Tag Archives: LinkedIn

Selling on Emotion: Why Show Ratings and Demographics No Longer Tell the Whole Story

By Jared Feldman, Founder & CEO of Canvs



An earlier version of this article appeared in AdAge.



With upfront season just around the corner, early signs are that brands, finally, are again buying more of what networks are selling.

That’s great news for the networks, after over three straight years of declines in upfront ad-time purchases (and two years of plateaued spending before that). But as the buying season kicks off, let me suggest that brands should pay attention to some new factors this year as they lock in deals.

In the past, in making decisions about where to spend their ad dollars, buyers had only ratings and some demographic data about existing shows, plus a first peek at new ones coming in the fall. What I’d like to propose is that buyers not use, or just use, those same old methods this time around.

Oh sure, keep the ratings and demos you’re used to working with. Nielsen’s work continues to have value and it’s evolving to embrace the new TV realities.

But show ratings and audience demographics by themselves no longer tell ad buyers everything they need to know in the new universe of “TV” we now live in. The TV audience is shifting, and in lots of directions at once. With it, the business is shifting, too.

Audiences are watching TV in more ways and on more platforms than ever, and at different times and in different settings. Just as importantly, audiences are talking about the shows they’re watching, on more social media and chat and other online platforms than ever.

And when fans are talking about these shows, sharing important moments, creating content about the shows, and reacting to that, they’re also evoking and expressing a whole raft of feelings and attachments about favorite programs.

The savviest programmers realize this. They’re building shows that connect with and captivate dedicated, niche audiences who care deeply about that show. They’re sharing compelling behind-the-scenes content, live tweeting with fans, and creating other experiences that will hook and engage the superfans who care most about a program.

And those shows and networks are exactly where advertisers should be. Those fans will be a show’s best ambassadors. And the research says they’ll also be the best ambassadors for brands advertising around that show.

The shows that stir emotional reactions are the ones that also will stir reactions and buying impulses for the ads of those shows. As they say in the business, that is gold. So it’s important to figure out which companies are doing a good job reaching and holding those audiences your brand cares about most.

For instance, the two networks whose shows most often evoke the emotion “addicting” on Twitter were MTV and Freeform (then known as ABC Family), according to a Canvs analysis of tweets captured by Nielsen.

It shouldn’t be a complete surprise — both networks target millennials, who are tech-savvy and sharing-mad. They share everything they care about, including some of their favorite shows on those two networks.

“Addictive” programming isn’t the only thing buyers should look for. For instance, what networks and shows do fans find consistently “funny?” A laughing fan is one predisposed to like the brands connected to those shows.

And though the industry may not be quite ready for it, let me propose another thing. Networks and show runners will become increasingly skilled at creating compelling niche programming for ardent superfan audiences. They’re also going to get better at using the new measures of success and building to it.

At some point, as creators improve, and as brands integrate what this means for their bottom line, we’ll have new network milestones for ad sales. Expect networks to begin guaranteeing more than just ratings.

Providing a minimum level of emotional reactions that can help drive advertising success will become important. And when a show doesn’t drive that emotional response, a network will have to figure out how to make good on its promise.

By that point, the entire industry will know how much emotion matters in making a show, and its advertising, succeed. And then we’ll really see the full power and value of advertising in the new TV universe.

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Partnering With Data Scientists: How Market Researchers Make the Most of Big Data At LinkedIn

An interview
with Sally Sadosky, Group Manager in Marketing Research, and Al Nevarez, Senior
Manager in Business Analytics, from LinkedIn

The introduction and evolution of big data
has opened up a whole world of new opportunities for market researchers.
However, it has also brought with it a set of challenges, not least around the
skills gap traditional market research teams are facing.
With 400 million members, maximizing this
wealth of data is more pressing for LinkedIn than most. We
spoke to Sally Sadosky, Group Manager in Marketing Research, and Al Nevarez,
Senior Manager in Business Analytics, from the social media giant about how
internal partnerships between departments has helped them gain invaluable
insights from their data.

How
has market research changed with big data?

SS: ‘There’s been lot of changes and all
for the positive. At LinkedIn because we are able to look at the behavior of
the members, we are able to do a lot more research in advance ‘ looking at
behaviors, looking at trends, testing hypotheses. When we actually talk to
members, either through quantitative surveys or qualitative methods, we can
really focus our questions.
We have already fully analysed what we know
to be facts, so we don’t have to spend time asking them what they do, now we
can spend all our time on the ‘whys’. Our surveys tend to be a lot shorter,
which is great for response rates and completion rates. Our in depth interviews
tend to be a lot more focused as well, as we can say ‘we noticed you do this,
tell us why.’

What
skills does a market research team need to take advantage of the big data
opportunity?

AN: ‘It starts with a healthy, inquisitive,
imaginative mind. We like to look at this Venn diagram of skills that refers to
software skills, maths skills and business skills. We look for folks that have
all three. If you only have two of those it is dangerous; if you’re the hacker
with the business but don’t know the math and statistics, you can come to
erroneous conclusions.
At the end of the day, it’s about being
comfortable with all kinds of data ‘ we have 400 million members on LinkedIn
which is a lot of data. But we don’t collect 400 million survey records ‘ that
data is smaller. It’s about being creative and understanding the technology
well enough that you can bring the little data and the big data together to
help make big decisions.’
What
tips do you have for other market researchers interested in collaborating with the
big data aspects of their organization?

SS: ‘It’s a little bit of a scavenger hunt
in the beginning because the data scientists are scattered throughout the
company and they don’t report in to marketing where I sit. You have to create
those relationships. I focus on small wins. We are jointly storytelling and
that gets people asking for more, so I can go back and ask for dedicated
resource, hire more people or ask for 20 hours rather than 5 hours.
It has to be a very proactive thing as in
many companies they are still considered very separate disciplines with very
separate approaches. We think about the same thing; we think about member
empathy and telling the story of our members, and now we have a lot of facts
and a lot of opinions and we are able to put those together in a seamless way
which tells really good member stories. It’s being proactive and being
persistent in getting those small wins.’
AN: ‘If you’re thinking about a data science
team, think about how that team can really drive the bottom line for the
company and then that will help that team thrive and grow and therefore be able
to support all these other organizations.’
Watch
the full interview below: 


Influencing Influentials: Understanding Today’s Influential Consumers and How to Put Them to Work for You

By: Gina Joseph, Communications
Manager, inContext Solutions
It would be hard to find anyone who hasn’t used, much less
heard of, Groupon. The company has become a household name, and not simply
because of its vast daily deals. As Eric Rasmussen, VP of market research at
Groupon, put it: ‘It’s the first website people go to when they are looking for
an experience.’
That experience factor, paired with its huge fan base of influential,
makes it the perfect case study for the impact of word of mouth and the
marketplace.
In their OmniShopper 2015 Conference track session,
Rasmussen and GfK VP of Consumer Trends Jon Berry, shared their insights into
the role of influence when it comes to purchase decisions. With big data
research from GfK, Groupon started to understand the dynamics of what
influenced these influential advocates.
In the digital age,
influence is more important than ever

We live in a word-of-mouth world. Twenty-six percent of
purchases are induced by social media, and influencers have twice the social
media reach. What’s more, these influential aren’t purchasing and advocating
simply because of the deals they are getting; the deal was simply the motivator.
The experience was what these advocates were seeking out and sharing with their
networks. The key, Rasmussen said, was to make sure your company is offering
the kind of experience that advocates will want to try and share with others.
Influence is
increasingly happening at the point of experience (PoE)

Sharing happens in the moment. And influence is getting even
quicker. In fact, 81 percent of influential are sharing via social media, a much
higher rate than non-influential. What’s more, it’s now mobile, with influential
using smartphones or tablets while shopping and advocating.
What’s your
discoverable moment?
Finally, it’s important for companies and brands to find
their own ‘discoverable moment.’ How can you create an experience that will
make advocates want to share, and then position it in a way that makes it easy
for them to do so? ‘It’s not the technology that makes people influencers,’
Rasmussen said. ‘It’s in their DNA.’ Find those people and give them a reason
to act.  

This Week In Market Research: 6/22/15 – 6/26/15

Social Listening To Connecting With Prospects: 5 Things social listening can do for your firm

The Hat Whisperers: A Boston startup tracks shopper’s habits to help stores make sales

You Need Big Data Now: 5 Professions that can benefit

Facebook Gives 3 Tips For Mobile Marketing: One in three millennials only discover content online

The Future Of Small Business Marketing Will Be Automated: Getting small business out of the stone age

2015 Will Be Transformational Year For Biometrics: Both public and commercial applications

Microsoft Moves Closer to Cross-Platform Domination: Launching office apps for Android phones

Looking Beyond The Known-Knowns: Why only 15% of the Fortune 500 uses big data analytics

Taking Mobile Marketing To The Next Level: From intent to purchase

Analytics App Helps Make Sense Of Marketing Data: Datameer is launching multi-channel analytics app

About the Author:
Ryan Polachi is a contributing
writer concentrating his focus on Marketing, Finance and Innovation. He can be
reached at rpolachi@IIRUSA.com.

This Week In Market Research: 3/23/15 – 3/27/15

8 Ways Social Listening Can Benefit Your Content Marketing

What is The Key to Improving Content Marketing? Social listening and analytics

Human Behavior and Big Data: The amount of data captured every two days is larger than all data before 2003

Half Of Shoppers At Top Retailers Are Mobile: 10% of internet users exclusively use their phone to access the internet

Drowning In Big Data: Finding insight in the digital ocean

5 Consumer Trends That Change Work and Mobile 

Data Driven Marketing Can Increase Your Sales: 9 Ways to give you a boost

Brand Storytelling is About to Get Much More Effective: The rise of programmatic creative

Improving Your UX and Making Websites So Easy a Drunk Person Could Use Them: This Guy will help make that a reality and will test your website for $150

The Smartest Hacker in The Room: Hint (They aren’t humans)

About the Author:
Ryan Polachi is a contributing
writer concentrating his focus on Marketing, Finance and Innovation. He can be
reached at rpolachi@IIRUSA.com.

This Week In Market Research: 2/23/15 – 2/27/14

5 Ways to Maximize Your Mobile Marketing Strategy

Privacy Concerns: 8 Practices in data collection from getting permission from users to being transparent

Brands Must Take Advantage of Twitter’s Personal Touch: Assessing brands response rates

Consumer Trend: What Are We Eating?… We cant even remember

How MasterCard Is Taking Biometrics to The Masses: Making biometrics mainstream and increasing investment in cybersecurity

4 Ways Data Visualization Makes Big Data Easier

Talking to the “Post” Generation: 6 Tips to reaching the under 14 crowd and how they view social media

Defining Success in Native: How to measure success via analytics

Can Big Data Save The World? Improving businesses and then in turn the world

It All Starts With Listening: Listen to your customers, prospects, and dissenters

About the Author:
Ryan Polachi is a contributing
writer concentrating his focus on Marketing, Finance and Innovation. He can be
reached at rpolachi@IIRUSA.com.

This Week In Market Research: 2/16/15 – 2/20/15

Factories of The Future: The value of dark data

Seeking Social ROI? You might be missing the point, focusing on enabling your business via social media

Make Innovate Your Default Setting: 3 Tips on nonstop innovation

Banks Are Finally Embracing New Ways To Ward Off Hackers: Employing biometrics and other security

In a World of Constantly Deleted Apps, Using Cash to Keep People Coming Back: 80% of app users deleted them after two uses

Big Data in Retail: Winning with predictive analytics

Twitter Goes Global To Attract Developers: The world tour to woo companies and bloggers to build new products

The CIO Can’t Afford Ignorance of Big Data Tech: The mistake of not knowing big data

Marketing Trends: Storytelling, people are tired of being ‘sold to’

Bridging The Screen Gap: Strategies to help brands reach consumers on multiple screens

About the Author:
Ryan Polachi is a contributing
writer concentrating his focus on Marketing, Finance and Innovation. He can be
reached at rpolachi@IIRUSA.com.

Redefining the Path from Data Collection to Insight Curation at InsighTech

With unprecedented speed, technology is dramatically
disrupting the way we gather data, connect the dots and tell our insights
stories. The producers of The Market Research Event (TMRE) are excited to
invite you to the all-new InsighTech event. Redefining the path from data
collection to insight curation, InsighTech presents groundbreaking innovations
in the deployment of traditional and new research methodologies. Hear best in
class case studies from your peers, participate in experiential field trips AND
discover emerging technology likely to disrupt the industry even further. This
dual approach ensures you will be able to apply what you learn immediately AND
prepare for the future.
Learn more about this exciting event here: http://bit.ly/1GvhBrq
Featured speakers
include:
The Future of Technology & What it Means for Your
Business: Chris Anderson, Former Editor-in-chief, WIRED, Author, The Long Tail
& Co-founder and CEO, 3D Robotics
The Futures of Market Research: Robert Moran, Partner &
Global Head, Brunswick Insight
Scaling Research for Breakthrough Innovation – The Platform
Approach: Daniela Busse, Director, Global Innovation Network, Citi
Ventures
Download the brochure
for a full list of speakers:
http://bit.ly/1GvhBrq
Plus industry experts from Twitter, LinkedIn, Jawbone &
more will discuss how the research process is and will be effected by:
??        
Neuromarketing
??        
3D Printing
??        
Virtual Shopping
??        
Artificial Intelligence
??        
Internet of Things
??        
Social Gaming
??        
Crowdsourcing
??        
Big Data
??        
Wearables
??        
Data Delivery & Visualization
??        
Mobile Research
??        
Text Analytics
??        
Social Analytics
??        
Geo-location
??        
And more!
InsighTech will cover everything from mobile research to
drones. Do not miss out on this unique experience that is focused on innovation
in research methodology & technology!
Mention code TECH15LII & Save $100 off the
standard rate. Register today:
http://bit.ly/1GvhBrq

Cheers,
The InsighTech Team
@TMRE
#InsighTech15

Themarketresearcheventblog.iirusa.com

Social Media Market Research of YOU!

I have a question for you: Have you Googled yourself lately?
Do you know exactly what shows up? Not really?
Well you should, because your prospect clients do.
Before you are hired, your prospect clients or prospect partners,
even prospect guest posters will want to check you out. And they should! It
makes sense they want to know who they will be giving money to, doing business
with, or aligning their name with.
Googling your name is social media market research of another
kind. The kind you need to make sure has been done (keywords, websites linked, profiles consistent), is in place (visibility on multiple platforms), and
practices are set (social media marketing)
to keep you showing up as the expert you are in your niche.
I know what a Google search of my name will show. I know this
because I have carefully crafted my personal brand across my website, my social
media platforms, my posts, and through the events I attend and talk about. I
declare my expert status in my niche and I check to make sure this shows up by
Googling my own name regularly and watching how my brand grows.
What are YOUR goals? They should show up in a Google search loud
and clear.
Do you want to write a book? We should see your blog on page one.
Do you want to be hired? A link to your LinkedIn profile should
stand there on page one polished and professional and ready to shine.
Do you have an event coming up? Promote and share and find out
how much social media oomph your event has by noting where it falls in your
Google search.
Are you growing your email list? Make sure a link to sign up is
in every social media bio section.
Brand yourself an expert and firmly plant yourself in your niche
and you will be well rewarded. Here are a few simple steps to take to place you
on that path to success.
Step One: Make sure
your LinkedIn headline uses strong keywords of your business, a call for
clients and clearly states who you are and why you are here. If I had to guess
your LinkedIn profile shows up as number 2 on page one when you Google your
name.  It’s for this very reason you must
focus energy and attention on this platform, you will get a lot of bang for
your buck.
  

Take a look, here I am on
Google: 

Step Two: Are you on
Twitter, Instagram or Facebook? Make sure all of your profiles on each of these
platforms clearly state who you are and what you do. Be consistent! A quote is
nice, but it sure doesn’t get the point across as you are trying to brand
yourself as the expert you know you are.
My Twitter link/profile
shows up third link down on a Google search:
See how my bio here very
nearly matches my LinkedIn Headline above? Clear, consistent, branded.
Step Three: Add a call
to action in each of your social media profiles. I have a bit.ly link leading
to an opt-in page in every single one of my platform bio’s. Use the space
people look first and use it wisely. Capture their attention – you only have a
few seconds to do so- with a well worded call for them to act and tell them
what they get! Do this and you and your business brand will stick in their head
when it’s decision making time.
Step Four: Link to
your blog posts on Google+. Two of my blog posts that I repurposed and posted
on Google+ show up on page one of my Google search.  This gives prospect clients and partners a
chance to really see exactly what I have to say and how I say it. One stop
shop, click that link and go. Play nice with Google, Google plays nice with
you.
Step Five: Choose
events to attend, blogs to guest post on, and podcasts to be interviewed for.
There is no lack of any of these three things if you take the time to do a bit
of searching. On my Google search my bio for a large event I attended shows up
on page one – branding myself once again by the event itself and what I chose
to say in my bio. A podcast I was interviewed for shows up as well. Choose
these expert ‘partners’ carefully, make sure they have social media ‘pull’ and
watch as your social media market research of YOU starts to look better and
better.
Social media market research works in both directions. You know
what you ‘see’ when you research others, and you darn well better know what
they ‘see’ when they research YOU.
You can do this, with the above steps start building your
personal brand of YOU one step at a time. 
Karen Yankovich is a social media brand strategist, business consultant and speaker, and the CEO of Uplevel Media.  Having ‘been there and done that’ in the arena of losing (and then re-finding) a focused approach to business and life, Yankovich now offers coaching and consulting for entrepreneurs and small businesses. Her unique specialty blends her ‘get it done’ attitude with a passion for authentic connection in her personal services and online workshops. Social media and LinkedIn Evangelist, Yankovich guides entrepreneurs to creating wealth by combining smart business practices with simple proven systems that develop and maintain strong customer relationships. She offers results oriented and expert conversational marketing strategies that position her clients to bring in instant results. Yankovich’s background includes over 30 years in the fields of information technology, marketing and customer relationships, making social media her ideal niche.  www.karenyankovich.com

The Value of Social Media in Market Research

People are sharing a wealth of information online.  You don’t need to be data mining like
Facebook Algorithms. All you need is a little knowledge of platform’s search
functions, a little bit of time, and sense of adventure!
We worry ALL THE TIME about what the government knows about us,
but we don’t often stop to think about the endless social media stream. We dive
into it , we are a part of it, but as a business owner if we really stop to
think about it: it’s a marketing gold mine.
First, find the groups. What groups are you a part of on LinkedIn
and Facebook? Do you follow any of these conversations or do you let the email
alerts build up in your inbox thinking, ‘I’ll get to those someday.’ Well that
someday should be today, or at least set aside time once/ week to cull through
this treasure trove.
Second, follow the hashtags. What tags, words, mentions are you
actively watching? Do you take a moment to see who is talking about subjects
related to your business or just letting the fast moving stream float right by?
Taking you and gems of info with it.
What should you be looking for? 
Be ‘looking’ and ‘listening’ for pain points expressed, frustrations
shared, concerns voiced.  These are your
future clients and those words are a future sales page, email marketing pitch,
or twitter campaign. Or possibly a new service you create just to solve their
particular problem. Listen and be rewarded.
We all know the way of the internet is moving toward amassing
basically everyone’s personal brand. What we say, how we say it, what we
comment on and the visual media we show, all form one big personal brand of
each of us.
How you use this brand information and what you choose to
research is less analytics driven and more big picture. It’s the creation of
your ideal client and finding them over and over again as they brand themselves
online.
You already have this picture in your head (or you should). What
your client is talking about, where they shop, what they look like, what they
say and how they say it. You already know why they need you, and it shows up,
over and over again. But YOU have to connect with THEM.
Are they posting pictures of epic travel on Instagram or
Pinterest or Facebook? Then you might want to be visual too.
Are they continually posting questions about business processes
and systems? Then you might want to have advice ready.
Do they ONLY enjoy no-nonsense news? Then you might avoid the
fluff.
Are they enthusiastic commenter, often connecting with strangers
online? Then you might reach out to them directly in a message.
Try one interpretation then try another. If their message is
unclear, be MORE clear.

Dissect what your prospects say, then sit back and
LISTEN. They really will tell you what you need to know.

Karen Yankovich is a social media brand strategist, business consultant and speaker, and the CEO of Uplevel Media.  Having ‘been there and done that’ in the arena of losing (and then re-finding) a focused approach to business and life, Yankovich now offers coaching and consulting for entrepreneurs and small businesses. Her unique specialty blends her ‘get it done’ attitude with a passion for authentic connection in her personal services and online workshops. Social media and LinkedIn Evangelist, Yankovich guides entrepreneurs to creating wealth by combining smart business practices with simple proven systems that develop and maintain strong customer relationships. She offers results oriented and expert conversational marketing strategies that position her clients to bring in instant results. Yankovich’s background includes over 30 years in the fields of information technology, marketing and customer relationships, making social media her ideal niche.  www.karenyankovich.com