Tag Archives: LATimes

Corporate America and its Social Media Embrace

Ran across this interesting article written by David Sarno and Alana Semuels of the LATimes in which they cover corporate America’s surprising and rather clumsy embrace of social media. Using the CNN, Dominos and Amazon case as a studies, the article claims that, when the three major brands engaged with their Web-savvy fans and critics in separate incidents in recent weeks, their responses demonstrated how corporations are still learning how to control their messages — and reputations — in a fast-twitch online world. Take the time and read the article for yourself, do you agree with their assumptions of the relationship between social media and corporate America?

Corporate America’s messy embrace of new media comes with pain

Jack in the Box and Social Media

Jack in the Box, a fast food chain, has recently undergone a change in corporate image. After its mascot/CEO/anti-Ronald McDonald character was hit by a bus during the Super Bowl, the company set up a website: hangintherejack.com, essentially opening the corporate brand up to the social networking sphere. LATimes reporter, Dan Neil discusses the social media efforts in his recent article, Jack in the Box feeds the social media beast. Neil says, the six-week “Hang in There Jack” campaign (Secret Weapon Marketing, Santa Monica) was a remarkable document: a 360-degree social media event that mocked even as it exploited the power of YouTube, Twitter, Facebook and Flickr. Along the way it leveraged irony to the breaking point with “viral” cellphone and faux-paparazzi videos, ring tones and texting. Among the crowd-sourced content were 27 get-well videos from fans, some quite brilliant. Neil also discusses the distasterious efforts fo Skittles when it decided to use Twitter to promote the brand. So is social networking tricky for big corporations or is it a case by case basis? We’d like to hear your thoughts.

Superbowl Battle of Brands Continues

Days after the Steelers took their big win at Super Bowl XLIII, market research experts are now parsing data to determine who won the Super Bowl XLIII battle of the brands. According to LATimes.com, the contest runs the gamut from the 30-second commercials that cost an average of $3 million to stadium signage and product placement during the game broadcast on NBC.
Only time will tell whether commercials — such as Denny’s well-received promise to serve up free Grand Slam breakfasts — spur consumers to spend during what’s shaping up to be a rough recession. (Denny’s said it spent about $5 million on Super Bowl advertising and the cost of 2 million free breakfasts.)

Who do you think won the battle?