Tag Archives: Lightspeed GMI

4 Tips for Mobile Market Research

By: Sarah Canning,
Product Manager, Global, Lightspeed GMI

Mobile phones provide an ideal method to collect and
understand consumer behavior. Given their ability to capture real time
responses, there are endless opportunities with mobile market research that we
can utilize or further develop. As researchers, to capture authentic and honest
input, we must implement best practices. Marketing researchers need to think
mobile and consumer, first.
From social media apps to text messaging, the average
American spends one hour and 49 minutes in-app on their smartphone daily. What
does this mean for marketing researchers? It means mobile devices play an
increasingly important role in our research. We should consider not only the
frequency consumers are using their mobile device, but who we’re trying to
reach as well. Those difficult 18-24 year-old males you’re looking for to top
off your project? There is a good chance you’ll find them on their phone faster
than on a laptop. Now, put yourself in a respondent’s shoes. If there aren’t
enough surveys for you to take, or the surveys you receive are challenging to
view, will you stay active on the panel? Engaged? If researchers aren’t putting
out enough surveys for the demographics more likely to use a mobile device over
a computer, we could see capacity decrease over time. Because of these points
and many others, we need to put more focus on utilizing mobile devices to reach
our target audiences and create surveys that are enjoyable to take on those
devices.
   
Here are four best
practices to apply:

1.      
Design
for Mobile First:
 While both PC and mobile can produce informative
results, mobile provides real-time, in-the-moment data. Eighty-seven percent of
U.S. smartphone users under 34 are never without their phones. What does this
mean for marketing researchers? Build with the smallest mobile device in mind, then adapt for
desktop.
2.      
Limit
Length of Interview:
 Quality
results are impacted by the length of your survey
. The use of mobile
phones, globally, has expedited everything we do in the 21st century; including
the amount of time to complete a survey on smartphones. While aesthetics are a
huge part of delivery, make your surveys short and to the point. Surveys that
are as short as possible, never exceeding 15 minutes, will yield a more
attentive audience.
3.      
Build a
Trusting Relationship:
Panelists are people and they now understand the
value of their personal data, their opinions, and their time. Assure your
respondents that their personal information will not be shared.Consent is
essential
; however, this is an obstacle for many marketing research
companies. Capture data that is insightful, not invasive.

4.      
Gamify
Your Research:
 Gamifying research can result in dramatically higher
levels of engagement amongst panelists (3x higher) and should be incorporated
more frequently in survey design. Marketing researchers don’t need an overhaul
of their research solutions; they can simply form the questions in a more
engaging way. There are now many avenues to pursue when marketing to the modern
world and many distractions to overcome. Be
the distraction
 by gamifying your research.

What Marketing Researchers Can Learn From Digital Marketing: 5 Common Mistakes

By: Eric Lindner,
Client Operations Team Lead, Americas, Lightspeed GMI

Originally published on
LightSpeed
GMI Blog
I recently attended a webinar where Linda West, Director of
Digital Marketing at Act-On Software, discussed five common digital
marketing mistakes. After hearing what Linda had to say about the five common
mistakes, it got me thinking about what we, as Marketing Researchers, can learn
from digital marketing. While digital marketing strategies are laser focused on
creating value for the consumer, we should have that same focus on our
panelists. Panelists are a core part of what we do in the Marketing Research
industry, and our panelists are people. These people’s voices and opinions
are front and center in how we interact with them.  
So, how are those five common mistakes relevant to Marketing
Research?
1.      
Uncovering
missed opportunities for testing and optimization
. Avoid making
assumptions about how people will respond. Don’t delay, test out your
innovative questionnaire design, gamification, quizzes, etc. at your next
opportunity.
2.      
Curse of
unrealistic expectations in testing and optimization
. Allow time for
your test to mature and be realistic about how soon to expect results. It will
only waste time by ending without conclusive results. See it through to the
end!
3.      
Chasing
shiny objects
focusing on the new
and hot vs. the best for your research
. Doesn’t mean that you should
abandon everything, but may be a good idea to explore. Keep doing what works
for your research, even if it is not what’s trending. A part of your budget
should be reserved for experiments (10%), and accept that a percentage of them
to fail. As with anything, introduce change in small doses. You want to find
the right balance of old standbys and new hot techniques.
4.      
Thinking
mobile is just for B2C.
 It is increasingly important to know your
audience. Every interaction you have with people should be optimized for the
device that they are the most comfortable using. Test, test, test! People
should be able to easily interact with things like surveys from a mobile
device.
5.      
Neglecting
content quality
. By offering something unique, getting personal with
your interactions, and taking a data-driven approach will help you stand out.
Good research begins with a good understanding of the people you’d like to hear
from.

10 Ways to Drive Survey Engagement

By Melissa Moxley,
Lightspeed GMI

According to a spring 2015 study from Microsoft, the average human
attention span has fallen below that of goldfish — and you can blame it on the
gadgets we use to watch YouTube videos and play “Crossy Road.” The researchers clocked the
average human attention span at just 8 seconds in 2013, falling 4 seconds from
the 12-second average in 2000, and putting humans just 1 second below goldfish.
We made the transition from CATI to online, but now we need
to make the transition from online to mobile. But, how do we keep survey
respondents engaged in a way that captures their attention? Can we carry them
past that eight second threshold?
From a questionnaire design perspective, we need to balance the
marketing research hat with the respondent hat. Yes, we need to ensure our
paired comparison questions are all implemented for proper analysis, but let’s
grab the attention of our respondents with some color and images, bringing life
to our questions. Let’s be their distraction.  
Regardless of whether or not respondents are on-the-go or
planted in their office or home, distractions are all around them. Have you
tried to take a survey while emails are accumulating in your inbox? Your
messenger pings are flashing and your boss is seconds away from walking in for
your 2:00p.m. meeting? How about taking a survey while cooking dinner, briefing
your husband on the day and pacifying the toddler pulling at your leg? While
these are exaggerated situations, reality isn’t too far off. Respondents
nowadays are taking surveys from anywhere and at any time. We need to capture
their attention and retain it.
Be the Distraction

So how do we do it? While we can’t sit next to every
respondent as they enter in their answers, we can take measures to prevent them
from closing their browser and moving on. Your survey should serve as the
distraction; your respondent shouldn’t be distraction from your survey.
Below are the 10 ways to design an appealing survey. Remember,
you only have eight seconds to engage.
1.     Scrolling
= Work = Dropouts
??  No one
wants to work to read an attribute list or find the ‘next’ button in order to
progress. The key here is ease, try
to limit your response lists to 15 points and minimize scrolling as best as you
can.
2.     Be
Concise: The Shorter, The Better
??  I like
to promote the Twitter mentality: 140 characters, short and concise and easy to
digest.
3.     Avoid
Repetition: Didn’t I Already Answer That?
??  Nothing
is worse than being mid-survey and thinking just that. Don’t ask respondents to
rank their top three brands and then turn around and rank their top six. 
4.     Spacing:
Feng Shui Your Survey
??  The
spacing between the question text, response lists and images needs to be optimized
and balanced within the screen so that there is balance and symmetry.
5.     Sizing:
Bigger Isn’t Always Better
??  This
applies to font size throughout the survey (consistency is key) as well as
image sizing. There needs to be a middle ground between squinting in order to
read the question and scrolling in order to see the entire ad or concept being
reviewed. 
6.     Consider
Compatibility: Are respondents going to be taking the survey on a PC? Tablet?
Mobile? All of the above?
??  Test
surveys on all potential devices and don’t allow mobile or tablet usage if the
survey isn’t compatible; it’s not worth jeopardizing the data or the
respondents experience
7.     Question
Types: the right question yields the right answers
??  If you
are asking respondents to ‘select all that apply’ ensure they can do so. In
turn, respondents should be able to visually tell which options they’ve
selected, getting rewarded for their answers
8.     Get
Active! Designing ‘active’ questions = engaged respondents
??  It’s
not just for physical health anymore. Mentally, respondents want something to
do when giving their opinion, they like dragging logos in order to rank them or
sliding the scale to the number ’10′ because they really do ‘strongly agree’
with that statement.
9.     Find
your inner artist: Colors, visuals and design elements go a long way.
??  Using
these features effectively in a survey locks the respondents’ attention and
keeps it from click to click.
10.  Survey
Experience: Taking the time to remove your researcher hat and put on your
respondent hat helps ensure the experience is an enjoyable one
??  Once
you’re positive you’ve got the survey of your dreams in place, take a step back
and look at it from a high level. Are the colors consistent from page to page? Was
that Arial font on question 10 when the rest of the survey was in Times Roman?
When the instructions say ‘roll over image to zoom,’ is it really working?
Still with me? If you’re at the end of this list, you’ve
made it past the eight second mark and are clearly engaged!
About the Author:  Melissa Moxley serves as Lightspeed GMI’s
Global Product Marketing Manager. As a key member of the Global Marketing and
Business Strategy Team, Melissa drives the adaption and implementation of
QuestionArts, Lightspeed GMI’s survey programming and design. As an escalation
point for regional teams, Melissa strategizes on commercial and marketing based
engagements and ensures global compliance.