Tag Archives: media insights

Online Ad Effectiveness Research Grows Up

 This article is
brought to you by Survata.

The days of giving
digital a pass are over. It’s time to grow up.’- Marc
Pritchard, Chief Branding Officer, Procter & Gamble, January 2017
When the CBO of P&G tells us to grow up,
we listen. And after speaking with clients at last month’s Media Insights
Conference, it’s clear that there’s consensus: online advertising research
needs to get more sophisticated.
We’re here to help. IAB breaks research down into phases: design, recruitment & deployment, and
optimization. We’ll walk through each phase and determine what’s most in need
of ‘growing up.’ We’ll also include questions to ask your research partner to
help increase the sophistication of your ad effectiveness research.

Let’s start by acknowledging that
statistically sound online ad effectiveness research has not been easy to
implement at reasonable cost until recently. As IAB notes, ‘Questions around recruitment, sample bias and deployment are
hampering the validity of this research and undermining the industry as a
Just because perfect research design is
challenging to achieve doesn’t mean that advertisers should settle for studies
with debilitating flaws, leading to biased, unreliable results. In addition to
challenges inherent to good research design, most ad effectiveness research
partners have systematic biases due to the way they find respondents, which
must be accounted for in the design phase. There has been innovation in this
space within the past year using technology to reduce or eliminate systematic
bias in respondent recruitment. 
Assuming you’re able to address the systematic
bias of your research partner’s sampling, the major remaining challenge is how
you approach the control group. At Survata, we think about this as a hierarchy: 
Using a holdout group is best practice, but
implementing it requires spending some portion of your ad budget strictly on
the control group. In other words, some of your ad budget will be spent on
intentionally NOT showing people an ad. A small portion of people in the ad buy
will instead be shown public service announcements to establish the control
group. We love the purity of this approach, but we also understand the reality
of advertising budgets. We don’t view holdout as a requirement for sound online
ad effectiveness research. Smart design combined with technology can achieve
methodologically sound control groups without ‘wasting’ ad budget.
Along those lines, the Audience Segment
approach has become de facto best practice for many of our clients. Basically,
you create your control group from the same audience segment that you’re
targeting in the ad buy. This isn’t perfect, as there could be an underlying
reason that some people in the segment saw the ad but others didn’t (e.g., some
people very rarely go online, or to very few websites), but it’s still an excellent
approach. It’s the grown-up version of Demographic Matching.
Demographic Matching, in which the control
group is created by matching as many demographic variables as possible with the
exposed group (e.g., gender, age, income), is still a very common strategy.
It’s straightforward to accomplish even using old online research
methodologies. As online data has allowed us to learn far more useful
information about consumers than demographic traits, this approach is dated.
Simply sampling GenPop as a control is
undesirable. The results are much more likely to reveal the differences between
the exposed and control groups than the effectiveness of the advertising.
Questions for your research partner:
  • What are known biases among
    respondents due to recruitment strategy?
  • What is your total reach? What
    percentage of the target group is within your reach? Is it necessary to
    weight low-IR population respondents due to lack of scale?
  • What’s your approach to creating
    control groups for online ad effectiveness research?
  • For Demographic Matching, how do
    you determine which demographic characteristics are most important to
  • How do you accomplish Audience
    Segment matching?
Recruitment/ Deployment

Historically, there were four methods to recruit respondents / deploy the
survey: panels, intercepts, in-banner, or email list. To stomach these
methodologies, researchers had to ignore one of the following flaws:
non-response bias, misrepresentation, interruption of the customer experience
or email list atrophy. In our view, these methodologies are now dated since the
advent of the publisher network methodology.

The publisher network works by offering
consumers content, ad-free browsing, or other benefits (e.g. free Wi-Fi) in
exchange for taking a survey. The survey is completed as an alternative to
paying for the content or service after the consumer organically visits the
publisher. In addition to avoiding the flaws of the old methodologies, the
publisher network model provides dramatically increased accuracy, scale, and speed.
Questions for your research partner:
  • What incentives are offered in
    exchange for respondent participation?
  • What are the attitudinal,
    behavioral, and demographic differences between someone willing to be in a
    panel versus someone not interested in being in a panel?
  • What are the attitudinal,
    behavioral, and demographic differences between someone willing to take a
    site intercept survey versus someone not interested in taking a site
    intercept survey?
  • How much does non-response bias
    affect the data?
  • Are you integrated with the
    client’s DMP?
  • How long to get the survey into
    the field, and how long until completed?
  • How does the vendor ensure that
    exposure bias doesn’t occur?
  • How does the vendor account for
    straight-liners, speeders, and other typical data quality issues?

An optimal ad effectiveness campaign returns results quickly, so that immediate
and continuous adjustments can be made to replace poorly performing creative,
targeting, and placements with higher performing ones. We call this real-time
spend allocation. It’s analogous to real-time click-through rate optimization,
as it relies on solutions to the same math problem (known as the multi-armed bandit).

By integrating with DMPs, ad effectiveness
research can be cross-tabbed against even more datasets. The results will yield
additional insights about a company’s existing customers.
Questions for your research partner:
  • Are results reported real-time?
  • How much advertising budget is
    wasted due to non-optimization?
  • How can DMP data be incorporated
    to improve ad research?

Flawed research methodologies can’t grow up,
they can only continue to lower prices for increasingly suspect data. For
online ad effectiveness research to grow up, new methodologies must be adopted.

To learn more about
conducting your own ad effectiveness study, visit Survata

The Media Research Industry has More Opportunities Than Ever Before

Insights have become a vehicle for influencing marketing and
ultimately, the world. That’s why next in our Insights as a Vehicle for
Influence interview series, we sat down with Sam Ford, a media executive,
consultant, and research affiliate with MIT Comparative Media Studies/Writing. In
our conversation, he shed some light on how the media industry has changed and
how media companies can do a better job at reaching the ‘new age’ consumer.
What is the state of
the media research industry in 2017?
Media research is in an interesting state at the moment. On
the one hand, there’s more to potentially research than ever before. Quantitatively,
there’s more to research than ever before, and organizations are finding new
ways to collect, synthesize, and make sense of all the data they are bringing
However, with that influx of data, there still remains a
certain surety in what it’s saying, without necessarily enough questioning of
whether we’re asking the right questions. I feel like we’ve spent a lot of time
in the media industries gathering the data that is easiest to gather, or that
feels the most similar to what we’ve always gathered, leading organizations to
continue to be driven by impressions-and-reach-based models, when they may
often not be serving the needs of media companies, advertisers, or audiences
all that well.
Meanwhile, there are more opportunities than ever to do
great qualitative research, from audience experience projects to netnography,
but organizations often have not prioritized/invested in these methods. Many
organizations are making deeper investments into digital research, but all too
often the teams aren’t connected in the ways they should be to maximize
effectiveness and minimize redundancy. And, most importantly of all, the sort
of pattern recognition most important for good insights work may not be
positioned in many media companies in a way that allows it to contribute all it
can. After all, gathering data, qualitative insights, benchmarking, and
thoughts about future trends are all only useful if there are ways all of this
is being synthesized, analyzed, and brought to the table for key decisions being
made across the organization.
What have been the
biggest changes in the industry since you started your career?
I’ve spent years on different sides of these questions. I
began my career as a journalist. For the past 12 years, I’ve tackled these
questions most consistently from an academic’s perspective, looking at these
questions from outside the day-to-day needs of a particular media organization.
I have spent many years consulting with big brands from a marketing and PR
standpoint. And I spent much of the past two years working at a media company
operating in the network television, cable television, digital publishing, and
digital video distribution spaces.
Across all those vantage points, I’ve seen an industry
weathering a prolonged period of massive change, largely by finding ways to
hold as closely as it can to an ongoing semblance of normalcy’which is to be
expected in an industry where businesses can never truly close up shop. We’ve
seen an acceptance that you can’t fight change throughout the media industries,
but it has come along with a desire to cling to the broadcast model.

Have the influx of
social media and mobile made your job easier or harder?
Media companies, and advertisers, used to have very few
methods to really understand and listen to their audiences. We have all sorts
of new methods to be able to do that now. So, rather than having to create
aggregate stand-ins like customer segmentation profiles for our audience, we
have more access to those real people than ever before.
However, with that overabundance of information, we’ve
strangely found ourselves in a similar position as when we didn’t have enough
information’relying too often on ways of understanding audiences that may not
be the most insightful. In this case, it’s what’s easiest to collect or feel
concrete about, in a world where the overabundance of potential information
gives us the feeling of chaos.
How has the media
consumer changed in the past few years?
I don’t suppose people have changed all that much, in the
sense that the way audiences are using technology often mirrors things people
have always wanted to do but couldn’t necessarily do so as easily, or’if they
did’happened in ways that media companies or advertisers couldn’t easily
detect. People want to keep media content. People want to share media content.
People want to talk back to media content. People like to have as much control
as they can over their choices. Now that those options are becoming easier,
viewers have to think even more deeply about how they want to engage with
different types of programming.
If I can watch a series at my own pace, what do I want that
pace to be? Do I watch different types of programming at different types of
paces? When do I want to engage more deeply with media content, versus when do
I want to engage more passively? As media organizations put more effort into
engaging active audiences, it leaves those audiences to think about when,
where, and how they want to participate.

How can media companies do a better job
reaching the new age consumer?
I think we are only scratching the surface of what we can do
to really resonate with audiences. Most importantly, I believe, is finding as
many ways as possible to put ourselves in the shoes of the audience members who
are coming to us on purpose. As we get away from reach metrics as the
cornerstone of our business models, it allows us to think about how we as an
industry build around the sort of CRM models that drive subscription-based businesses’that
lead to fostering an active audience base engaging with you on purpose, and
with purpose.
No matter what type of media company you are, it seems that
this is the most important, stable, and lucrative part of the audience, but the
one that business models have all too often driven companies to neglect and
take for granted. When we are imagining each month’s digital traffic goals or
viewership goals as tabula rasa, then everything becomes focused on driving as
much general-audience interest as possible in what we do.
And for those organizations that do, for instance,
serialized programming or subscription models, there’s still a lot of work to
be done to really understand and think about everything the media company does
from the shoes of that active audience. How do they want to engage with the
content? What else do they want from the media brand? Why do they become
proselytizers? How do you identify audiences already engaged in similar content
but who haven’t yet found their way to you? In such a cluttered media landscape
as we have today, we can’t take for granted that people will quickly find us.
What is the biggest
challenge in the media industry today?
We have machines built around pushing what’s on/coming out
now, not for maintaining the longevity of content that has the potential for a
long shelf-life. In an era where a good portion of media content is available
for on-demand engagement later, we have to think about how we support machines
that are much better at monetizing media products over time, thinking about
investments in content for which the ROI may come slowly but which may continue
on for years, if supported in the right way.
We see glimpses of this in how subscription services think
about investment in original content production’and I recommend everyone read
Amanda Lotz’s new treatise Portals as
a way to dig more deeply into these questions. But media businesses, and the
research teams that support them, have to think about how to recalibrate the
machines we’ve built over the last few decades to these new types of questions.
Where do you see
media research moving in 5 years?
I hope to see media researchers continue to make great
strides in helping organizations create meaningful media texts which
demonstrate an understanding of what audiences want and how audiences want to
engage them. I hope to see research and insights work, as a function, taken
increasingly serious by corporate decision-makers who need the expertise that
the best of the research & insights field have to offer.
In an era where so much remains up in the air about the
media industries, and where trust in media companies has been a topic of common
popular discussion, it’s up to media researchers to think about the role they
can play as catalysts for a discussion about how we build models that serve
content producers, media companies, advertisers, and audiences better than what
we have right now. If we don’t take advantage of the current liminal moment for
the television industry (See M.J. Robinson’s work on this in the forthcoming
book, Television
on Demand
), then I don’t know what will make us seriously tackle these
questions until models start falling apart.

Sam Ford is a media
executive, consultant, and research affiliate with MIT Comparative Media
Studies/Writing. He also teaches in the Popular Culture Studies Program at
Western Kentucky University. In 2015-2016, he founded and ran the
Univision/Fusion Media Group Center for Innovation and Engagement, as VP,
Innovation & Engagement, for Fusion. He is also co-author of the 2013 book, Spreadable
Media: Creating Value and Meaning in a Networked Culture. More on his
work here.

See Who You’ll Meet at The Media Insights & Engagement Conference

See Who You’ll Meet at The Media Insights &
Engagement Conference
The Media Insights & Engagement Conference WILL Sell
Don’t worry, there’s no need to panic yet!
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they uncover what’s next for the industry and how to stay ahead.
20th Television
21st Century Narrative
A&E Networks
AMC Networks
Annik Inc
BBC America
BET Networks
Bravo and Oxygen Media
Charter Communications
Cint USA Inc
Clarion Research Inc
Chadwick Martin Bailey
Consensus Point
Cooper Smith Advertising
Council for Research Excellence
Country Music Association
Creative Artists Agency
Discovery Communications
Disney ABC Television Group
Disney Channel Worldwide and Freeform
Disney World
Dreyfus Advisors LLC
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Fusion Media Group
HBO Latin America
Horowitz Research
Hub Entertainment Research
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Lieberman Research Worldwide
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Scripps Network
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Simmons Research
Sony Pictures Television
Spectrum Reach
Starz Entertainment LLC
Trend Hunter
TRP Research
Turner Broadcasting
Universal Music Group
University of Chicago
Vision Critical
Warner Brothers
Join YOUR industry at The Media Insights & Engagement
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We hope to see you in Fort Lauderdale!
The Media Insights & Engagement Conference Team

Selling on Emotion: Why Show Ratings and Demographics No Longer Tell the Whole Story

By Jared Feldman, Founder & CEO of Canvs

An earlier version of this article appeared in AdAge.

With upfront season just around the corner, early signs are that brands, finally, are again buying more of what networks are selling.

That’s great news for the networks, after over three straight years of declines in upfront ad-time purchases (and two years of plateaued spending before that). But as the buying season kicks off, let me suggest that brands should pay attention to some new factors this year as they lock in deals.

In the past, in making decisions about where to spend their ad dollars, buyers had only ratings and some demographic data about existing shows, plus a first peek at new ones coming in the fall. What I’d like to propose is that buyers not use, or just use, those same old methods this time around.

Oh sure, keep the ratings and demos you’re used to working with. Nielsen’s work continues to have value and it’s evolving to embrace the new TV realities.

But show ratings and audience demographics by themselves no longer tell ad buyers everything they need to know in the new universe of “TV” we now live in. The TV audience is shifting, and in lots of directions at once. With it, the business is shifting, too.

Audiences are watching TV in more ways and on more platforms than ever, and at different times and in different settings. Just as importantly, audiences are talking about the shows they’re watching, on more social media and chat and other online platforms than ever.

And when fans are talking about these shows, sharing important moments, creating content about the shows, and reacting to that, they’re also evoking and expressing a whole raft of feelings and attachments about favorite programs.

The savviest programmers realize this. They’re building shows that connect with and captivate dedicated, niche audiences who care deeply about that show. They’re sharing compelling behind-the-scenes content, live tweeting with fans, and creating other experiences that will hook and engage the superfans who care most about a program.

And those shows and networks are exactly where advertisers should be. Those fans will be a show’s best ambassadors. And the research says they’ll also be the best ambassadors for brands advertising around that show.

The shows that stir emotional reactions are the ones that also will stir reactions and buying impulses for the ads of those shows. As they say in the business, that is gold. So it’s important to figure out which companies are doing a good job reaching and holding those audiences your brand cares about most.

For instance, the two networks whose shows most often evoke the emotion “addicting” on Twitter were MTV and Freeform (then known as ABC Family), according to a Canvs analysis of tweets captured by Nielsen.

It shouldn’t be a complete surprise — both networks target millennials, who are tech-savvy and sharing-mad. They share everything they care about, including some of their favorite shows on those two networks.

“Addictive” programming isn’t the only thing buyers should look for. For instance, what networks and shows do fans find consistently “funny?” A laughing fan is one predisposed to like the brands connected to those shows.

And though the industry may not be quite ready for it, let me propose another thing. Networks and show runners will become increasingly skilled at creating compelling niche programming for ardent superfan audiences. They’re also going to get better at using the new measures of success and building to it.

At some point, as creators improve, and as brands integrate what this means for their bottom line, we’ll have new network milestones for ad sales. Expect networks to begin guaranteeing more than just ratings.

Providing a minimum level of emotional reactions that can help drive advertising success will become important. And when a show doesn’t drive that emotional response, a network will have to figure out how to make good on its promise.

By that point, the entire industry will know how much emotion matters in making a show, and its advertising, succeed. And then we’ll really see the full power and value of advertising in the new TV universe.

Related articles

Mondelez International Reveals How to Measure ROI for Social Media Marketing

Twenty years ago, in the early days of cable, brands like the Food Network and the Discovery Channel were built, and they became iconic brands. They became very large businesses with huge consumer followings that have also been attractive to advertisers. What’s different this time around is that by using new digital platforms like YouTube, Facebook, and Apple, you are able to get global distribution and global monetization instantly.”*

The use of digital platforms is no longer the way of the future, or something that’s nice to have – it’s how your consumers are engaging with different media brands. Earlier this year, at The Media Insights & Engagement Conference, we had Twitter’s Global Ad Research Director Jeffrey Graham take the stage to showcase not only how PEOPLE use Twitter, but also how COMPANIES are using the platform to connect with users.

For 2015, we’re taking social one step further with B. Bonin Bough, Vice President of Global Media and Consumer Engagement, Mondelez International. During his keynote, Measure ROI for Social Media Marketing, B. Bonin will help you truly understand the impact of social on your distribution strategies and how you can build even stronger, more meaningful connections with your consumers.
The Media Insights & Engagement Conference 2015
February 3-5, 2015 // The Westin San Diego // San Diego, CA
Plus, you’ll also hear from Hulu, Amazon, Netflix, iHeartRadio Clear Channel, Revolt TV, Discovery Communications, A+E Networks, Viacom, NBCUniversal, ABC TV, Univision, CBS Corporation, Turner & more. Click here for the full speaker list: 
Download the agenda for full session details: http://bit.ly/1A5Eb4s
Introducing the REMI [Research Executive Media Insights] Award for Outstanding Contributions to the Media Industry! The Media Insights & Engagement Conference team would like to acknowledge an individual whose outstanding contributions, innovations, or leadership has impacted the way research has shaped the media industry and entertainment landscape. The REMI Award recipient will be announced during The Media Insights & Engagement Conference on February 3-5, 2015.
Submit your nomination by Friday, January 2nd and save 20% off the standard rates: http://svy.mk/1GkDjc5
Mention code MEDIA15LI and save 15% off the standard rate. Register today: http://bit.ly/1A5Eb4s
We hope to see you in San Diego this February, as we explore the new world of multi-platform, hyper-viewing in the post-disrupted media landscape.
The Media Insights and Engagement Conference Team

* Quote by Steven Kydd, Co-Founder Tastemade from NBCUniversal’s 2014 Curve Report

Adapt & Thrive in the New Age of Media with Insights from CBS, Clear Channel, Viacom, Yahoo! & more

If you really want to know what’s going on in media, without embellishment or hype, David Poltrack is the guy. At The 2014 Media Insights & Engagement Conference CBS’s Chief Research Officer broke down the current state of TV.

Poltrack reminded us that once upon a time TV programming was limited to only about half of the day, during a significant chunk of which a lot of people were at work with no desktop computers or devices. The rest was dead air. Programming is now available 24/7, anywhere. “Ten years ago, it was adapt to survive,” said Poltrack. “Now we’re in adapt-and-thrive mode.” Click here for a summary of David’s presentation.

Join us in February as we further explore the New Tipping Point of Entertainment Media. Jeffrey Cole, Center for the Future & Research Professor, USC Annenberg School for Communication will focus on television’s shift to digital, and how broadcast and cable will change as channels go over the top, content trumps everything and the consumer is in complete control. Download the brochure for details: http://bit.ly/1sKjZAI

The Media Insights & Engagement Conference doesn’t only cover television, we cover all the changes taking place within the industry overall. Featured sessions include: 

  • The New Age in Mobile Music Consumption – Radha Subramanyam, Executive Vice President, Sales and Marketing Research, Clear Channel Media + Entertainment
  • Bruce Friend, President, Global Media & Entertainment, Vision Critical
  • Viral Video Hits: The Why, The How & What Established Networks Can Do About It – Shari Cleary, VP Digital Research, Viacom, Kimberly Maxwell, Senior Director Strategic Insights Research, Viacom
  • Consumer Behavior & Consumption Across Media: The Digital State of Play – Tony Marlow, Head of Category Insights, Yahoo!
  • The New Habit of Always-On Shopping – Christian Kiugel, VP, Consumer Analytics & Research, AOL
  • And much, much more!

Download the conference brochure for the full agenda and session descriptions: http://bit.ly/1sKjZAI
Join us in February as we embrace the new multi-platform media landscape. Register today using code MEDIA14BL for a $100 off discount. http://bit.ly/1sKjZAI


The Media Insights and Engagement Team


Get to Know Your Audience Better with Facebook’s New Insights Tool

Marketers, you’re in luck! Facebook recently launched its Audience Insights tool for advertisers, which was designed to help marketers learn more about their target audiences, according to the social network.  The company stated in a news release, ‘The more customer insights you have, the better you’re equipped to deliver meaningful messages to people.’
Today, social media allows marketers to reach consumers in a unique, untraditional environment where they are deeply engaged and constantly generating meaningful conversations. There is a huge opportunity in making sense of the social data created by the billions of users who broadcast their interests and opinions across social media channels like Facebook.
Not to be confused with Page Insights, Audience Insights is different because it looks at trends about current or potential customers across Facebook, whereas Page Insights looks at the interactions with your Page (likes, comments and shares). Some ways Audience Insights can help marketers learn about their audiences include: understanding what demographic traits index highest for page audience vs. the entire Facebook population;  identifying the pages liked most often by the audience that has liked the page and; viewing the Personicx lifestyle categories that index highest for brand page audience.
According to a recent post on InsideFacebook by Grant Parker, Vice President of Strategic Partnerships at 4C, Facebook Audience Insights has begun rolling out within Ads Manager for all U.S. marketers, with global access coming in a few months.  

About the Author: Amanda Ciccatelli, Social Media Strategist of the Marketing Division at IIR USA, has a background in digital and print journalism, covering a variety of topics in business strategy, marketing, and technology. Amanda is the Editor at Large for several of IIR’s blogs including Next Big DesignCustomers 1stDigital Impact, STEAM Accelerator and ProjectWorld and World Congress for Business Analysts, and a regular contributor to Front End of Innovation and The Market Research Event,. She previously worked at Technology Marketing Corporation as a Web Editor where she covered breaking news and feature stories in the technology industry. She can be reached at aciccatelli@iirusa.com. Follow her at @AmandaCicc.   

Your Exclusive Look at The Media Insights & Engagement Conference Speaker Line Up

Earlier this year, The Media Insights & Engagement Conference broke records with its inaugural event, uniting hundreds of research and insights professionals across the media industry. In 2015, The Media Insights & Engagement Conference will be your industry’s meeting place to explore new opportunities with insights-rich decision making.
Download the 2014 Executive Summary for a look at what you can expect at The Media Insights & Engagement Conference 2015: http://bit.ly/1yrb5Zt
The Media Insights & Engagement Conference 2015
February 3-5, 2015 // The Westin San Diego // San Diego, CA

Introducing The Media Insights & Engagement Conference Keynotes to Date:
ROI for Social Media Marketing
B. Bonin Bough
VP of Global Media &
Consumer Engagement
Mondelez International
Build Habit Forming Products
Nir Eyal
Author, Hooked: How to Build Habit-Forming Products   
Making Data More Meaningful
Charles Kennedy
Former EVP, Research & Insights,
NBCU Cable
Entertainment Group
PLUS groundbreaking thought-leadership covering Cross Platform Measurement, Research & Insights, the Future of Content, the Changing Face of America, New Disruptors, TV Everywhere, Evolving Business Models & Partnerships, Understanding Viewer Behavior and more, from:
  • Bryon Schafer, SVP, Media Research and Insights, Warner Bros. Television Group
  • Dave Kaplan, VP, Bravo Media Research, NBCUniversal
  • Jake Katz, VP, Audience Insights & Strategy, Revolt TV
  • Tony Marlow, Head of Category Insights, Yahoo!
  • Stephanie DiVito, Director, Audience Research, ESPN
  • Christian Kiugel, VP, Consumer Analytics & Research, AOL
  • Graeme Hutton, SVP, Group Partner, Research, Universal McCann
  • Karen Ramspacher, SVP, Research and Insights, Participant Media
  • Ashlee Gouldstone, VP Research, NBCUniversal
  • Justin Fromm, Executive Director, Research, ABC TV

Don’t just take our word for it, see what the industry’s had to say:

“This was indeed the best conference I’ve attended in the past 5 years.” – Daniel Marcu, VP, Research & Insights, IFC
“You know the standard saying about conferences, ‘i.e. “if I take home one or two new ideas, this will be worth it?” Well – I think this sets a new standard. I’ve got three or four new ways of thinking about my work, communications and the world.” – Barry Stoddard, Vice President, Research, Disney ABC Television Group

Mention code MEDIA14BL & Save 15% off the standard rate. Register Today: http://bit.ly/1yrb5Zt

The Media Insights and Engagement Conference Team

Free Webinar: The Consumer Reaction of TV Shows Going Global – Illustrated via Social Analytics

TV shows have always spread internationally – especially between USA and UK, but never has more data been available to help compare how they are received by consumers across different countries.
Today, social data and analytics can help review UK reactions to Walking dead, House of cards and even Netflix entry into the UK vs local player LoveFilm. Are these brands received as enthusiastically in the UK as they were in the US?

Join a complimentary webinar on Wednesday, July 23, 2014 at 1:00 PM EST with presenter Pernille Bruun-Jensen, NetBase CMO, to learn more about how Social analytics can help provide global insights for media and entertainment going forward.

Pernille is a well-rounded international business professional and operator who has lived and worked around the world, and who ‘gets the challenges of brands. She led the dramatic turn-around of Intuit’s UK operation as General Manager and Global CMO, delivering double digit growth on all dimensions, and winning #1 Best Small Workplace. She has extensive CPG experience from J&J and Kraft/General Foods.
Register for the webinar today: http://bit.ly/1sf7yP7
Plus, do you want to hear more on this topic? Attend The Media Insights & Engagement Conference in San Diego, CA February 3-5, 2015. This event explores new opportunities with insights-rich decision making. Register here: http://bit.ly/1qApCPO

HBO Research Director Tackles Cross-Platform Media Consumption

Lack of Single Source Usage Data, Privacy and Device and Platform Proliferation Vex But Don’t Deter

By Marc Dresner, IIR
Jason Platt Zolov’s daily grind as market research director at HBO would probably overwhelm anyone who isn’t comfortable making sense out of uncertainty.
But that’s the nature of media research today: Platt Zolov manages to deliver reliable insights under challenging market conditions using less than perfect source materials.
In a recent interview with the Research Insighter podcast series, Platt Zolov discussed some of the obstacles he faces and how he’s addressing them.
‘Multi-platform usage is really one of our biggest issues,’ Platt Zolov told the Research Insighter.
‘We know individually how many people tuned in on Sunday night and individually how many people may have clicked on HBO GO or HBO on Demand, but to be able to see how they are moving between those different platforms is something that is very difficult to do,’ Platt Zolov said.
‘There is also the added layer of tracking all the different devices that people are watching on’mobile phones, tablets, new connected TV experiences with Apple TV and Roku’,’ he added.

“There are a lot of privacy issues around trying to link multi-platform usage to HBO loyalty’why people continue subscribing and paying that bill every month.”
Without a single source for usage data, Platt Zolov and his colleagues rely on conventional survey instruments and other sources to fill in the gaps, but it isn’t perfect.

And it gets even more complicated when you factor in new, non-traditional competitors like Netflix, Hulu and Amazon, which are developing original programming.

In this episode of The Research Insighter podcast series, Platt Zolov discusses:
‘ Balancing usage with self-reported data
‘ Privacy concerns related to linking multi-platform and loyalty
‘ Providing a 360-degree view of viewership in the modern media landscape and more’
Editor’s note:  Jason Platt Zolov will be speaking at the Media Insights& Engagement Conference 2014 taking place January 29-31 in Miami, Florida.
For more information or to register, please visit http://bitly.com/LHwwDX