Tag Archives: Maritz Research

Maritz Research Helps American Family Insurance Create a Customer Experience Action Plan

It’s a question that so many people in the customer experience measurement business are asking:  They are collecting feedback from their customers, but what’s next?
Action planning is part of the evolution of how American Family Insurance does business when it comes to customer experience. The insurer isn’t just there for their customers during accidents and catastrophes, they’re listening to the voice of their customer every day.
Maritz Research recently partnered with American Family to help them take their customer satisfaction data to the next level. Brian O’Connor of Maritz Research and Katie Churches of American Family Insurance shared their success story at the Total Customer Experience Leader’s (TCEL) Summit. The goal was to provide agents and other employees at American Family Insurance with information to help them proactively notify customers about rate changes to their premiums.

Check out the full videobelow to see highlights from the TCEL presentation and hear more about how action planning is making a difference.

Survey vs. Social: How Does it Stack Up?

This post comes from TMRE Platinum Sponsor Maritz and is cross-posted from the Maritz Sound Check blog.



Last week, 16 people from Maritz Research attended The Market Research Event
in Boca Raton, Florida. There were great networking opportunities among
colleagues, vendors, clients and even competitors and also
opportunities to share ideas. Maritz Research was the platinum sponsor
for the conference and also gave three presentations. As always, Randy
Brandt’s presentation (he blogged to preview it before the conference)
was well received and provided hard evidence of something most already
suspected. How does traditional survey research stack up to social
media? You can see more details of the study in his deck, but here’s a video sharing the highlights.

Visit
 

Visit the Maritz Sound Check blog for more insights.

The 2012 Market Research Event Will Focus on Social Media

This post comes from TMRE Platinum Sponsor Maritz.  Author Randy Brandt will be presenting  A Comparison of Website and Survey-Based Customer Comments: Do They Tell the Same Story? along with David Ensing, PhD, Vice President, VoC Integration on Tuesday, November 13.   

The 2012 Market Research Event Will Focus on Social Media

By: Randy Brandt

I have been attending The Market Research Event for at least 10 years, and have had the privilege of presenting research findings and points-of-view during most of those years. The Market Research Event has always been one of the best conferences of its type, but this year promises to be the most exciting yet.

Ever since Proctor and Gamble’s Joan Lewis asserted that social media may replace surveys as a primary source of market research data (which she did at a 2011 Advertising Research Foundation event), there has been a growing debate about the relative merits of social media and more traditional market research.

At this year’s event, there will be nearly a dozen presentations that address the issue of how social media can be used as a key source of market and consumer insights. I aim to attend as many of these as possible.

My colleague Dave Ensing and I will be presenting results of research Maritz has been conducting to explore how social media and more traditional survey data compare. Do ratings from websites like TripAdvisor?? tell the same story as those captured via traditional surveys? What about text data? We will be sharing results that address both of the preceding questions and more.

Hope to see you at our session on Tuesday, November 13 at 2:45!

This post is co-posted with the SoundCheck Blog.

The Time Isn’t Now: Could Online Reviews Replace Customer Experience Surveys?

Today’s second post comes from TMRE Platinum Sponsor Maritz.  Author David Ensing, PhD, Vice President, VoC Integration will be presenting  A Comparison of Website and Survey-Based Customer Comments: Do They Tell the Same Story? on Tuesday, November 13.   Join David Ensing next week in Boca Raton and as a reader of this blog when you register with code TMRE12BLOG, you’ll save 15% off the standard rate!

The Time Isn’t Now: Could Online Reviews Replace Customer Experience Surveys?

By: David Ensing

I saw an interesting commentary in Automotive News (an automotive trade publication geared mostly for dealers) titled, ‘Do Online Reviews Trump CSI Surveys?‘ The basic gist of the article is that dealers are relying more and more on online consumer feedback to run their businesses, so shouldn’t the auto manufacturers use this information as a replacement for their customer experience surveys? While I think that is an interesting idea, our research indicates it is an idea whose time has not yet come.

We’ve done studies in both the hotel and the automotive industries comparing online reviews to traditional customer experience surveys. As a matter of fact, Randy Brandt and I will be presenting the results of our hotel comparison at The Market Research Event conference in Boca Raton, Florida on Tuesday of next week at 2:45 p.m. If you are there, please stop in.

Not to steal our own thunder (BTW, here is a link to the apparent origin of that phrase) but presently we see lots of issues with using online reviews as a replacement for customer experience surveys. Some of these issues include:

  • - There are systematic ratings differences between online reviews and traditional survey responses for the same hotels for the same time period. Interestingly, when just analyzing the comments, these differences are less pronounced.
  • - The demographics of people that post online are different from those that respond to customer experience surveys.
  • - Most online review sites do not, and cannot, verify that the person posting the review was actually a customer at the business. Online review sites in many industries are struggling with the issue of false reviews (both positive and negative).
  • - Many online review sites allow businesses to ‘manage’ their reviews. Some allow businesses to intervene with the customer if a poor review is submitted before the review is posted publically.
  • - Sample size is an extremely limiting factor when trying to use online reviews as a replacement for customer experience surveys. Currently, there is not enough information to develop reliable scores at the business-unit level based on review site information.
  • -  Even when there are adequate numbers of reviews for a given period, often those reviews are not representative of how customers are treated at businesses. Businesses with large number of reviews tend to be those that (wisely) pay close attention to how they are represented at review sites and actively manage their reviews. This is often done by steering happy customers to submit reviews but not steering unhappy customers the same way.

Given these and other issues, online reviews probably won’t give companies an accurate view of their business-units’ performance. However, it is probably still a good idea to monitor and understand this information because it is what customers see when making purchase decisions.

OK, I know what you may be thinking. Maybe something like, ‘Well, that position conveniently supports the business he is in, doesn’t it’? I agree, but I also truly believe it. Please post a comment or two and let me (and others) know what you think.

This post is co-posted with the SoundCheck Blog.

Got Happiness? NACCM Provides Solutions!

The North American Conference on Customer Management began with great speakers with informative and entertaining messages about Managing Customer Satisfaction. The attendees shared about their objective to return to their workplace with new ideas, renewed commitment, and inspiration to lead their teams. You could see heads nodding in the room as these managers agreed on principles, challenges, programs, dedication to the customer experience and most importantly a determination for new approaches to continue and improve processes to delight our customers.

We began the day with JoAnna Brandi, Customer Care Coach, that shared the science on how happiness can not only create endorphins and serotonin, along with a long list of other benefits, that improve our problem solving abilities, focus, creativity, and resilience to name a few. The formula for happy customers included the AAA Feedback – Acknowledge & Affirm, Amplify it, and Anchor it. Statistics was also a part of equation in understanding the 60% spread in performance when employees are praised, supported, and show strengths versus emphasizing weakness. An enthusiastic and well-documented presentation on the subject of positivity was enjoyed by all.
Kate Feather, People Metrics, gave a presentation on Brand Ambassadors and improving customer engagement. One of the most powerful measures for investment in customer service programs was that a 5 point increase in customer engagement could improve average stock price by as much as 26% while a 5 point decrease caused stock performance to be below the industry average. Julie Broderick of Signature Flight Support gave a case study of their Voice of the Customer Feedback Program. The program includes action alerts and accountability that maintains momentum.
The final morning speaker was Randall Brandt of Maritz. He shared about setting the bar for customer satisfaction by determining and evaluating the goal whether judgement, benchmarking, or linkage-based targets are used. The objective is to drive continuous improvement to realize desired results.
As a speaker, trainer, and writer, I feel validated, encouraged, and inspired by a room full of advocates that share my passion and unwavering commitment to outstanding customer service. I enjoyed my conversations with other attendees like David Fischer of John Deere, C.J. Muniz of Blue Cross Blue Shield, and Faith Williams, Cancer Treatment Centers of America. Yes, happiness rules here in Orlando and I haven’t even enjoyed a lunch yet.
Connie Brubaker
Integrity Training Solutions
www.ConnieBrubaker.com
512 346 7270

Do You Have Customer Experience Assassins?

On October 12th, Dave Fish of Maritz Research presented our webinar “Do You Have Customer Experience Assassins?

Customer Experience Angels and Assassins. They’re out there …lurking… but who are they and where are they? Organizations measuring customer satisfaction need to know who they are and where they are. Researchers need to understand them. This Web cast explains who they are, where they are and how to manage both when it comes to customer experience measurement.

Hard to please ” Assassins” frequently take aim at your brand with unfavorable shots at your products and services while “Angels” consistently evaluate services across industries positively. This Web cast utilizes Maritz Research’s CEBenchmarks study which helps identify Angels and Assassins and explores who they are, where they live, and how they can be managed.

In this webinar we learned:

  • How Assassins and Angels differ demographically from the population as a whole
  • What industries suffer from a higher and lower proportion of each
  • What areas of the country are associated with higher or lower customer experience
  • What you can do about Assassins and Angels from both a practitioners and metric strategy standpoint

If you missed the webinar, but are interested in learning more on this topic, visit http://maritzresearch.com/iirwebcast where you can download the recording or slide deck.

NACCM 2010: Maritz Research Explores the Next Generation of CEI/I Methods

Presenter: D. Randall Brandt, MARITZ RESEARCH

Maritz found that the voice of the customer is getting lost, because:
-All listen and no action
-Siloed and uninsightful
-Ad-hoc and unresponsive
-Costly and time consuming

Maritz has found:
-Customers want more flexibility, control, simplicity, reciprocity, and transparency
-Martiz customer service survey found that 68% of companies feel that their organizations are not doing very well at integrating customer feedback to how they are treating their customers
-VoC action ‘ many companies feel that it is not a priority
-Front line managers want more information on their location and customers, not just an overall summary of the brand, they would like to be more involved

How can we fix all of these issues going forward?
-Look at report from Bruce Temkin, Voice of the Customer: The Next Generation
-Text and speech data are going to be filling in the blanks to the regular customer experience
-Integration between social media and traditional methods will become key

Changes for Voice of the Customer:
-Make it more friendly for customers to use
-VOC integration
-Connect VOC data to other data ‘ linkage analysis
-Translate VOC into action

What does customer centricity look like?
-They tell their story, less ‘painful’ than they typically have been in the past
-We’re going to have to go to where they provide their feedback freely: The Social Web (Twitter, YouTube, Yelp), as well as frontline employee feedback, inbound customer calls. Then integrate the data into one source and analyze it in one place.

VOC capturing that worked in the past will not work in the future. They need to be more agile, flexible and timely.

Free Webinar – Linking VOC to the Bottom Line: Strategies for Uncovering Researchers’ Holy Grail

Date/Time: Thu, Aug 5, 2010 2:00 PM – 3:00 PM EDT
Register: https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/158148440
Mention priority code MWS0034BLOG

In Maritz Research’s 2010 Voice of the Customer Challenges and Practices Study, client-side researchers indicated their biggest challenges were linking survey measures to financial/business results and linking VOC information to internal business processes and metrics. Our own clients have told us that the ability to link survey research information to other business information is the “Holy Grail” within their companies.

As a leader in Customer Experience Measurement, Maritz Research is proud to present Keith Chrzan, Vice President, Marketing Sciences, who will discuss our unique perspective regarding the formal, statistical process that enables us to connect various types of data sources to others. Keith will discuss the varying levels of linkage sophistication, the obstacles that face marketers wishing to perform linkage, and the experience we’ve gained with a large number of linkage engagements. Researchers, operations leaders and those charged with performance improvement in their company’s channels will find this discussion an essential primer before attempting to connect the Voice of their Customers to other business data.

Keith is the DVP of Marketing Sciences at Maritz Research. He has over twenty-five years of experience on the client and supplier sides of the marketing research industry. His experience includes positions as Director of Marketing Research at Boehringer Mannheim Diagnostics and Managing Director of Marketing Sciences at IntelliQuest, Inc, an Austin, Texas-based marketing research consultancy serving the technology industry. Keith is well – respected in the marketing sciences industry and has the ability to make complex statistics not only understandable but fun.

We look forward to your attendance. Don’t miss it!

Register: https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/158148440

Free Webinar – Linking VOC to the Bottom Line: Strategies for Uncovering Researchers’ Holy Grail

Date/Time: Thu, Aug 5, 2010 2:00 PM – 3:00 PM EDT
Register: https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/158148440
Mention priority code MWS0034BLOG

In Maritz Research’s 2010 Voice of the Customer Challenges and Practices Study, client-side researchers indicated their biggest challenges were linking survey measures to financial/business results and linking VOC information to internal business processes and metrics. Our own clients have told us that the ability to link survey research information to other business information is the “Holy Grail” within their companies.

As a leader in Customer Experience Measurement, Maritz Research is proud to present Keith Chrzan, Vice President, Marketing Sciences, who will discuss our unique perspective regarding the formal, statistical process that enables us to connect various types of data sources to others. Keith will discuss the varying levels of linkage sophistication, the obstacles that face marketers wishing to perform linkage, and the experience we’ve gained with a large number of linkage engagements. Researchers, operations leaders and those charged with performance improvement in their company’s channels will find this discussion an essential primer before attempting to connect the Voice of their Customers to other business data.

Keith is the DVP of Marketing Sciences at Maritz Research. He has over twenty-five years of experience on the client and supplier sides of the marketing research industry. His experience includes positions as Director of Marketing Research at Boehringer Mannheim Diagnostics and Managing Director of Marketing Sciences at IntelliQuest, Inc, an Austin, Texas-based marketing research consultancy serving the technology industry. Keith is well – respected in the marketing sciences industry and has the ability to make complex statistics not only understandable but fun.

We look forward to your attendance. Don’t miss it!

Register: https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/158148440

Final Reminder for Today’s Free Web Seminar: Stated “Versus” Derived Importance: A False Dichotomy

Name: Stated “Versus” Derived Importance: A False Dichotomy

Date/Time: Thu, Jan 14, 2010 2:00 PM – 3:00 PM EST
Register: https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/542471264
Mention priority code MWS0028BLOG

Stated or Derived?

It’s a perennial question among applied marketing researchers who typically consider stated and derived importance methods as alternative ways of measuring the same construct.

But is this a correct assumption?

Find out by joining Keith Chrzan, Vice President, Marketing Sciences, Maritz Research for this informative IIR Webinar. Chrzan — one of the marketing research industry’s leading experts — will explore the two methods in greater detail and reveal how they, in fact, measure different things. Most of the criticisms directed at both methods apply only if they are done poorly, and in this presentation, Chrzan will distinguish better from worse ways of doing both stated and derived importance. He will also provide examples of importance measurement gone wrong and show how such error can cost companies millions. Additionally, the Webinar will reveal that the two methods have about equal validity when done properly.

What you’ll learn:

- Stated and derived importance measure different things
- If one method is better than the other
- As commonly done (90+% of applications) both methods are fraught with problems
- Both methods can be improved substantially using better measures and models
- Both methods have about equivalent validity when done properly