Tag Archives: Leaders

Looking at leaders: Ken Erickson

Our 2013 event is all about the Insights-Rich Customer Stories. With that in mind, in the months leading up to the 2013 Total Customer Experience Leaders Summit we’re going to be featuring some of our amazing customer experience leaders here on the blog.

This week, let’s take a look at:

Ken Erickson, Ph.D., CEO & Cultural Anthropologist, Pacific Ethnography Company

Erickson will be presenting the keynote “Able to Fly: Global Design Ethnography and Airplanes” at the 2013 Total Customer Experience Leaders Summit. In this session, you’ll hear how Boeing wanted to understand the experience of differently-abled passengers around the world to improve the design of its passenger airplanes. Fly-along research in India, Chile, the USA and China, with an anthropological eye on ‘rites of passage’ revealed how existing design’and service’made the experience disabling.

The audience will learn:
‘ How ethnographic methods are applied to design research
‘ How universal design transforms special needs into universal benefits
‘ How aging reshapes consumer needs and widens business impacts.

For more about the Total Customer Experience Leaders Summit and our featured speakers, visit our website and download the brochure. Register as a reader of our blog with code TCEL13BLOG to save 15% off the standard registration rates. Visit the webpage to register today.

Looking at leaders: Anders Nicholls

Our 2013 event is all about the Insights-Rich Customer Stories. With that in mind, in the months leading up to the 2013 Total Customer Experience Leaders Summit we’re going to be featuring some of our amazing customer experience leaders here on the blog.

This week, let’s take a look at:

Andres Nicholls, Partner, Prophet

Presenting one of our “Design” focused sessions, Nicholls will be telling the story of Emart.

Emart is the largest retailer in South Korea, with more than 120 big-box superstores, including some in China. With an eye toward a brand invention and format development, Emart recently created three stand-alone retail brands: Matrix, a specialty consumer electronics store; Molly’s Pet Shop, a high-end pet store/pet hotel; and Emart Traders, a warehouse-style store. Take an inside look at the design and development of these brands and their introduction to the Korean consumer.

In this session, you’ll learn about:
‘ Leveraging segmentation data to focus on your most profitable segments
‘ Engaging customers to create a compelling and differentiating brand experience
‘ Designing your brand positioning and bringing it to life

For a great sneak peek of the session, check out this blog post on the Emart transformation.

For more about the Total Customer Experience Leaders Summit and our featured speakers, visit our website and download the brochure. Register as a reader of our blog with code TCEL13BLOG to save 15% off the standard registration rates. Visit the webpage to register today.

Looking at leaders: Peter Fader

Our 2013 event is all about the Insights-Rich Customer Stories. With that in mind, in the months leading up to the 2013 Total Customer Experience Leaders Summit we’re going to be featuring some of our amazing customer experience leaders here on the blog.


This week, let’s take a look at:

Peter Fader, Professor of Marketing, The Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania

Fader’s keynote will be on the topic of “How Can Customer Centricity be Profitable?

Many experts are touting the virtues of
‘Customer Centricity’ as a valuable emerging
business model, but there is a lot of confusion
about what this concept means ‘ and
uncertainty about whether and how it actually
leads to greater profitability. The purpose of
this session is to bring clarity to both of these issues. We begin with a brief review of Professor Fader’s recent book (‘Customer Centricity: Focus on the Right Customers for Strategic Advantage‘) but then dive deep into the profitability question. We examine the main tactical ‘building blocks’ underlying customer centricity and point out some subtle but important insights to help managers make the most effective and efficient use of each of them.

Check out this video from Wharton Digital Press for a glimpse into the topics Fader will be sharing at the Total Customer Experience Leaders Summit.

For more about the Total Customer Experience Leaders Summit and our featured speakers, visit our website and download the brochure. Register as a reader of our blog with code TCEL13BLOG to save 15% off the standard registration rates. Visit the webpage to register today.

Looking at leaders: Dan Hill

Our 2013 event is all about the Insights-Rich Customer Stories. With that in mind, in the months leading up to the 2013 Total Customer Experience Leaders Summit we’re going to be featuring some of our amazing customer experience leaders here on the blog.

This week, let’s take a look at:

Dan Hill, Ph.D., President, Sensory Logic

In his keynote session, “What’s the Emotional Story?” Hill will discuss the customer experience as a journey. There is a plot with risks, rewards, and the possibility of conflict. The customer will have a reaction to any brand representative with which they interact. Not only are the human representatives important, but the customer will also create a personification for the company as well with archetypes such as the magician or ogre.

Attendees will be exposed to:
 ‘ An introduction to facial coding as a means to quantify feelings
‘ The role of emotions in the consumers preview, story, and aftermath with a brand and/or company
‘ Case studies from 14 years of experience with customer service and customer experience

For more about the Total Customer Experience Leaders Summit and our featured speakers, visit our website and download the brochure. Register as a reader of our blog with code TCEL13BLOG to save 15% off the standard registration rates. Visit the webpage to register today.

Looking at leaders: Jonathan Stephen

Our 2013 event is all about the Insights-Rich Customer Stories. With that in mind, in the months leading up to the 2013 Total Customer Experience Leaders Summit we’re going to be featuring some of our amazing customer experience leaders here on the blog.

This week, let’s take a look at:
Jonathan Stephen, Head of Mobile, JetBlue Airways

In his design-focused session “Lessons from JetBlue: Designing a Mobile App that Motivates,” Stephen will discuss the ways that mobile has impacted all phases of the travel experience. With advanced data networks and increased smartphone adoption, customers now have instant access to information at every touchpoint. In this session, attendees will learn how to really motivate and connect with mobile.

Get a sneak peek of what Stephen has to share in this video from Mobile Mixed, “Get An Inside Look At JetBlue’s Mobile Strategy: A Chat With Jonathan Stephen

For more about the Total Customer Experience Leaders Summit and our featured speakers, visit our website and download the brochure. Register as a reader of our blog with code TCEL13BLOG to save 15% off the standard registration rates. Visit the webpage to register today.

NACCM 2009: Walk the Walk: The Most Important Rule for Real Leaders

Leadership takes guts! Alan Deutschman, author of Walk the Walk, shares how putting customers first sometimes starts with putting something else first. His book delves into the concept of what it takes to put customers first. If you put customers first, then someone else is second, i.e., vendors, executives, employees, Wall Street stock analysts, etc. Leadership means making the tough choices over these competing constituencies.

Deutschman shares the example of Starbucks and its CEO, Howard Schultz. Schultz was responsible for Starbucks incredible growth over the years, building from 400 stores in 1994 to 14,000 stores today, reaching a 75% market share. He came to realize that in their pursuit of market domination and growth, Starbucks had lost their vision. Schultz believe that they had strayed away from what made them popular over the years – caf??-like experience, aroma of fresh ground coffee beans, and personal interaction with the barista, to name a few. Schultz realized that he had to lead his company back to the basics and ‘walk the walk’.

A company that built a truly customer-centric focus is Amazon. CEO Jeff Bezos made leadership decisions that were unheard of in the industry. For example, he allowed customers to post negative reviews about books, allowed third-party merchants to come in and offer lower prices, and gave away free shipping. Wall Street analysts asked Amazon’s board to remove Bezos because of his radical marketing tactics. Bezos understood that these strategies would ultimately create long-term customer loyalty and it did. Amazon succeeded at putting customers first says Deutschman.

Some companies have chosen to put customers first by putting other things first. An example of this is Southwest Airlines which has chosen to put employees first. During bad times, Southwest took a different approach than other airlines. In over 35 years, they have never laid off a single employee during a downturn reports Deutschman. Their high retention allows them to train employees in more creative way. By putting employees first, they have put customers first.

You can also serve customers first by putting a group of employees first. For example, Sony’s mission was to create a company for brilliant engineers. When color televisions came on the market, Sony held back from entering the market because they wanted to create a superior product driven by their engineers. Because of their investment in technology, they came out with the best color television in 1968 that had a superior picture quality called the Sony Triniton. Their CEO ‘walked the walk’ because he chose to put their engineers first.

In another example, Deutschman points out that putting ‘cleanliness’ first allowed McDonalds to grow exponentially. Ray Kroc was a clean freak and made cleanliness their #1 virtue. Fast food restaurants at the time were originally a hangout for teenage boys. Families stayed away. Kroc wanted to create a family restaurant that was clean and could offer value. Cleanliness, transparency, uniformed staffed, etc., helped to create this value. To date, cleanliness continues to be the #1 concern people have in choosing a fast food restaurant.

Charles Schwab wanted to create a stock broker business that put ethics first. They chose not to do investment banking, removed conflicts of interest, worked with individual investors and did not give purchase advice. Brokers were on straight salary so that they could provide service with no hidden agenda. One day, Schwab fired his own son for giving purchase advice to clients. Sometimes ‘walking the walk’ requires us to make difficult choices.

To walk the walk and be a leader, you don’t need a mission statement or post your value proposition for all to see says Deutschman. Your customers should know you by your actions. It is rare in corporate America. In all of his research, he has found few leaders who truly ‘walk the walk’.