Tag Archives: Keith Ferrazzi

Changing Behavior Towards the Customer Experience

“A satisfied customer is the best business strategy of all.” – Michael LeBoeuf, American business author

During “Changing Behavior Towards the Customer Experience,” Total Customer Experience Leaders Summit attendees learned that “checklists and compliance will not change customer behavior.” We learn by doing.

Keith Ferrazzi, CEO, Ferrazzi Greenlight and author of Who’s Got Your Back and Never Eat Alone, delivered a compelling presentation about the critical factors to changing human behavior, which include:

  • Building key relationships: Initiate and strengthen personal relationships with managers and other business partners
  • Leverage the community: Lean on your peers, managers and the broader community for personal success
  • Strengthen customer centricity: Build a customer-centric mindset within retail

A successful behavior change framework is developed by:

  • Knowing that change management is about relationships, emotion and connection
  • Focusing only on the highest return behaviors
  • Having an aligned purpose
  • Using reflective inquiry to gain engagement

A successful change framework is driven by:

  • Providing an empathetic challenge to ignite a movement
  • Helping your employees join a movement
  • Peer-to-peer coaching for support and success
Stay tuned for more customer experience insights shared at this week’s TCEL. Stay connected at:
  • twitter.com/TotalCustomer #TCEL14
  • linkedin.com/Total Customer Experience Leaders
  • facebook.com/TotalCustomer

Peggy L. Bieniek, ABC is an Accredited Business Communicator specializing in corporate communication best practices. Connect with Peggy on LinkedIn, Twitter, Google+, and on her website at www.starrybluebrilliance.com.

Never Eat Alone

Never Eat Alone was advice that I followed a few years ago when I attended the North American Conference on Customer Management.  I had lunch and conversations with like-minded people that wanted to learn more about customer service excellence.   Experts gave presentations of the best practices of building relationships with clients, as I nibbled on my croissant.   At the cocktail reception, I connected with other attendees and presenters as they shared their passion for customer service.   After I returned home, I connected with many of my contacts.  One of the exceptional speakers was Kelly Cook, Senior Vice President of Marketing at DSW.   As a founder and Board Director of Texas Women in Business, I asked Kelly to keynote at the annual anniversary luncheon.  Her presentation on Women in Leadership Roles was well-received and DSW even hosted a reception at one of their Austin locations.
  
Customer Service & Shoe Lovers!

  
At the Total Customer Experience Leader’s Summit coming soon in Miami, Keith Ferrazzi, author of Never Eat Alone, will speak on Changing Behavior Towards the Customer Experience.  His insights on helping others and ourselves break bad habits will be helpful in our personal and business lives.   Ferrazi, son of a steelworker and a cleaning lady, developed the practice of connecting with others that helped him earn a scholarship to Yale, a Harvard MBA and top executive positions.   His principles are based on generosity & genuine relationship-building.  As you attend the Total Conference, a few key principles to follow are:  

  • Don’t keep score:  It is never simply about getting what you want.  It’s about getting what you want and making sure that the people who are important to you get what they want, too.
  •  “Ping” constantly:  The Ins and Outs of reaching out to those in your circle of contacts all the time – not just when you need something.  
  • Never eat alone:  The dynamics of status are the same whether you’re working at a corporation or attending a social event – “invisibility” is a fate worse than failure.   

Each day there are opportunities to follow thought-leaders on the topic of Factoring Empathy into the Stakeholder Equation.  Amazing speakers are on the agenda and you will have the opportunity to not only connect with the experts but determine your own strategy for exceptional customer experience.  Learn from my personal experience and set the intention to never eat alone but to create relationships with attendees and experts.  

Download the brochure for more information: http://bit.ly/1idxeUe 

Your 2014 Customer Experience Strategy Checklist

Customer experience is a huge opportunity for growth today. Organizations who are doing it right are seeing profits soar above those who have not. The key is understanding how to align customer strategy against the other long range goals of driving loyalty alongside new business. 
How you get this done is what your peer groups will be discussing at the upcoming Total Customer Experience Leaders Summit.  This year, TCEL explores the new realities of building brands and relationships in today’s socially driven and data abundant world. Discover the emotional drivers that are critical in creating an effective customer story. TCEL shines an important lens on the power of insights and the critical need for marketers to focus on factoring emotion into the bigger equation to get a return on customer relationships. We cover it all at the Total Customer Experience Leaders Summit.
April 9-11, 2014
Trump International Beach Resort
Miami, Florida
Download the brochure for more information: http://bit.ly/1idxeUe

Here is Your Customer Experience Strategy Checklist: 

  • Build an Experience Management Core Competency, Experience Engineering Inc.
  • Be a Leader that Inspires Creativity and Innovation, Starwood Hotels and Resorts Worldwide
  • Change Behavior Towards the Customer Experience, Ferrazzi Greenlight
  • Use VOC to Take Actionable Insights, Asten Johnson
  • Master the Mindset of the Millennial Candidate, Career Builder
  • Use Emotional Energy To Make Your Customer Experience Programs Easier, Faster and Smarter, Brandtrust
  • Put Big Data to Good Use and Optimize The Customer Experience, TNS
  • Bring Empathy into Your Organization, Tarp Worldwide, Sensory Logic
  • Use Employee Recognition Programs to Energize and Strengthen Customer-Centric Organizations, Janet LeBlanc & Associates Inc.
  • Use Empathetic Marketing for Total Customer Experience, Insights Consulting Group
  • Move Brands Faster and Longer in the Social Media Era, Microsoft
  • Build Brand and Loyalty Through Customer Experience, Forrester
  • Incorporate the Rational and the Emotional into the Customer Experience Journey, Bank of Montreal

Visit our website to download the brochure and view the full program:  http://bit.ly/1idxeUe
As a member of our LinkedIn Group, we’d like to offer you a 15% off the standard registration rates, use code TCEL14LI to save. Register today: http://bit.ly/1f1zpvh
We look forward to seeing you in Miami!
Cheers,
The TCEL Team
#TCEL14

Keith Ferrazzi Talks Customer Experience Leadership in the Digital Age

We recently sat down with Total Customer Experience Leaderships Summit’s keynote
speaker Keith Ferrazzi, who is also CEO of Ferrazzi Greenlight and Author of
Never Eat Alone. Ferrazzi discussed how customer experienced has evolved in the
digital age and the importance of customer experience leadership.
This year, TCEL will explore the new realities of building
brands and relationships in today’s socially driven and data abundant world.
The event will shine an important lens on the power of insights and the
critical need for marketers to focus on factoring emotion into the bigger
equation to get a return on customer relationships. Download the brochure for
the full agenda:  http://bit.ly/1f1N97M
Here is what Ferrazzi had to say:
IIR: Why are
empathy and emotion so important in when it comes
to customer experience?
Ferrazzi: Technology’s
pretty much leveled the field with regard to quality, making customers more
likely to develop relationships with the companies they choose to work with.
That’s put the customer in the position of looking for a more personal
experience. They want to work with people they trust. Empathy, vulnerability,
emotion are ways to develop that trust. 
IIR: What
are the key traits of a great customer experience leader?
Ferrazzi:  Obviously,
accountability is critical. You’re responsible for your customer’s experience,
good or bad. But trust, creativity and adaptability are also pretty high. You
have to trust your team to constantly look for new ways to improve the customer
experience. You need the creativity to see the bigger, longer picture. And you
need to be lean enough to change courses when necessary.
IIR: If your
customers have a bad customer experience, how do you reconnect with
them moving forward?
Ferrazzi: Before
anything else, admit your mistake, if it was your mistake, and apologize
directly. So many difficult situations can be neutralized with two simple, but
sincere, words: “I’m sorry.” Customers are angry after a bad
experience because they feel like they were treated poorly. By apologizing,
you’ve already changed the dynamic and make resolving the situation more
collaborative. From there you can turn a bad customer experience into a loyal
customer just by being open to their feelings.
IIR: How has
the digital revolution changed the overall customer experience?
Ferrazzi: It’s
certainly had an equalizing effect. Neither customer nor company is limited by
the old, pre-digital marketplace. Small start-ups can compete against big
brands by serving a specific niche and can reach customers all over the world,
just by being where their customers are online. And with so much market
segmentation targeting your specific customers is more cost effective. You’ll
reach fewer eyes but the ones you do reach are more likely to be interested in
your product.
IIR: How has
social media affected customer experience?
Ferrazzi: It’s
made feedback instantaneous. You know immediately whether your customer’s had a
good or bad experience. The customer is far more empowered and a dissatisfied
customer is always more likely to voice his or her opinion. One bad meal, one
rude CSR, and Twitter, Facebook, Reddit knows immediately. You can see that as
a problem, or you can use that same medium to show how much you value your
customers.
IIR: How do
you make the connections between experience, brand and loyalty, which
together create customer expectations?
Ferrazzi: Understanding
what your brand brings to your customers, not just in the specific goods or
services, but in the visceral experience, is critical. Even if you are your
brand, is your audience one who is looking for something posh or homey?
Luxurious or utilitarian? Intellectually rigorous or practical? Know what
emotional need your fulfilling in addition the good or service you’re
providing, and you’ll turn a generic transaction into an “experience”
which will trigger loyalty. 
Want to hear more
from Keith on customer experience in person? Join him at Total Customer
Experience Leaders Summit 2014 in Miami in April. Mention code TCEL14LI
& Save 15% off the standard rate. Register today
: http://bit.ly/1f1N97M
Cheers,
The TCEL Team
@TotalCustomer

Customer Experience Conversations: Keith Ferrazzi

In this next post in our Customer Experience Conversations series, we sat down with Total Customer Experience Leaders Summit’s keynote speaker Keith Ferrazzi, who is also CEO of Ferrazzi Greenlight and Author of Never Eat Alone. Ferrazzi discussed how customer experienced has evolved in the digital age and the importance of customer experience leadership.
This year, TCEL will explore the new realities of building brands and relationships in today’s socially driven and data abundant world. The event will shine an important lens on the power of insights and the critical need for marketers to focus on factoring emotion into the bigger equation to get a return on customer relationships.
Here is what Ferrazzi had to say:
IIR: Why are empathy and emotion so important in when it comes to customer experience?
Ferrazzi: Technology’s pretty much leveled the field with regard to quality, making customers more likely to develop relationships with the companies they choose to work with. That’s put the customer in the position of looking for a more personal experience. They want to work with people they trust. Empathy, vulnerability, emotion are ways to develop that trust. 
IIR: What are the key traits of a great customer experience leader?
Ferrazzi:  Obviously, accountability is critical. You’re responsible for your customer’s experience, good or bad. But trust, creativity and adaptability are also pretty high. You have to trust your team to constantly look for new ways to improve the customer experience. You need the creativity to see the bigger, longer picture. And you need to be lean enough to change courses when necessary.
IIR: If your customers have a bad customer experience, how do you reconnect with them moving forward?
Ferrazzi: Before anything else, admit your mistake, if it was your mistake, and apologize directly. So many difficult situations can be neutralized with two simple, but sincere, words: “I’m sorry.” Customers are angry after a bad experience because they feel like they were treated poorly. By apologizing, you’ve already changed the dynamic and make resolving the situation more collaborative. From there you can turn a bad customer experience into a loyal customer just by being open to their feelings.
IIR: How has the digital revolution changed the overall customer experience?
Ferrazzi: It’s certainly had an equalizing effect. Neither customer nor company is limited by the old, pre-digital marketplace. Small start-ups can compete against big brands by serving a specific niche and can reach customers all over the world, just by being where their customers are online. And with so much market segmentation targeting your specific customers is more cost effective. You’ll reach fewer eyes but the ones you do reach are more likely to be interested in your product.
IIR: How has social media affected customer experience?
Ferrazzi: It’s made feedback instantaneous. You know immediately whether your customer’s had a good or bad experience. The customer is far more empowered and a dissatisfied customer is always more likely to voice his or her opinion. One bad meal, one rude CSR, and Twitter, Facebook, Reddit knows immediately. You can see that as a problem, or you can use that same medium to show how much you value your customers.
IIR: How do you make the connections between experience, brand and loyalty, which together create customer expectations?
Ferrazzi: Understanding what your brand brings to your customers, not just in the specific goods or services, but in the visceral experience, is critical. Even if you are your brand, is your audience one who is looking for something posh or homey? Luxurious or utilitarian? Intellectually rigorous or practical? Know what emotional need your fulfilling in addition the good or service you’re providing, and you’ll turn a generic transaction into an “experience” which will trigger loyalty. 
Want to hear more from Keith on customer experience in person? Join him at Total Customer Experience Leaders Summit 2014 in Miami in April. To learn more about the event and register, click here:  http://bit.ly/1ces31p

About the Author: Amanda Ciccatelli, Social Media Strategist of the Marketing Division at IIR USA, has a background in digital and print journalism, covering a variety of topics in business strategy, marketing, and technology. Amanda is the Editor at Large for several of IIR’s blogs including Next Big DesignCustomers 1st, and ProjectWorld and World Congress for Business Analysts, and a regular contributor to Front End of Innovation and The Market Research Event,. She previously worked at Technology Marketing Corporation as a Web Editor where she covered breaking news and feature stories in the technology industry. She can be reached at aciccatelli@iirusa.com. Follow her at @AmandaCicc.

NACCM 2008: We Are All Storytellers

Becky and Greg have been good enough to provide their own perspectives on our keynotes yesterday. I also was on hand for our great presentations. The morning began with an opening address from our chairperson, JoAnna Brandi. I’ve had the chance to work every day during this conference with JoAnna. She has reminded so many here of the importance of looking past customer satisfaction and to remember that even for ourselves, satisfactory marks are not enough. We are all seeking the exemplary. She reinforced what Kevin discussed the night before that we are all seeking the magical, that moment that makes us go WOW!

Keith Ferrazzi, author of “Never Eat Alone,” followed and he focused on the importance of relationships in order to help us achieve our goals in our career. Keith had been good enough to host a web seminar with us over the summer to share some of these ideas. Here is just a small portion of that discussion:

Keith was followed by Joe Torre. I had the chance to meet Joe before his presentation. He is a very warm, welcoming, and friendly individual. During his discussion, he answered many questions from the audience. He was quite frank, not only about the actual details of his remarkable career, but he also reminded everyone that in the end, no matter the figures, or the expectations, it all comes down to people and their own personal responses. Everyone in attendance appreciated not only his insights in baseball but also his management experience, handling difficult bosses, temperamental staff, and the expectations of customers. His ability to manage all of these elements clearly has led to his success on and off the field.

Joe was followed by Peter Guber, Chairman & Founder of Mandalay Entertainment. I’ve had the opportunity to hear Peter speak before. He discusses the importance of storytelling to achieve those goals we have. Great storytellers are able to engage their listeners and create an emotional connection. Storytelling is such a fundamental aspect of our emotional makeup, we all can be storytellers, but its understanding the power of storytelling that will help us to become great storytellers. Here is a small portion of that presentation:

As we come into our final day of the conference, we have several corporate practitioners who will be sharing their own experiences in dealing with the daily challenges so many face in customer-facing organizations. I won ‘t have the opportunity to post immediately after but in the coming days and weeks I will certainly add more material from the event. If you haven’t been by the site, be sure and check all of the great material we have been posting including photos from the conference.

Finally, I want to send a ‘shout-out’ to my colleagues. The team who produces and puts together this great event, works very hard to create an experience attendees will not forget. Even for those of you not here can see how much effort and work goes into creating this remarkable conference. You can be sure they appreciate your feedback in order to ensure you have the best possible time here.

NACCM 2008: Another Day


By Becky Carroll, Customers Rock!

At the NACCM Customers 1st Conference today, we had the opportunity to listen to some fabulous keynotes as well as start to dig-in to the sessions. Along the way, we may have even gotten a little Goofy! Lots of nuggets, video, and photos, including Keith Ferrazzi, Joe Torre, and Peter Guber. Keep reading! Inspiring Employees
The theme across all of the keynotes today was one of community, relationship building, and emotions. (Customers Rock! note – many of these themes work very well with the social media tools that are available to connect with customers, and with each other.) JoAnna Brandi kicked off the day with an energetic discussion of being leaders that inspire customers to be more engaged at work, which, in turn, leads to better customer engagement. As leaders, we need to use more positive emotion; this will affect our employees and our customers. Keep your employees out of the fear we are seeing, and start focusing on the positive. What is right? What is possible? What is the next solution we can find?
She also challenged attendees to stop focusing exclusively on customer satisfaction, as customers don’t want things that are just ‘satisfactory’. They want something better than that! While important, satisfaction is not the end game. The pot of gold at the other side of the rainbow is joy, happiness, Wow, and Magic. We have to start creating emotional relationships with our customers. This is done by showing up at work with emotion, not checking it at the door! It is the leader’s job to make sure everyone around them uses Magic ‘ Make a Great Impression on the Customer. Never Eat Alone The first keynote was Keith Ferrazzi, author of Never Eat Alone.He turned this into a working session to give people a personal relationship action plan for the upcoming year. Who do you need to work with to get you where you want to go? People are critical to your success, and relationships are the core. We discussed which words describe business relationships: Trust, human, feedback, fun, candor, collaborative. Which words add for most personal relationships? Laughter, love, listening, intimacy, reliable, trust, passion. The shift ‘ a business relationship is a personal relationship in a business environment. Make it purposeful; strategically guide your relationships. It is not about waiting for someone else to start the relationship; it is about you being proactive with others. If you have strong personal relationships, you will be more easily forgiven when you mess it up! Video of Keith: you can’t get there alone. Keith had the group go through a series of exercises to help crystallize thinking around this. Our job in this world is to create an environment around ourselves that invites people in to have a better relationship with us. It is all about what we do ‘ it is our responsibility. Lower our guard, invite people in. As we talk to people, we ought to be having the following internal conversation: – Is there something I can care about with this person? A way to connect and remember?
- Is there a way I can help? ‘How can I help you? Who can I introduce you to’? How powerful is that?! Keith also discussed the ‘Fluffy’ factor. This was referring to a phone conversation where the service rep could hear a dog barking in the background ‘ ‘Fluffy’. “What is the name of your dog,” this rep might ask, as a way to connect with the other person and see them as a human being (not just an irritating caller). We need to show up as the human and empathetic individual they want to see. If all call center folks projected a wonderful positive outcome, in their own minds, it would begin to manifest itself. How are your customer service people seeing your customers? As a pain, or as a real person with real issues? Keith also shared about the importance of being real, authentic, and human to others. He stated that others can tell right away if we are not being truthful or transparent with them, even over the phone! We need to have the following mindset, with customers or with those we want to build relationships with: We really care. We want to hear you (people need to be heard). When we have this mindset, we begin to empathize. I will wrap up this section on Keith with a video of him telling the story about someone who cared about another human being and how it changed lives. We then had the pleasure of listening to Joe Torre, manager of the LA Dodgers, share nuggets from his many years in baseball. Here are some highlights:

  • You only get better (at whatever you do) when you have to deal with setbacks. Tough times don’t last; tough people do.
  • It’s the little things in a game that help you win. Concentrate on the little things; big things will happen.
  • Be loyal to each other on the team, and have respect for that other guy who is out there, perhaps where you want to be.
  • You can’t assume your customers are yours forever.
  • What can I help us do to win today?
  • Whatever line of work you are in, it is all about the people.

Making Connections Through Storytelling The morning ended with a fascinating speech by Peter Guber, Chairman and Founder, Mandalay Entertainment. Peter has quite a line of Hollywood successes, including his role as producer for such films as Gorillas in the Mist, The Deep, The Color Purple, and Rain Man, to name a few.
Per Peter: “Coping with failure in uncertain times is a necessity; it has always been a partner in my journey.” He shared three navigational states for these times and how to get through them – fear, uncertainty, and change. Peter also shared that the game changer, the secret sauce, is the story we tell ourselves and the story we tell our customers and clients. Oral storytelling. It is in all of us. We need to connect our story to the emotions of our customers and employees to help them propel themselves through all of this. We are all wired to do oral storytelling. When we do it, it changes the word from “customer/client/patron” to “audience”. One thing to keep in mind about an audience: they expect experiences and to be engaged emotionally. They want to be moved. Here is a video of Peter talking about how human beings are “wired” to tell oral stories. Peter encouraged us to unleash our story for our benefit, and do it by MAGIC. MAGIC ‘ like a hand, each of the following concepts works independently, but they work better together. Motivating your Audience to your Goal Interactively with great Content Are you motivated about your story? Yes ‘ you can craft a powerful story. You can tell, before someone says a word, whether they are authentic. Be calm; be coherent with it. Then tell it. Demonstrate you are authentic with your story. This engages people. Audience ‘ everybody you talk with (not to) is an audience. How do I get their attention? If it’s not a good time to do it, don’t tell your story! Know what is interesting. Try to be interested in them, create an emotional connection. The context makes the story different for everyone. What are they interested in? Find out then connect it to that. Aim for the heart, not the head. Feelings. Often times a story, elegantly presented, can change the results. Here is another video of Peter discussing how he convinced the head of the studio to let him make the film Gorillas in the Mist. In this video, Peter was just talking about how he had come to realize that he was not connecting with his audience (the studio head). So, he became a wounded gorilla in order to help explain why it was important to tell the story of saving gorillas: Goal ‘ specifically direct someone to a call to action. We have to have authentic goals that are generous; then, we both win. Virally-advocated stories are authentic; they have to be real. Interactively ‘ it has to be a conversation. The more senses you engage in your story, the more likely you are to own it. They feel they are participating in the story ‘ let your audience own it so they can tell it for you. It’s the way we are wired. Interactivity ‘ think about it before you start. You have to surrender control. Why do you think you control the customer or your brand? When you relinquish control, it allows them to come forward and own the information in a unique way. Content ‘ The actual story is the Holy Grail. Look to your own experience ‘ true story, inspired by story. Use observation ‘ retell other people’s stories. Use them for emotional transportation. Look at history and use artifacts; make emotional connections today from it. Use metaphor and analogy; he became a gorilla for the studio head to get him to connect with the story and make the movie. Think of your customers as an audience, interact with them with really great content, and enjoy the front row seat to your success. Other Goodies The afternoon consisted of 4 main tracks of sessions. I attended the session on Disney presented by Maritz and The Disney Institute. Bruce Kimbrell was again the presenter, along with Kathy Oughton from Maritz. Bruce told a great story about how serious Disney is about surveying customers in the theme park. He shared that some days, the survey at the entrance gate to the park might only ask for your zip code. On other days, the conversation might go like this: Disney: “Hi, do you have a some time to take our guest survey? We would need about 2 hours of your time.” Guest: “Uh, no, that would take up a big chunk of my time here.” Disney: “Well, how about if we take care of you for tomorrow?” Guest: “No, I would have to change my flights, my hotel…” Disney: “What if we took care of that? Would you be willing to give us your time?” Now that is serious focus on getting the voice of the customer! I also had the opportunity to sit in on JoAnna Brandi‘s session/discussion about what makes people feel good at work. Here were some of the attendee responses – - Liking the people I work with – Harmony – Making a difference – Being recognized by others, especially when you find out about it later JoAnna is trying to understand these motivators so she can help coach others on how to improve employee retention and loyalty. There’s More! Go check out my blog, the flickr group, and my Tweets to see/hear more about the day. Last day – tomorrow!

Day 1 Keynotes – It’s all about people!

Three powerful keynotes on Day 1 – and it was all about people.

Relationships between you and other people as the key to your personal and professional success.

Managing by knowing your people, really knowing them, not just by the numbers.

And telling stories to people as a way to achieve your goals – starting off with your own.

This last point brings me full circle back to last night at Kevin Carroll’s talk. What made that so powerful was the simple truth that his story is his life’s work. Telling it is what he does and in so doing he motivates others to pursue their passions.

There is clearly a theme running here in our keynotes!

Now back to today this morning.

First off was Keith Ferrazi, author of Never Eat Alone (which based on the line after his talk we now all have a copy) who found in a way to get us all talking to total intimately to total strangers. Sure we were only practicing, but he drove home through these exercises how superficial our interactions often are and how we need a different way of being in the world if we are to build mutually beneficial lasting relationships. As you really don’t get anything done in this world alone, everything requires other people to help you do it. Keith smashed our paradigm of the business relationship helping us to see we need personal relationships at work.

Keys to building those relationships?

  1. Don’t wait for relationships to happen – be intentional about building them
  2. Get out of your own way – letting go of behaviors that are barriers to true intimacy
  3. Be authentic – be present for others – not just for the sake of connecting
  4. Be vulnerable – encouraging others to tell it like it us, not just what we want to hear

I was truly moved by his idea that our job is to walk around the world and produce an environment that invites people in…and that to do that we need to find something in everyone we talk to that we can care about and also how we can help them. I sensed a lot of us left his talk wondering if we are up to that challenge.

By the way, I was a circle (other choices were triangle, squares and z’s). Which were you? And was that a bunch of Z’s I saw partying late last night in Downtown Disney?

Next up was Joe Torre, known to anyone who knows anything about baseball as one of its most winning managers and known to Boston Red Sox fans (like me) as one scary dude. What was always so scary about Joe was the calm way he sat in the dugout, nothing ever seeming to phase him, as if he knew his team would find a way to win. And they usually did.

Joe kept his message simple – It’s about people. Managing by the numbers has become all the rage in Baseball, but in the end it comes down to people. A hitter facing a pitcher. An outfielder going for a ball. Baseball is a stange sport that features team play – one player at a time.

Torre emphasized how over the years he worked to make this paradox clear to his players – that if they wanted to to win they need to ignore their individual stats and focus on the only numbers that matter – wins and losses. Each day he urged his players to think of what they needed to do better to help the team. Little things, he noted, like getting high paid stars to run faster to first place – can make the difference in a tight ball game. And that means every player has to come to play every single day – you win or lose as a team.

Then we heard from Peter Guber – one of Holllywood’s most successful producers (my favorite Guber flick was the Tim Burton production of Batman) – telling us the simple truth that people were born to tell stories – that throughout our prehistory that is all we could do – no writing, just orally conveyed information. This ability Guber explained is in us and is ready to be tapped as a tool we can use to accomplish our goals.

Telling great stories – important – got it. But how you do that?

Well, Peter explained, it’s MAGIC:

Motivating your
Audience to achieve your
Goal
Interactively with great
Content

Echoing strains we heard from Carroll and Ferrazzi, Guber suggested we start by connecting better with our own stories, learning to tell them, connecting them to what we passionately want to achieve, using them as a motivating force for others. We also should take care to let negative aspects of our personal story get in the way of us achieving our goals.

He challenged us to think of our customers as an audience. Our job is not just to satisfy them or handle their complaints – it is to provide them with a great experience, to engage them emotionally. This reminded me of Disney’s mantra – “we make magic happen every day.”

Guber urged us to bring the audience into the production, use artificacts passed around the circle to engage them in the telling of the story. What story? Whatever story we need to tell to close the deal, win the case, make change happen in our company, convey to customers what our brand really means. He closed imploring us to think of the story at the heart of what we are trying to achieve. “It’s the holy grail.”

A great morning – many stories to tell – and they’re all about people!!!

Team Bonding: How Building Internal Relationships will Lead to Big Wins with Your Customers

We’d like to remind you about our web seminar: Team Bonding: How Building Internal Relationships will Lead to Big Wins with Your Customers. Keith Ferrazzi, the CEO of Ferrazzi Green Light and keynote speaker at the 2008 NACCM Customers 1st event will be our featured speaker. Register to view the webinar on Wednesday, September 17th from 2:00 to 3:00 pm eastern standard time.

Register for this web seminar here: https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/251030954
Please mention priority code: G1M2100W1Blog

About the presentation:
This presentation will be in a special format: live chat. This web seminar will be shared in a unique ‘interview/live chat’ format. As you register for the seminar, you will be prompted a line where you can pose your question about internal relationships to Keith. Those questions will be address to Keith over the phone live as he shared his views. We will get to as many questions as possible in the allotted time and attendees will be encouraged to ask their own questions during the seminar.

Customer-focused executives are hard at work trying to create new initiatives that deepen their company’s relationships with their customers. In these trying times, customer strategists are in a loyalty budding war in hopes that their customers continue to spend with them. Building an enterprise-wide customer experience that evokes an emotional and consistent message with the customer is more challenging than ever before. Those companies that do have incredible customer experiences, what’s the secret to their success?

In this session, relationship guru and internationally best-selling author, Keith Ferrazzi, will examine where the foundation of building relationships with your customers should start- internally. Ferrazzi will discuss his expertise on how to align internal teams and will share how getting connected with your colleagues will lead to profits and engagement with your external customer relationships.

A group’s success fundamentally depends upon how its individual members work together. Individuals work more effectively and enjoy their work more when they have genuine personal relationships with their colleagues.

The core message with starting relationships both internally and externally are the same. Those core strategies in relationship development will be revealed by Keith during his keynote session at NACCM.

About the speaker:
Keith Ferrazzi
CEO
Ferrazzi Green Light

Keith Ferrazzi is one of the rare individuals who discovered the essential formula for making his way to the top — a powerful and balanced combination of marketing acumen and networking savvy. Both Forbes and Inc. magazines have designated him one of the world’s most “connected” individuals.

As Founder and CEO of Ferrazzi Greenlight, he provides market leaders with advanced strategic consulting and training services to increase company sales and enhance personal careers. Ferrazzi Greenlight strategically leverages the insight of its executives, whose careers span the highest echelons of corporate America, along with principles from Ferrazzi’s best-selling book, Never Eat Alone. Never Eat Alone has been recognized as one of the best business books of 2005, 2006, and 2007 (three year’s in a row since its publication in 2005).

What you will learn:
– Building relationships internally for group success sparks a culture of generosity and accountability that helps participants do the following:
– Help each other succeed in both professional and personal pursuits,
– Have more fun in the workplace
– Facilitate direct, honest communication for resolving conflict, and
contribute to the firm’s success by proactively building relationships with
people inside and outside the organization,
– And more that will lead to increasing employee retention and shareholder
value.

This is a NACCM: Customers 1st sponsored webinar. NACCM: Customers 1st will be November 16th through the 19th in Anaheim, California.

Register for this web seminar here: https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/251030954
Please mention priority code: G1M2100W1Blog