longer in the Social Media Era
Nestor Portillo, Director, Social Communities and Customer Experience, Microsoft

With new social media networks/platforms emerging almost every day, how can brands timely and efficiently engage customers while delivering a cohesive experience that drives customer loyalty? This presentation shares Microsoft’s strategy of serving +22 million customers per month through different social platforms (Blog, Forums, Wiki, Social) in 13 languages, and why customer experience is the key to making the content viral and engaging. What’s the trade-off between the social platform used, the level of trust and the cost when delivering a customer experience through your website and social channels? Customer experience involves customer service and support, how both can co-exists in today’s organizational model and how companies need to get prepared for the new wave?

Thriving in a Digital Commerce World
KEYNOTE: Jay Topper, CIO & CTO, VITACOST.COM

To succeed as a dotcom retailer, it isn’t enough to sell cheap and deliver on time. The entire end-to-end digital eco-system must constantly transform: From marketing, through the web experience, into fulfillment and post-sale services-consumer expectations are on the rise-and must be met in order to create the loyalty necessary to thrive.

How does technology both serve and lead transformation within marketing, merchandising and operations?
How have expectations in internet retail increased and what’s around the corner?
How does post-sale innovation contribute to life-time value-cracking the code of loyalty isn’t easy when your competitor is a click away
Mastering the Mindset of the Millennial Candidate
Kassandra Barnes, Research & Content Manager, CareerBuilder

The millennial generation is the first to grow up in a digital world. That’s why this new generation of candidates, who navigate the increasingly complex and fragmented digital environment with ease, is a challenge for many organizations. We’ll examine insights gleaned from years of studying candidate behavior online and discuss how organizations can use this new media environment to their advantage and personalize their experience with this ever-changing talent pool.

….and, many more industry leaders!

Download the brochure for the full agenda: http://bit.ly/1a4Ivai
Mention code TCEL14LI & Save 15% off the standard rate. Register today: http://bit.ly/1a4Ivai
The take away? A viable actionable plan to securing your company’s future success. Join other leaders charged with creating a sound strategic customer plan in Miami this April.
Cheers,
The TCEL Team
@TotalCustomer

Mastering the Digital & Social Marketplace

To call this an event is an understatement. The annual The Total Customer Experience Leaders 2014 is a meeting of the minds for those folks dedicated to advancing business relevancy through customer strategy. This salon style event facilitates the exchange of higher level dialogues and access to the greatest strategists of our time. It’s where provocation is grounded in actionability and presented through articulate facilitation. The 2014 event has a specialized focus on today’s digital & social marketplace. 
April 9-11, 2014
Trump International Beach Resort
Miami, Florida

Our distinguished speakers include:

How Current Trends are Shaping the 10 Growth Areas of Tomorrow
KEYNOTE: Jared Weiner, Futurist and Vice President, Weiner, Edrich, Brown 
Several emerging consumer trends for 2014… and beyond…are revolutionizing the future of customer engagement. This session will focus on how major technological, social and economic trends are shaping the 10 growth areas of the emerging Metaspace Economy. Together, we will take a quick journey into the short – and long-term future to uncover the growth opportunities of tomorrow for businesses. Jared brings his experience as a futurist working with some of the world’s largest companies to the table and observes how the economy is evolving to put more of a premium on customer experience than ever before.

Move Brands Faster and Longer in the Social Media Era
Nestor Portillo, Director, Social Communities and Customer Experience, Microsoft 

With new social media networks/platforms emerging almost every day, how can brands timely and efficiently engage customers while delivering a cohesive experience that drives customer loyalty? This presentation shares Microsoft’s strategy of serving +22 million customers per month through different social platforms (Blog, Forums, Wiki, Social) in 13 languages, and why customer experience is the key to making the content viral and engaging. What’s the trade-off between the social platform used, the level of trust and the cost when delivering a customer experience through your website and social channels? Customer experience involves customer service and support, how both can co-exists in today’s organizational model and how companies need to get prepared for the new wave?

Thriving in a Digital Commerce World

KEYNOTE: Jay Topper, CIO & CTO, VITACOST.COM
To succeed as a dotcom retailer, it isn’t enough to sell cheap and deliver on time. The entire end-to-end digital eco-system must constantly transform: From marketing, through the web experience, into fulfillment and post-sale services-consumer expectations are on the rise-and must be met in order to create the loyalty necessary to thrive.
How does technology both serve and lead transformation within marketing, merchandising and operations?
How have expectations in internet retail increased and what’s around the corner?
How does post-sale innovation contribute to life-time value-cracking the code of loyalty isn’t easy when your competitor is a click away
Mastering the Mindset of the Millennial Candidate
Kassandra Barnes, Research & Content Manager, CareerBuilder 
The millennial generation is the first to grow up in a digital world. That’s why this new generation of candidates, who navigate the increasingly complex and fragmented digital environment with ease, is a challenge for many organizations. We’ll examine insights gleaned from years of studying candidate behavior online and discuss how organizations can use this new media environment to their advantage and personalize their experience with this ever-changing talent pool.

….and, many more industry leaders!

Download the brochure for the full agenda: http://bit.ly/1iPF4El
Mention code TCEL14LI & Save 15% off the standard rate. Register today: http://bit.ly/1iPF4El
The take away? A viable actionable plan to securing your company’s future success. Join other leaders charged with creating a sound strategic customer plan in Miami this April.
Cheers,
The TCEL Team
@TotalCustomer