Tag Archives: Instagram

Is Amazon in the Room?

By: Laura Sigman

This post was
originally published on the LightSpeed Research blog.

On a recent
earnings call
, Sir Martin Sorrell, CEO of Lightspeed’s parent company WPP, talked
about what keeps him up at night. And no; it’s not (necessarily) his infant
daughter ‘ it’s Amazon.
‘And I would just mention the rise of Amazon, because in
answer to the question, my favorite question is what worries you when you go to
bed at night and when you wake up in the morning. It’s not a three-month-old
child (laughter), it’s Amazon, which is a child still, but not three months.
And Amazon’s penetration of most areas is frightening, if not terrifying to
some, and I think there is a battle brewing between Google and Amazon.’
The fear mostly seems to be of the unknown, as Amazon is
thought to be quietly
pursuing an advertising strategy
 carefully away from the watchful eyes
of Wall
Street
.
Is Amazon really committed? They are by pure virtue of their
strategically evolving business model. By being among the first big players on
the e-commerce scene, they cemented their early adapter consumers to them.
They’ve grown a multimedia offer around their core competency, and now Amazon
knows not only what we read, but what we search for, what we buy, what we
watch, what we listen to. I’m an Amazon Prime customer, and I take advantage of
all of the bells and whistles that come along with it. So they know what
content I’m engaging with, and whether I’m connecting to the content from my
PC, smartphone, tablet or Alexa. And they can leverage this vast supply of
shopper and behavioral data to sell hyper-targeted advertising to brands who
can then speak directly to me.
When you look at it like that, it’s really not much
different than how we’ve worked in the panel world. Historically, we have facilitated
the conversations brands have with consumers, and have evolved by taking
advantage of emerging technologies to help amplify those conversations. And,
like Amazon, we grew our business by embracing early on that panelists
(consumers) are people, too. 
(Believe it or not, it’s not as obvious to
everyone as that sounds!) Today’s consumers want to have meaningful
interactions, but they also want to have them when and where is convenient to
them. So we meet them on their devices of choice; we always design surveys
mobile-first (in fact, Lightspeed has an
entire team dedicated to this
) and we use
data appends
 to reach the right consumer with the right questions. We
invite survey respondents to answer open-ends with video
responses
 ‘ an engaging experience for them resulting in more
meaningful data for brands to act on. We’re able to blur the line between quant
and qual, intercepting surveys with invites to participate in deeper, on-point
conversations. And brands can leverage all of this to create hyper-targeted
advertising that speaks directly to their consumers. Which ties back to that
Amazon example I shared above.
As Kantar pointed out at their FragmentNation
event
, the marketplace is splintering — not with a whimper but with a
bang. So while the ad world should fear the Amazon in the room, it should also
embrace it. It’s an eye-opening reminder that consumers are advertising’s most
valuable assets in a marketplace that is more diverse and fragmented than ever.

Image Recognition and the Future of Digital Analytics

This post was originally
published
on Kelton Global’s Blog.

The days of text-centric social feeds are officially long
gone. A whopping 1.8 billion images are uploaded to the Internet daily
and of those, 350 million are shared on Facebook. Instagram recently
surpassed 500 million active users, and Snapchat now has more active users than Twitter. The content that flows
into our social feeds is more heavily optimized than ever to deliver more of
what people want’less text and more visuals.
Brands have adapted their social content strategies
accordingly by delivering more visually immersive experiences. And while we’re
seeing significant shifts in branded content, this influx of visual content has
yet to herald a commensurate change in social analytics. Accordingly, few gains
have been made to measure and derive insights from the contents of images or
video. Social listening has historically focused on the challenges of text-based
analysis’specifically, the challenge of determining the context and meaning
behind posts. But as social media habits evolve, it’s clear that deriving
insights from pictures is an increasingly important aspect of understanding
consumers. That’s where image recognition comes into play.
Brands have adapted
their social content strategies accordingly by delivering more visually
immersive experiences.

Simply put, image recognition is the process of translating
images to data. Photos and images can reveal a wealth of data
points’demographics, purchases, personalities, and behaviors (just to name a
few). Through next generation image recognition, a mere selfie may reveal a
person’s gender, approximate age, location disposition, and even the clothing
brands that the person is wearing. As text-centric media takes a backseat to
image and video, the opportunity to understand the contents of these formats
grows. These insights represent a veritable treasure trove of actionable data
for brands.
Tools that analyze image and video-based content are still
in development, but increased investment in research is already impacting
commercial products and how they’re advertised. One example is brand logo
recognition’scanning images for brand logos, and flagging them with the
corresponding brand names. This tool is especially powerful considering that 80% of photos shared online depict a brand logo but don’t
explicitly call out the brand’s name.
 This fact points to a sizable
opportunity for companies to measure and understand the impact of these formerly
inaccessible data points.
Photos and images can
reveal a wealth of data points’demographics, purchases, personalities, and
behaviors (just to name a few).

As an example of how this applies to brands, Kelton’s
Digital Analytics team took a look at the scores of backyard BBQ photos that
flooded public forums, blogs, and social feeds over the recent 4th of July
holiday. We experimented to see which of two quintessentially American beverage
brands’Coca-Cola and Budweiser’netted more published images of
patriotically-themed bottles and cans (as well as other forms of branding) on
social media.

In the end, Coca-Cola branding was twice as prominent as
Budweiser’s. We found that Coke bottles and cans popped up in more diverse
settings such as public parks and inside motor vehicles, whereas Budweiser was
predominantly found in bars and house parties. Coke also aroused greater
sentiment around the theme of Americana, as many consumers
photographed vintage Coca-Cola gear and opted for bottles over cans. This might
explain why Coke captured a significantly greater share of social mentions than
Budweiser.
This example illustrates several ways that brands can
leverage image recognition technology to build actionable insights:
??        
Ethnographic data ‘ Identify where, when
and how often brands are showing up in people’s lives.
??        
Updated brand health analysis ‘ We now have
a more comprehensive point of view of brands’ online footprint.
??        
Sponsorship and Branding ROI ‘ Extend the
value of branding and sponsorships shared via online news, blogs and social
media through a multiplier effect.
??        
Influencer identification ‘ Find authentic
brand advocates who consume and spotlight your merchandise.
??        
Misuse use of brand iconography ‘ Surface
content that depicts improper usage of brand’s logo or other creative assets.

In today’s ever-shifting social media landscape, it’s never
been more important for brands and their partners to stay aware of the new and
emerging capabilities that can help better understand consumers’ behavior
online. Image recognition is just the beginning. From AI startups to instant
objection recognition devices
, the mobilization and fusion of research,
tech, and capital is quickly reshaping the way we think about analytics. These
new tools will add even more contextual understanding to sentiment on social
platforms, empowering brands to understand consumers like never before.

Image Recognition and the Future of Digital Analytics

This post was
originally published on the Kelton
Global Blog
.

The days of text-centric social feeds are officially long
gone. A whopping 1.8 billion images are uploaded to the Internet daily
and of those, 350 million are shared on Facebook. Instagram recently
surpassed 500 million active users, and Snapchat now has more active users than Twitter. The content that flows
into our social feeds is more heavily optimized than ever to deliver more of
what people want’less text and more visuals.
Brands have adapted their social content strategies
accordingly by delivering more visually immersive experiences. And while we’re
seeing significant shifts in branded content, this influx of visual content has
yet to herald a commensurate change in social analytics. Accordingly, few gains
have been made to measure and derive insights from the contents of images or
video. Social listening has historically focused on the challenges of
text-based analysis’specifically, the challenge of determining the context and
meaning behind posts. But as social media habits evolve, it’s clear that deriving
insights from pictures is an increasingly important aspect of understanding
consumers. That’s where image recognition comes into play.
Brands have adapted their social content strategies
accordingly by delivering more visually immersive experiences.
Simply put, image recognition is the process of translating
images to data. Photos and images can reveal a wealth of data
points’demographics, purchases, personalities, and behaviors (just to name a
few). Through next generation image recognition, a mere selfie may reveal a
person’s gender, approximate age, location disposition, and even the clothing
brands that the person is wearing. As text-centric media takes a backseat to
image and video, the opportunity to understand the contents of these formats
grows. These insights represent a veritable treasure trove of actionable data
for brands.
Tools that analyze image and video-based content are still
in development, but increased investment in research is already impacting
commercial products and how they’re advertised. One example is brand logo
recognition’scanning images for brand logos, and flagging them with the
corresponding brand names. This tool is especially powerful considering that 80% of photos shared online depict a brand logo but don’t
explicitly call out the brand’s name.
 This fact points to a sizable
opportunity for companies to measure and understand the impact of these
formerly inaccessible data points.
Photos and images can reveal a wealth of data
points’demographics, purchases, personalities, and behaviors (just to name a
few).
As an example of how this applies to brands, Kelton’s
Digital Analytics team took a look at the scores of backyard BBQ photos that
flooded public forums, blogs, and social feeds over the recent 4th of July
holiday. We experimented to see which of two quintessentially American beverage
brands’Coca-Cola and Budweiser’netted more published images of
patriotically-themed bottles and cans (as well as other forms of branding) on
social media.

In the end, Coca-Cola branding was twice as prominent as
Budweiser’s. We found that Coke bottles and cans popped up in more diverse
settings such as public parks and inside motor vehicles, whereas Budweiser was
predominantly found in bars and house parties. Coke also aroused greater
sentiment around the theme of Americana, as many consumers
photographed vintage Coca-Cola gear and opted for bottles over cans. This might
explain why Coke captured a significantly greater share of social mentions than
Budweiser.
This example illustrates several ways that brands can
leverage image recognition technology to build actionable insights:
??        
Ethnographic data ‘ Identify where, when
and how often brands are showing up in people’s lives.
??        
Updated brand health analysis ‘ We now have
a more comprehensive point of view of brands’ online footprint.
??        
Sponsorship and Branding ROI ‘ Extend the
value of branding and sponsorships shared via online news, blogs and social
media through a multiplier effect.
??        
Influencer identification ‘ Find authentic
brand advocates who consume and spotlight your merchandise.
??        
Misuse use of brand iconography ‘ Surface
content that depicts improper usage of brand’s logo or other creative assets.

In today’s ever-shifting social media landscape, it’s never
been more important for brands and their partners to stay aware of the new and
emerging capabilities that can help better understand consumers’ behavior
online. Image recognition is just the beginning. From AI startups to instant
objection recognition devices
, the mobilization and fusion of research,
tech, and capital is quickly reshaping the way we think about analytics. These
new tools will add even more contextual understanding to sentiment on social
platforms, empowering brands to understand consumers like never before.

6 Tips Marketing Researchers Can Learn From Social Media

This post was
originally published on Lightspeed
GMI’s blog
.

Social media has caused a massive shift in the way people
communicate, interact and share experiences and personal interests. Consumers
are always on, always connected. Consumers build unique online relationships;
they are connected to brands, athletes, teams, family, friends and co-workers
on multiple channels. Sharing everything from political views to favorite
products, social media users are leaking valuable information and insights for
researchers to take advantage of.

Marketing researchers have adapted Mobile
First best practices
; but are we also looking to benefit from the same
openness and flexibility that social media platforms have to offer? There are
six ways to successfully engage and capture relevant and actionable
feedback from your panelists based on social media best practices:
1.      
Focus on
people, not metrics: Our
industry refers to panelists, not people. Are
we focusing on why individuals are dropping out of surveys? Are we worried
about their enjoyment of a survey or just survey completes? Create consumer
conversations, not metrics.  
2.      
Stay
authentic: 
According
to Digital Stats, 92% of consumers say they trust earned media like personal
recommendations above other forms of advertising.
 Authentic brands do
better on social media, but trust is earned over time. If you want to capture
genuine consumer insights, treat your online survey as you would a social media
account. Be honest and upfront about your intent.
3.      
Engage,
don’t push:
 Want to get better research? Consider the way you are
asking questions. Similiar to social media posts, consumers favor shorter,
visually appealing surveys with a strong narrative structure.Engage
your respondents first, ask questions later.
4.      
Let the
consumer decide:
video, text or photo? Social media platforms are
constantly evolving, but they always remain focused on consumer adoption. According
to Spinklr, marketers need to find new ways to capture the attention of the
consumer who has seen just about everything
. Every day, more and more
individuals are starting surveys on their mobile devices over PCs. They are
deciding when and what device to take the survey; why not let them decide on
the format? We design for cross-device research, so why not design
cross-format?
5.      
Be
relevant: 
Across Facebook, Twitter and Instagram, you want to reach
your target audience with relevant content ‘ photos, posts and videos. Like
social media, marketing research is a crowded space; panelists are flooded with
survey invites daily. Be relevant: ask
the right questions, in the right sequence to the right audience.
6.      
Interactions
first, technology second:
 Social media planning 101 = interactions
first, channel second. Allow your panelists, not technology, to drive the
future of the industry. Are marketing researchers allowing technology to
dictate the future or panelists? Are you focused on building mobile research
apps or consumer feedback apps?
Gaining success in social media isn’t easy; it’s a process,
a way of thinking. Social media can be used to create and collect customer
intelligence through listening techniques. And this can also ring true in the
online survey world. Think about it: Brands have the capacity to cultivate
conversations with consumers…but often don’t. Researchers who are successful
in gaining insights from surveys are the ones who allow the consumer to take
the wheel and drive how marketers can collect information from them. Platforms
such as Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Pinterest and Instagram allow users to be
creative and communicate in whatever method is enjoyable to them.  Why not
allow online panelists that same freedom? By allowing panelists to communicate
with you through mediums that are most enjoyable to them, through video for
example, you could garner more authentic and elaborate feedback. Rather than
force tedious or possibly challenging lengthy open text responses, try allowing
an option for using text or video responses. Instead of requiring respondents
to rate a product on a variety of features through a MaxDiff exercise, try
engaging them in conversation through communities or discussion boards.

The perfect solution for the survey world isn’t available in
140 characters or less, unfortunately. But the successes of social media are
ours to grow from.

This Week In Market Research: 7/20/15 – 7/24/15

There’s a new boss in town and guess who it is? The customer. Five or six years ago a marketing campaign was deemed successful if there was an increase in sales. Now a marketer is held to answer to the customer and their social media scrutiny. According to a recent article on Entrepreneur, ‘As customers’ voices become louder, and as they interact with brands in more ways, the modern marketer’s job has become a lot more visible and complex…’ This article discusses the 5 attributes that a marketer in today’s day and age must possess. Among the traits listed is ‘join today’s conversation.’ In other words, customers are having conversations everywhere on social media and marketers would benefit greatly from joining the conversation and providing useful content. With the world of marketing evolving and placing heavy importance on how the customer interacts with the campaign, these 5 attributes provide an insightful take on what it means to be a marketer today.
Imagine the place you work. More than likely images of cubicles, four white walls, printers, and break rooms are seeping into your mind. Now imagine a work setting with none of that. In fact imagine your work location being whatever you want it to be whether it’s your kitchen at home, inside a local coffee shop, or outside in the park. This incredible dream is actually a reality for Amir Salihefendic’s organization ‘Doist.’ Doist is an organization designed to manage any sort of to-do list. When Salihefendic took this idea to the next level at full-time capacity he realized he needed employees and couldn’t be picky about where they were located. The organization now employs 40 people from over 20 different countries. In the respect of market research do you think this could work to the organization’s advantage as a way of being more ‘global’? You decide.
What do you think has the fastest growing rate on social media? Is it Facebook? What about Twitter? If you guessed either of these two, I’m sorry to say, but you’re wrong. Instagram is actually growing faster than both of these platforms due to its engagement rates soaring. So if you’re a company like Tom’s from Maine, how do you get a coverage on this platform without an obvious visual appeal? Well, according to a recent Adage article, the Local Main company plans on turning to what is called

‘micro-influencers.’ In the Instagram world more and more companies are starting to make payments of $15,000 or more to Instagram ‘mega-influencers’ in order to have them post product photos to their millions of followers. However, in Tom’s approach, they are targeting ‘micro-influencers’ ‘who have maybe 1,000 to 5,000 followers but engage a very high percentage of them around a very specific topic.’ In other words, Tom’s will be reaching out to users who may not have an exuberant amount of followers, but have a rather heavy engagement with the followers they do have. To me this is a brilliant change in market strategy for Tom’s and one which will be interesting to follow (no pun intended).

Ivy Lee? Every heard of him? Well, he was a very successful businessman, the man considered to be the father of public relations, and the genius who will increase your productivity. According to his method for productivity, your business can reach peak productivity. Here’s how: 1. ‘At the end of each work day, write down the six most important things you need to accomplish tomorrow. Do not write more than six tasks. 2. Prioritize those six items in order of their importance. 3. When you arrive tomorrow, concentrate only on the first task. Work until the first task is finished and before moving on to the second task. 4. Approach the rest of your list in the same fashion. At the end of the

day, move any unfinished items to a new list of six tasks for the following day. 5. Repeat the process every working day.’ You may ask, ‘Why should we take his word? How do we know it works’? Well, back when Charles M. Schwab asked for Lee’s advice, Schwab asked how much it would cost him. Lee responded by saying, if it worked Schwab could pay him whatever he thought it was worth. Charles M. Schwab ended up giving him $25,000 dollars, which, back in 1918 is the equivalent of $400,000. Convinced?

Emojis: A Powerful Tool for Gathering Consumer Insights

We’ve come a long way from using :) or :s when trying to use
visual language in social media communication. Emoticons were adopted across
pretty much all the leading communication platforms and have evolved into what
we now know as emoji.
Emojis have evolved rapidly and now provide the opportunity
to let brands use custom emoji as a way to connect with consumers. They even
provide an opportunity to create huge PR buzz as was shown by Microsoft who
announced their new ‘flipping the bird’ emoji that will please grumpy people
across the world. The lewd gesture will come in all skin tones that will
appease those calling for diverse emojis and also is quite literally putting
the middle finger up at competitors, most notably Apple.
Emoji such as the new middle finger emoji show the shift
that has occurred that lets users replace words with visual language. Instagram
have tracked the massive increase in usage of the past few years and noticed
that certain slang terms are not used as much due to corresponding emoji being
adopted more regularly. The emotive implications and language that are implied
through emoji cross traditional language barriers and appear to be globally
understood. Understanding subtle nuances such as sarcasm in written language
can be tricky; visual language seems the natural answer to that problem. There
are such a wide range of emoji available that people can use simply only emoji
to create whole phrases or sentences such as shown below. Understand any of
them?
About six billion emojis are sent every day and are becoming
a powerful tool for gathering insights for brands. They represent every day
behavior and can reveal trends. Brands can track the language and emoji used in
relation to their products or industry in order to get a direct view of their
consumer’s opinions. Tracking emoji can capture people’s emotional connections
and behavior to give brands insights into their customers. This allows the
brand to feel more in contact with their customers.
Tracking emojis on platforms such as Instagram can give
incredibly up to date information on consumer opinions which can be used for
future consumer targeting. Emoji then could be another step forward in the
future of market research and consumer insights. However this still could be
aided by further development of emoji. There may be many already but a further
maturing could help to give more detailed insights. The range of expressions
can be expanded and a consistency of meaning is vital in the future of this
innovative idea. The tracking across multiple platforms will need to be updated
with technological advancements in order to get a broader understanding of
emoji usage.
The end result could mean a new way to follow the exchange
of ideas and feelings, that ultimately will bring brands closer to the people
they want to reach. 
About the Author:
Harry Kempe, a marketing intern at IIR USA, who works on various aspects of the
industry including social media, marketing analysis and media. He is a recent
graduate of Newcastle University who previously worked for EMAP Ltd. and WGSN as
a marketing assistant on events such as the World Architecture Festival, World
Retail Congress and Global Fashion Awards. He can be reached at hkempe@IIRUSA.com.

Can Researchers Join The Social Video Party?

Social media has been a part of our lives for about
a decade now (maybe more if you were an avid MySpace or
Friendster user), but still there appear to be few research companies harnessing its true
power to get in touch with consumers and capture their opinions in real time.
On the topic of new social tech, there is an abundance of pushback. “What is the data telling me?” “How can it be coded/normalized/interpreted?” “Does it fit with our current approach?” “How can I filter inappropriate content?” — these are just a few of the many valid concerns around using new media in research. Social data is unstructured, and doesn’t give us access to probe users in the way we might
in our current research platforms, both in the qual and quant world.
But are we leaving something on the table? Can we leverage the fact that hundreds of millions of people are on Instagram, willing to share their lunch with you, show you what their #OOTD (Outfit Of The Day) is? Don’t we want to know what consumers
are eating and wearing?
A newcomer on the social scene that has my gears turning is Periscope. The app lets users live stream video from their mobile device, and lets their followers on Twitter know when a broadcast begins. Could we tap into an app that is already gaining popularity (it made headlines for amassing 1 million users in only 10 days), and let the consumer tell us when she is ready to take us along for a
shopping trip, brush her teeth, or engage in whatever ritual/experience we are interested in?
What is this couple shopping for? I bet they’d be willing to show you!
There is no question that logistical issues abound, to which I say “bring it on”. This is what we in the online MR space do daily — tackle logistical and technical issues to get access to our consumers where they work, live, and play. 
As an industry we are creative enough to sort out the logistics, and researchers everywhere should be paying attention to an app which, on its homepage, implores us to “Explore the world through someone else’s eyes

About the Author:
Anthony Germinario is Director of Technical Product Management at BuzzBack, where he is focused on developing
and integrating unique respondent and reporting experiences for online
research. He has earned his PMP certification and holds a B.S.B.A from Boston
University’s Questrom School of Business. You can keep up with him on Twitter @AGermBB and on LinkedIn, as well as
on BuzzBack’s blog

How Social Media is Becoming More Focused on Visuals

How many Snapchats have you sent within the last hour? When was the last time you chatted on the phone or saw the recipient in person? Snapchat is quickly becoming the new means for communication as the enticing image based, concise text focused, app allows users to conveniently keep in touch. While traditional advertising via TV, billboard, and radio are ongoing, advertising through a platform where users have chosen to accept ads and want to see them can bring effectiveness to another level. Consumers barely look up from their phones when walking the streets’ or even driving, for that matter. What are they looking at? Snapchat, Instagram, Facebook- apps that require minimal mental engagement yet provide short and fast entertainment while walking down the street.
With about one in three millennials currently using the platform, it only makes sense for brands to step in and capitalize on the situation. Unique and eye-capturing content is the only route to take when trying to engage with consumers via the time constricting app. Snapchat allows marketers to connect with fans in a simple yet memorable way with the advantage of prompting impulse purchases due to the fact that the message will quickly vanish!
 Photo credit: LA Times.Business

From ‘snapping’ coupons to consumers to offering sneak-peaks, this type of marketing is on the rise and will only continue to grow as these real-time, image-based apps emerge. Now lies a great opportunity to step in and start a trend of connecting with consumers before it too becomes commonplace.
Furthermore, Instagram has also become a great source for advertising. There is so much that can be captured in an image and distributed to ‘followers’ that allow this platform to take giant strides in a marketing sense.
In choosing to ‘follow’ a certain brand, the user commits to seeing all image posts that brand populates. In the consumer’s eye, the brand must narrow down their single post to the best, most memorable and action inducing image and/or saying to capture the attention of the user. In doing so, the consumer is no longer bombarded by continuous and exhausting ads as that ended up in ‘un-liking’ a brand’s Facebook page in the past. Instagram creates a visually appealing platform for consumers to glance down at and connect to while on-the go.
Gain a competitive advantage by seeing who your followers follow. What other companies are they following? What are they posting? Any potential partnerships? How will you incorporate these ever-growing trends into your marketing plan?
Janel Parker, Market Research Consultant at SKIM, an international consultancy and marketing research agency, has a background in Marketing and Psychology from Cornell University. Her previous experience at a social media agency combined with her knowledge from SKIM provide for a unique understanding of the relationships between social media and marketing. She can be reached at j.parker@skimgroup.com.

Data to See: A Design Approach to Data Visualization & Storytelling

As a fan of the arts, my mother instilled in me a love for poetry, literature, arts and drama, overall the ability to tell a story that resonates on a deep level. It’s the presence of those universal, humanistic properties, those boiled down to the core or gist that really get us and that we really get.

I think this early understanding fueled my ability to write poetry and later on in life, as a marketer, tweets. In the past year, I’ve become fascinated with the appeal of the visual web and experiment on Instagram, often posting powerful images with very little text, sometimes 1-3 words and/or hashtags and nothing else to see what sort of resonance they receive.

While researching data visualization tools and tactics, I came across this free film by Edward Tufte, and while its a few years old, I think it’s definitely worth watching for those interested in further developing their visual data narrative skills and thinking conceptually with the mind and empathy of a trained designer or artist:

Inge Druckrey: Teaching to See from Edward Tufte on Vimeo.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

 
Valerie RussoFormerly a senior copy editor at Thomson Reuters, a research editor at AOL,  and a senior web publicist at Hachette Book GroupValerie M. Russo is editor at large of The Front End of Innovation BlogThe Market Research Event BlogThe World Future Trends Tumblr, the Digital Impact Blog, and also blogs at Literanista.net. She is the innovation lead and senior social media strategist for the Marketing and Business Strategy Division of the Institute for International Research, an Informa LLC., and her poetry was published in Regrets Only on sale at the MOMA Gift Shop. Her background is in Anthropology and English Literature. You can reach her at vrusso@iirusa.com or @Literanista.

TMRE 2013 Video: 5 Shocking Trends That Will Change the Way You Do Business

Constant change at a rapidly accelerating pace is upon us. How you, as a research company or a client-sider, plan to allocate your time and money in order to keep up with the pace of change is becoming an increasingly tricky equation. Here are a few things you should note about the pace of change.

Wynne Tyree is the Founder and President of Smarty Pants and discusses her findings in this presentation available here (Run time: 00:36:16). The five trends she discusses in this encore session are:

1. Facebook is Dead – Young people are leaving Facebook for other apps such as Snapchat or Instagram. The reason for this being is the invasion of parents onto Facebook and as a result young teens are leaving for more private apps.

It is important to note that these millennials are not deactivating Facebook, they are just using it differently.


2. Zero TV Households – This doesn’t necessarily mean that a household doesn’t own a TV, it just means they do not pay for cable.

In fact, 75% of these households own TVs they just use other means to get TV such as Hulu or Netflix.

3. Bigger is Normal – This trend deals with the obesity problem in America and is a problem because becoming heavier is the new norm in America.

Almost 70% of adults are overweight or obese, and this is setting a bad example for our nations youth. Most of the top brands in the U.S. (28/50) are nutritionally weak and this is not helping the problems.

4. Dads Are Important – The number of stay at home dads has doubled in recent years. Dads have their own unique style of parenting and are available to be targeted.

Also, 50% of dads do grocery shopping for the family and this is another area to target dads.

5. What Does The Fox Say: This YouTube video is funny and random and that is the trend. The fact that there is no point and that anyone can create content is what makes this a trend.

This video and videos like it are open to interpretation and are connecting people because they are funny in a different way for every individual.

About the Author:
Ryan Polachi is a contributing writer concentrating his
focus on Marketing, Finance and Innovation. He can be reached at rpolachi@IIRUSA.com.