Tag Archives: marketing. media insights

The Media Insights & Engagement Conference 2017 Recap

By: Jim Bono, Vice President, Research, Crown Media Family Networks 
Nearly 300
research and insights executives from over 140 different organizations in the
media industry gathered in Fort Lauderdale seeking to overcome measurement
challenges, uncover the next generation of research methodologies, and create
new engagement strategies.
Day 1 recap
MI&E
Conference Coordinator, Rachel McDonald, started off the day welcoming this
year’s attendees and introducing this year’s co-chairs: Janet Gallent
(NBCUniversal), Rob McLoughlin (POPSUGAR) and Bruce Friend
(Maru/Matchbox).
OPENING KEYNOTE
INTERVIEW – RE-IMAGINING THE FUTURE OF TELEVISION
Bruce sat with
Turner’s Howard Shimmel for a one-on-one discussion about the future of the
industry.  Recently, at a Cynopsis
conference, Shimmel said “we’re at a measurement crisis.”  Elaborating on that comment, he explained how
it’s 2017 and we still do not have a robust cross-platform solution for our
industry. Advertisers want an infrastructure that allows more exposure than
just reach and frequency.  With Total
Audience, we still don’t know what to do with it.
They also
discussed the Turner Ad Lab, and how people go to Netflix, Hulu, etc., to watch
content without ads. What can we do to make the advertising experience better
for the consumer?
Howard believes
that the industry should have a published document that mandates what currency
data research vendors should provide for the content providers. As new
platforms are emerging, we need to better understand where those consumers are
going to find content.
Bruce asked
about big data and how it’s all the rage. As an industry where do we go from
here?  Howard explained how there is an
abundance of research tools out there. 
We just haven’t done a good enough job telling our clients that we have
all these tools.  Big data is a component
to an overall data framework. We need to know when to use it and not to use it.
Sometimes Big Data can be wrong data.
Bruce also
questioned how new companies are great with tech but don’t understand the data
they deliver. However, other great long-time research companies are very good
at analyzing data but don’t have the tech. 
Howard feels that there’s nothing wrong with using a combination of data
sets like Nielsen, MRI, and panel data to come up with the best solution.
Unfortunately, there are too many companies that reach out and don’t really
understand our businesses.
He still
believes that survey research is important to our industry as data tells what,
but not why.
KEYNOTE 1 – THE
IMPORTANCE OF RACE AND ETHNICITY IN REACHING MILLENNIALS
Cathy Cohen,
Professor at University of Chicago, gave us a very entertaining look at
millennials and the importance of race and ethnicity among this group,
especially regarding this year’s election. The majority of Millennials in the
US are Hispanic and African-American, and by 2060 White will be a minority.
In this past
year’s election, more African-American and Latino Millennials voted for
Democrats, while there were more white Millennials voting Republican. However,
in the 2016 primary vote the choice among all Millennials (regardless of
ethnicity) was Bernie Sanders.
Cohen’s
presentation covered
??        
The complexity of Millennials through a racial framework
??        
Researching race and Millennials
??        
Rise of Millennials in the workforce
??        
Importance of Millennials in the Political force
Millennials are
becoming an increasingly important electoral demographic.  The share of eligible voters that are
Millennials has grown during last 3 elections:
??        
2008 – 23%
??        
2012 – 29%
??        
2016 – 36%
Cohen also
addressed the six key problems with studying Millennials:
1.      
 Generational frames /
over-representation of white Millennials
2.      
 Under investigation of
white Millennials
3.      
 Homogenous communities of
color missing Millennials
4.      
 Segmentation of Millennials
of color – pick one!
5.      
 Millennials as experts of
Millennials – homophily
6.      
 One-offs or waves – assumes
stability in taste, preferences and decisions
KEYNOTE PANEL -
HOW CONSUMERS ENGAGE WITH PROGRAMMING ACROSS SOCIAL PLATFORMS
‘ moderated by Sean Casey, Nielsen Social Guide
o  
Brian Robinson (Facebook)
o  
Tom Ciszik (Twitter)
o  
Guy Ram (NBC)
o  
Leslie Koch (HBO)
Insights from
this panel discussion focused on the evolution of social media and how quickly
it’s grown.
Consumers spend
5.5 hours per week using Social Media on their smartphone.
64% of
consumers use smartphone while watching TV. 
1.2 billion
interact on Social referring to TV.
After breaking
for lunch hour afternoon consisted of Concurrent
Tracks
.  These case studies were
broken into three groups:
??        
Track 1 -
Targeting Viewers
??        
Track 2 – Audience
Insights
??        
Track 3 – Innovation
in Media
The Audience
Insights
breakouts were:
?? 
REVOLUTIONIZING
HOW THE WORLD SEES MILLENNIALS AND GEN Z
‘ Rich Cornish and Tasja Kirkwood, Viacom
?? 
HOW STARZ
STRECHES RESEARCH FURTHER
‘ Kendra Sindleman, Starz Entertainment
?? 
PUT A SEXY SPIN
ON YOUR SALES STORY
‘ Karen Ramspacher, David Tice and Jola Burnett, GfK MRI
?? 
LEVERAGING FAN
PASSION IN COLLEGE SPORTS
‘ Keith Friedenberg, WME/IMG
?? 
EMOTIONAL
CONNECTION: A MEASURE BEYOND RATINGS FOR TELEVISION
‘ Lauren
Zweifler, NBCU
The Innovations
in Media
breakouts were:
?? 
MAXIMIZING AD
ENGAGEMENT IN TOTDAY’S CROSS-PLATFORM WORLD
‘ Jon
Giegengack and Peter Fondulas, Hub Entertainment Research, and Richard Zackon,
CRE
?? 
EXPLORING THE FUTURES OF STORYTELLING AND ENGAGEMENT THROUGH SLOW
INNOVATION
- Sam Ford, MIT Comparative Media Studies
?? 
VOICES OF MADTECH: HOW MARKETERS & AGENCIES SEE THE MADTECH WORLD ‘ Sherrill Mane, Ipsos
Connect
?? 
LEVERAGING AUDIENCE
VIEWERSHIP & BEAVIORAL INSIGHTS FOR LINEAR MONETIZATION
‘ Shiv Sehgal,
RSG Media
Below are the Track 1 – Targeting Viewers case
studies:
FROM ORDINARY
TARGET TO PERSUADABLE TARGET
David Kaplan
from Bravo, along with Zach Schessel from NBCU and Peter Bouchard from Civis
Analytics, discussing how to hit the right target audience and
“swing” viewers. The presentation also looked at how to attract
casual viewers without alienating the core viewers.
Key takeaways
were:
??        
The different creative approach is often required for on-air vs.
off-channel to drive maximum impact with loyal and casual viewers
??        
Casual Bravo viewers may all have some affinity for the network
but only the “swing viewers” in this group can be readily persuaded
to deepen their commitment and watch more
??        
 An ad’s positive persuadability
should be balanced with any potential backlash effects to ensure a net positive
effect
??        
 Not all swing viewers are
created equal, e.g. consumers in different DMAs can have a varied response to
creative hooks
VIEWING
PREDICTIONS & INVENTORY OPTIMIZATION: THE SECRETS TO SUCCESS IN AUDIENCE
TARGETING
Steve Schmitt
of TiVo showed us how TiVo is helping clients get from traditional linear to
non-linear content, and how they improved campaign performance using optimizers
and brand targeting. His presentation focused on how:
??        
 TV consumption has
undergone profound changes, especially Millennials age 18-34
??        
 Total video consumption
continues to expand with DVR, VOD, SVOD and online/mobile viewing extending the
power of linear TV
??        
 Linear TV has majority share,
but it is declining as on-demand options expand
Concepts on the
rise are binge viewing, on-demand, cord-cutting and cord-shaving, while things
like appointment viewing and one-size-fits-all on decline.
ONLINE VIDEO IN
THE TOOLBOX: A MUST HAVE
Darlene
LaChapelle and Maya Abinakad from AOL talked about the top drivers for video
growth, with “social media video offerings” and “better quality
creative” leading the way, and how online video growth is driven by mobile
devices.
??        
Online video viewing on a smartphone is on par with that of a
computer
??        
 Consumers indicate they
have few technical barriers watching online video on their smartphones, but get
the convenience of watching anywhere, anytime
??        
 62% said I watch more
online video today than one year ago
??        
 62% said in the next 6 months
I expect to watch more online video
Laptop/desktop
(70%) is still the leading device on which online video is watch daily, just
edging smartphone (67%)
HOW TO ENGAGE
MULTICULTURAL MILLENNIAL INFLUENCERS IN 2017 AND BEYOND
Our afternoon
continued with our only Track 1 panel. 
The panel was moderated by Horowitz’s Adriana Waterson, and we heard
from Michele Meyer (Univision), Tom Kralik (Revolt) and Lia Silkworth
(Telemundo) as they discussed their key takeaways about multicultural
millennials and the importance of this audience in our business today, as
leading consumers of cross-platform media.
??        
 Hispanics are leading the
charge in cross-platform media consumption
??        
 Millennial and Gen Z trends
ARE multicultural trends
??        
Gen Z is more diverse and multicultural and are digital natives
??        
 If you join a multicultural
network, your general market skills may not “translate”
THE NEXT
GENERATION OF AD EFFECTIVENESS
Our first day
concluded with this presentation from Chris Kelly at Survata.
Day
2 recap
Co-chair Rob
McLoughlin opened the morning with a recap for Day 1, and a look at what to
expect for Day 2.
KEYNOTE 1: MULTIDIMENSIONAL MEDIA & THE FUTURE OF
ENGAGEMENT
Amber Case,
author of Design for the Next Generation of Devices, gave us a comical look at
connected devices and how the average consumer has become dependent on them.  She showed us products like PetNet, and how
the Web and technology play a major role in self-development.
In this world
of ever changing technology, we need to make sure that ‘machines shouldn’t act
like humans, and humans shouldn’t act like machines.’
KEYNOTE 2 – DIGITAL HUMANISM: THE COMING AGE OF CONTENT
Edwin Wong of
Buzzfeed gave us his insights on Recoding Culture.  We got a look at Millennials and how culture
is being reshaped and where it’s headed.
76% of Gen Y
say “it’s the norm to be radical” (as opposed to 60% of Gen X).
Buzzfeed conducted
a study breaking millennials into 4 groups:
o  
Omegas
o  
Sigma’s
o  
Cult Kids
o  
Nichesters
And we found
that there are strong overlaps between these groups.
Wong stressed
how we’re moving towards the end of demographics, evolution of psychographics
and the rise of the individual.
He ended his
keynote with a very touching video about Asians and their stories about the sacrifices
their parents made for them.
KEYNOTE 3 – BEYOND
THE STORY: WHY YOU NEED A NARRATIVE
Tobin
Trevarthen of 21st Century Narrative and author of Narrative Generation was our
next keynote speaker and covered:
??        
what is a narrative
??        
why you need a narrative
??        
story vs. Narrative
??        
building a narrative
A narrative
differs from a story.  More directly, a
narrative is a mosaic of related, contextual stories that inform and define
one’s perspective.
A story has a
beginning, a middle and an end.  A story
has a plot, and acts as a one-way monologue.
A narrative is
endless, and has a more interactive dialogue.
Tobin showed
how Tesla automotive expanded the brand narrative to reach consumers.
KEYNOTE 4 – ADDRESSING
TRUST AND TRANSPARENCY WITH BIG DATA IN TV MEASUREMENT
Mainak
Mazumdar, CRO of Nielsen, was our last keynote speaker of the morning.  Mazumdar explained how recently data sets had
errors and inaccuracies in station crediting, time shifted content and missing
live viewing.  He addressed 2 key
questions:
??        
what is our “ground truth?
??        
how do we understand and correct for biases?
Nielsen used
RPD data along with 200,000+ high quality person’s panel to address methodology
challenges.
His RPD data
and panel findings showed that:
??        
20% of live RPD minutes were credited to the wrong station
??        
25% of live viewing in the RPD was missing
??        
40% of time shifted viewing was credited to the wrong content
Nielsen is
working hard to understand and correct these inaccuracies.
The Day 2
afternoon Audience Insights breakouts were:
?? 
comScore SHARES
THE KEY TO UNLOCKING AUDIENCE INSIGHTS
‘ Carol Hinnant, comScore
?? 
WHY CO-VIEWING
MATTERS

Marc Normand, Disney-Freeform and Brian West, Disney ABC
?? 
AUDIENCE
INSIGHTS FOR 2017 AND BEYOND
‘ Rick Kelly, FUEL CYCLE
?? 
ADVANCE YOUR
INSIGHTS BY REBUILDING YOUR COMSUMER COMMUNITY
‘ Jim Powel,
Comcast
The Innovations
in Media
breakouts were:
?? 
INSIGHTS OR
INSANITY IN THE AGE OF COMPLEXITY
‘ James Petretti, Sony Pictures Television
?? 
HOW BBC AMERICA BROUGHT THEIR AUDIENCE TO LIFE THROUGH ETHNO-SEGMENTATION ‘ Courtney
Thomasma, BBC America and Robert Miner, Miner & Co.
?? 
MARKETING TV NEWS RELEVANT TO NEW GENERATIONS ‘ Kimberly
Maxwell, NBC News, Sam Ford, MIT Comparative and Peggy Einnehmer, LRW
?? 
FUTURE OF
ONLINE VIDEO
‘ David Dowd, Tubular Labs
Below are the Track 1 – Targeting Viewers case
studies:
CHANNEL ME
Jason
Shalaveyus from Starcom and Nicole Tramontano from Turner showed us how agencies
and media companies need to understand how consumer video ad experiences keep
pace with content experiences. 
Despite the
industry pendulum swing away from engaged reach towards efficiency and
programmatic buying in recent years, Starcom and Turner set out to determine:
??        
Relative importance of contextual factors that influence ad
receptivity
??        
Range of impact for individual factors
??        
Net effect of multiple factors
??        
Prevalence of optimal contexts among segments
??        
Whether contextual relevance can improve upon category relevance
??        
If ceding even more control to the viewer improved the overall
viewing experience
Top findings:
??        
Easy wins where you have high control over highly influential
factors are hard to come by
??        
Life environments affect receptivity more than ad environments
??        
Content has a stable shelf life, but ads spoil quickly
??        
Relevance is important both in the market and in the moment
??        
The cat is out of the bag as far as control, but leashes can work
In summary:
A rising tide
lifts all boats.
Don’t neglect
the impact of context.
Be selective.
Be Flexible.
GEN Z: DIVING
INTO THE YOUTH GENERATION
Armida Ascano
and Gil Haddi from Trend Hunter are helping clients find the stories that
connect them to Gen Z (infants to 17) – what defines them and what they mean to
Media.  They are not as big as
Millennials, but they are just as important. 
By 2020, Gen Z will be 40% of the consumer base.
They explained
the overall differences between to two age group.
Online
Presence:
??        
Gen Y ‘ Facebook (overshare)
??        
Gen Z ‘ Snapchat (private)
Media
Consumption:
??        
Gen Y ‘ Love content
??        
Gen Z ‘ Really, really love content
Outlook on
Life:
??        
Gen Y ‘ Laissez faire
??        
Gen Z ‘ Cautiously planning
Gen Z is the
most diverse generation, and they are underrepresented in the mainstream media.
As a result, they turn to influencers who look and speak like them.
They already
have the tools, creativity and desire to create, but do not enjoy passive media
consumption.
This generation
is swapping in aspiration for realism.  As
content providers, we need to choose influencers and messaging with this in
mind.
VIEWER CHOICE: PRIMETIME
ALL OF THE TIME
A nearly packed
room showed up to see Melanie Schneider (AMC) and Stephanie Yates (WE) present
their case study.
‘TV is Dead! Run for the Hills!’ ‘Cord-cutting Means the End of Linear!’
‘Cable TV as We Know it is Dying!’
These are the comments we hear in the press everyday about our
industry.  And it’s true that TV viewership
has shown downward declines over the past 5 years.  However, content is up more than ever.  How are we able to watch all this content?  Technology has propelled viewer choice.
AMC Networks
did a study focusing on content, taking a deeper dive into Nielsen respondent
level data exploring viewers, their habits, and how they watch content.
THE OTT
CONUNDRUM: USING PSYCHOGRAPHICS TO UNDERSTAND CROSS-PLATFORM VIDEO CONSUMPTION
Tamara Barber
from Simmons Research gave us a presentation explaining that video consumption
is not just linear and live anymore. 
The majority of
the share of Broadcast viewing still comes from Live (35%) and DVR playback up
to 7 days (34%).  The same holds true for
Cable, with 43% viewing done Live and 26% coming from DVR playback in the first
7 days.  However, there is still a large
market opportunity for DVR after 7 days, VOD after 3 days, and OTT.
Simmons looked
at comprehensive video measurement across linear, SVOD, OTT and other connected
devices.
OTT users are
psychographically different. The Top 10 OTT user attributes included:
??        
more digital
??        
more social media
While the Top
10 attributes for non-OTT users included:
??        
use cell phone for calling only
??        
read newspaper daily 
Simmons is
hoping to use psychographics to optimize Media planning and buying.
Day
3 recap
Day 3 started with co-chair Bruce Friend recapping Day 2,
then introducing today’s first keynote speaker.
KEYNOTE 1 – MONEYBALL:
THE ART OF WINNING AN UNFAIR GAME

Paul Depodesta, CSO of Cleveland Browns,
engaged the audience with an overview that there’s a certain way that things
work.  Whether baseball, black jack, or
other situations in life, there’s always that ‘rule of thumb’ that we are
taught to follow.  However, sometimes the
‘rule’ doesn’t always work.  It’s all
about the process. Paul described a process/outcome quad:
??        
Good process/ Good outcome =
success
??        
Good process/ Bad outcome
= just unlucky
??        
Bad process/
Good outcome = get lucky once, but then rely on that luck to be successful
again
??        
Bad process/
Bad outcome = recipe for failure 

So, how do you
win with a lack of resources? 
Putting together a championship team is like cooking a
gourmet meal – you need the right ingredients. 
We’re always asking the naive questions- why is the market
down, why is this player struggling? We need a reason, but there not always is
a reason, so we try to explain by creating our own cause and relationships.
As with The
Oakland A’s in Moneyball, sometimes we need to throw out the old metrics, that
‘rule of thumb’ and start new.  Key
takeaways he learned from testing these new metrics were:         
??        
Find skillful
affordable talent to replace high priced starts
??        
Statistics can
be misleading
He drew
comparisons of scouting baseball players to testing programs.  Emotions drive our decisions, and we tend to
look for data to support and confirm these decisions, while dismissing any data
that contradicts what we believe.

Paul left us
with these 3 points: 
??        
become aware
of biases
??        
become
relentless in asking the naive question
??        
in the game of
uncertainty, how can we beat the house? Learn by previous failures to better
hit success.
KEYNOTE 2 – INSIGHTS
FROM THE 2016 ELECTION

The late morning keynote was actually broken
into 3 parts.  Robin Garfield of CNN
spoke first, and then we heard Dr. John Lapinski from NBC News, followed by a
Q&A with our 2 speakers.

Millennials told us they wanted a candidate who has a plan
to:
?? 
Create good paying jobs
?? 
Make healthcare more affordable
?? 
Do something about the soaring
costs of higher education and student debt
Millennials also told us they didn’t want a candidate who:
?? 
Represents ‘more of the same’
They were looking for a transformational candidate – someone
who will ‘change the government’, and that they were ‘done with the Clintons
and Bushes.’
Most Millennials liked Bernie Sanders, and both
Trump and Clinton were viewed negatively.

Not only was 2016 the most watched year on record in cable
news (with over 3 million total P2+ aggregate audience), but more people came
out to vote in 2016 than ever before.
??        
2000 ‘ 105.4
million total turnout (54.2% of eligible population that voted)
??        
2004 ‘ 122.3
million (60.1%)
??        
2008 ‘ 131.3
million (61.6%)
??        
2012 ‘ 129,1
million (58.6%)
??        
2016 ‘ 136.6
million (59.0%)
We were show examples of ‘what-if’ scenarios, that
demonstrated how close the election really was.
While Clinton’s popular vote lead was just shy of 3 million
(65.8 million for Clinton compared to 63.0 million for Trump), the red/blue map
showed that the majority of Clinton’s popular vote came from New York and
California.  And the 2016 Electoral
College hinged on a handful of states, with Trump taking Florida and the Rust
Belt states (Iowa, Michigan, Ohio, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin).
KEYNOTE PANEL
- CROSS PLATFORM MEASUREMENT AND THE FUTURE OF MEDIA
Jane Clark, from the Coalition for Innovative Media
Measurement, moderated this panel which included:
Jed Meyer (Univision), Jonathan Steuer (Omnicom),
Carol Hinnant (comScore), Steven Schmitt
(TiVo) and Kelly Abcarian (Nielsen).
The panel gave us a perspective of the industry from the
network, agency, and measurement side.  They
addressed the integrity of data and optimizing tools for better plans.  They talked about how there’s a constant
struggle trying to bring all measurement across all platforms together.
Kelly stressed how measurement needs to be a team sport.  Media companies are more and more starting to
own their own data, and that changes the dynamic of the industry.
There is a call from the network and agency side for duration
weighted viewable impressions across all platforms, and the measurement
companies just aren’t there yet.  The
question remains ‘ how do we get there?
The Day 3
afternoon Audience Insights breakouts were:
?? 
MULTICULTURAL
TV AUDIENCES ON TWITTER
‘ Meghann Elrhoul, Twitter
?? 
FULL SPECTRUM:
ILLUMINATING THE CONTENT PREFERENCES OF MULTICULTURAL AUDIENCE
‘ Thomas
Grayman, SpikeTV
The Innovations
in Media
breakouts were:
?? 
USING TRENDING
DATA TO UNCOVER THE WHITE SPACE
‘ Rob McLoughlin, POPSUGAR
Below are the Track 1 – Targeting Viewers case
studies:
QUANTIFYING
CROSS-PLATFORM ADVERTISING IMPACT IN LATIN AMERICA

ESPN’s David Hobbie gave us insight to David’s study focused on an advertising
campaign during this past year’s Olympics in Rio, and the impact and brand lift
experienced on ESPN Latin America.
THE STORY OF
KIDS MEDIA
The last case study track of the conference had Theresa
Pepe of Viacom give us an in depth look at kids’ data and… The
Story of Me.
We learned about kids under 11 and how they are the most
diverse kids ever. They make up 15.4% of the US population, and are extremely
persuasive. 
Theresa showed us a breakdown of these kids
focusing on:
??        
My beginning
??        
My world
??        
My family
??        
Myself
??        
My friends
??        
My tech
??        
My dreams
??        
Me in a nutshell. 

Since they were born these kids experienced: 
- The
first Black president 
- Terrorism
- Marriage equality 
- Great recession 
- YouTubers 
- On demand 
- Social Media 
- Device overload 
- Gender neutrality 

Their role models are their families’ and some
celebrities.  While 78% of girls look up
to mom, on 58% of boys look up to dad. 
26% said the look up to a grandparent, while the rest of their role
models included YouTube/Vine stars (19%), teacher (18%), brother (17%), sister
(15%), aunt/uncle/cousin (13%), actor/actress (10%), athlete (10%).
And they are busy!  6.2
hours of the day they are in school, while the rest of their day entails
sleeping (8.7 hours), eating/traveling (1.7 hours), organized sports/activities
(.9 hours), doing homework (.8 hours), and 6.4 hours going towards leisure (26%
of their day.)
In their free time, they watch TV (48%), play with toys
(43%), play video games (33%), and play outside (18%).
CONFERENCE
WRAP-UP

The Conference concluded with a wrap-up with the year’s
co-chairs and the advisory panel giving their feedback of the sessions,
discussing plans for next year’s conference, and taking questions from the
audience.