Tag Archives: Innovation

Category Insights: Rainy Day Segments #12 And #35

It isn’t often that marketers get to blaze a trail through
an entirely new consumer category ‘ rolling out brand identities and category
signifiers from scratch ‘ but legal marijuana offers just such an opportunity.
Except, as Emily Paxhia of Poseidon Asset Management ‘ a
firm that invests heavily in the budding industry ‘ pointed out in her
fascinating TMRE presentation, marijuana isn’t an entirely new category. The
rich cultural history of the herb in America is something the marijuana
industry has to negotiate as it tries to create an identity that appeals to a
new, more diverse generation of smokers.
Even the word ‘smoker’ is part of the drug’s heritage, not
its present ‘ marijuana users are as, if not more, likely to get high by
vaping, edibles, or topical lotions and patches. Marketers are faced with a
whole legacy vocabulary designed by the authorities to put people off
marijuana, not draw them in. They have to weed out phrases like ‘recreational’ ‘
with its negative drug war connotations. Most of all, they have to contend with
the Cheech and Chong or slacker-era image of the lazy stoner, something that
puts modern marijuana users on the defensive.

Weed culture: from this…

So who are these new users? Paxhia had the figures. 65%
male, 84% employed, average age 30, mostly well-off, and roughly evenly split
between the major political parties. Most strikingly, only 31% of users claimed
they used pot to ‘get stoned’ ‘ but 95% agreed that they used the drug to be
more present in the moment, and in the ethnographic part of the study they shared
stories of how mundane activities from cleaning to fishing to dog walking were
enhanced by cannabis. As Paxhia put it, these people are checking in, not
dropping out. Everybody must get centered.
This wholesale adoption of the language of mindfulness was
the biggest indication of what made this talk so fascinating. Branded Marijuana
‘ the unbranded stuff still does a brisk trade, I believe – is a very modern
category: it’s created by and for younger consumers, and fairly wealthy and bohemian
ones at that. So it conforms almost entirely to what they expect ‘ or what marketers
expect they expect – from consumer goods. Legal pot is artisanal, tastefully
designed, social, inventive and experiential.
Paxhia reported, for instance, that in San Francisco, chefs
and ‘budtenders’ are collaborating on private pairing parties where the
traditionally close relationship between weed and food can be explored in a
more upscale manner. The entire industry is being created along the principles
of post mass-marketing: it’s a trendwatcher’s dream.
Of course, most consumer goods categories balance modern
marketing approaches with a legacy of how things were done in the 20th
century. But while beer, say, struggles to reconcile the Craft-aware kids it
wants to sell to with the Bud-chugging masses it always has sold to, marijuana
gets to make a clean break. It’s at pains to reject its underground image as
corny or childish. No more Reefer Madness ‘ brands like Kiva and Goodship are
almost defensively tasteful. ‘It’s commonplace in the finance business’ said
one earnest young enthusiast, to the sound of weeping from Jerry Garcia’s
unquiet ghost.

…to this: Leafs By Snoop.

But what’s also interesting is that the real breadheads are
staying away. Legal pot is ‘ so far ‘ growing without much input from risk
averse corporations. Celebrities are getting involved: Snoop Dogg has a brand, naturally, though
older consumers recalling the sleeve art to Doggy Style may be disappointed
that it looks as discreet as any other. And the market is set to expand, with
legal marijuana propositions on the ballot in multiple states this November.
But for now, the legal weed industry has a unique, boutique
flavour. It is changing rapidly ‘ the marijuana industry moves in ‘dog years’,
as time in it seems to pass much faster (another departure from tradition). So
the business is collectively getting to grips with issues around portion
control, regulation, and packaging information ‘ a dramatically steep learning
curve. The legal cannabis products of even two years ago look a lot more
homespun and less sophisticated than those on sale now.
In the process, it’s not just marijuana’s past that’s being
rejected. The future that stoners used to imagine for legal pot ‘ paranoid images
of Joe Camel with spliff in hand as Big Tobacco got its claws into weed ‘ has manifestly
not come to pass. Paxhia’s 420-degree overview of the category she passionately
loves showed that instead it’s a unique test bed for the new norms and assumptions of

Innovation: When It Pays To Take Things Slow

On Day 2 of TMRE, in the Innovation Track, a case study presentation
by Sargento Foods inadvertently illuminated one of the big issues in
innovation: the gulf between how we talk about it, and how it actually happens.
The track chairs, Michael Laux and Thania Farrar of Burke,
kicked the session off with the former, a chart showing the ever accelerating
pace of technological innovation. It was the kind of chart that shows the
electric lightbulb and the steam engine as less dramatic advances than the iPad
‘ but it made its point. This is how people in our industry talk innovation ‘
as an ever-accelerating hamster wheel of change on which brands must spin or
fall off.
But is that really how innovation works? Michelle Monkoski
and Barbara Kilcoyne of cheese giant Sargento implied a rather different view ‘
where patience and timing, not frantic acceleration, are the keys to innovating
against consumer trends.
Their case study focused on Sargento’s Cheese Medleys
product, a proposed 2004 launch which mixed cheese, nuts and fruit in packs.
Cheese Medleys boasted an array of benefits ‘ a high-protein snack with healthy
ingredients, perfect for on-the-go consumers. It was a ‘balance snack’, where
buyers didn’t have to choose between great taste and nutrition.  But if you’re struggling to picture it,
though, don’t worry: in testing, Cheese Medleys was a failure. The benefits
simply didn’t connect with consumers.
Sargento cares about consumer trends, though. It has an
annual trend day ‘ called Trendscape ‘ whose results feed into R&D, Sales,
Category Management, Marketing and Business Development. Through its consumer
trend work ‘ based on research and on thinking outside the category box ‘ it could
see trends coming down the pipe like a new interest in the health benefits of
protein, like ‘snackification’ and greater demand for one-the-go food, and like
a rethinking of what ‘healthy’ food is.
This last trend was particularly crucial ‘ it represented a
shift in the consumer mindset from reactive health to proactive health. With
reactive health, you try to cut out the bad stuff. With proactive health, you
try and embrace the good stuff. Ideas of balance, of real and wholesome
ingredients, and of freshness came back into play.

An idea whose time had come.

These were exactly the kind of trends that Cheese Medleys
had been designed to appeal to. And now they were heading into the mainstream.
So, eight years on from the poor performance of Cheese Medleys, Sargento
designed and launched Balanced Breaks. The same basic concept, but now the
trends it addressed were more familiar and recognisable to consumers.
Sargento left little to chance. Everything from the flavours
to the semiotics of the package ‘ designed to remind consumers of a yin-yang
sign and suggest balance ‘ was carefully considered before launch. And Balanced
Breaks proved to be an idea whose time had come ‘ it’s been a success,
outperforming expectations for Sargento.
The philosophy Sargento applied for this successful
innovation is a simple but powerful one. You need three things. You need a
strong brand. You need on-point trend identification. And you need the right
timing and meaningful activation
for consumers.
In other words, successful innovation for a mass market
brand isn’t always about the headlong rush towards novelty. It’s also a waiting
game. You sometimes need to patiently wait until the trends your idea speaks to
are sufficiently mainstream and recognisable among consumers for your launch to
succeed. As the presenters said, ‘Don’t be afraid to take a new look at an old
That’s not the glamorous route to innovation at the bleeding
edge. But it works.

Innovation In A Change-Phobic World

By: Tom Ewing, Senior Direct, BrainJuicer Labs

Sometimes it takes a huge event to make people look at their
assumptions in a new light. Taken by surprise by the EU Referendum and
Brexit, British marketers have had to think carefully about how well
they knew the people they were selling to. And, as a fascinating new study
by the Futures Company points out, it’s not just a British thing. All
over Europe and beyond there are vast groups of consumers who feel a
sense of loss in the face of change, and respond strongly to the
familiar. As in politics, so in marketing: for a big chunk of the public, novelty and disruption aren’t particularly big draws.

Of course, this is why innovation research so often focuses on early adopters: get them on board, and diffusion across the population will follow. This is the innovation equivalent of trickle-down economics – an excuse to focus on a segment you’re sympathetic to with the hope that everyone else will benefit… eventually. After all, marketers themselves tend to be novelty-seeking types who talk a big game about
the inevitability of change. Forcing them to put themselves in the shoes of more
conservative or change-averse consumers can be a wrench. But change-aversion isn’t something you can sweep under the segmentation rug. Because while
history may be on the side of change, psychology isn’t.

As human beings we are wired to prefer the familiar: if we recognize
something quickly, it seems like a better choice. This processing
fluency heuristic – or just Fluency, for short – is one of the foundations of decision-making. And it’s used by every consumer to make judgements, not just those who are culturally or politically averse to change.

The Futures Company’s recommendation to appeal to the nostalgic or
conservative consumer is ‘cautious innovation’ ‘ balancing
future-focused new product lines with more immediately familiar ones.
This is sound thinking. But given that everyone ‘ not just the
change-averse ‘ uses Fluency to make decisions ‘ it’s only half the
story. Familiarity isn’t just for nostalgists. The key thing to realise
about Fluency is that you can build it.

If you use research to identify your brand’s unique assets ‘ the things people most
immediately associate with it ‘ you can build that into how you present
your innovations. This works for the radically new as well as the cosily
familiar: you can ‘bake in’ new assets which the launch and promotional
campaigns can lean heavily on.

When the iPod was first launched, for instance, it was certainly
disruptive new technology. But Apple’s marketing around it didn’t
emphasise the tech, or its many features ‘ it relied on the simple image
of those distinctive white headphones. The white headphones became such
a well-known symbol of the iPod that at least one police force issued
warnings against them ‘ as criminals were targeting anyone they saw
wearing a set. A brand’s unique assets in action!

With investment and focus, brand assets can become familiar very
quickly. In the UK, banking giant Santander was a newcomer only a few
years ago. Now it’s carved out a large chunk of market share, and ‘owns’
the colour red, thanks to pushing it as an asset in its marketing. But
heritage can certainly play a role. There are many brands whose vaults
are stuffed with distinctive assets which were put to pasture because of
a new-broom marketing director, not because the public was tired of
Whether you’re launching something new or looking to the past,
though, it’s crucial to remember that familiarity and Fluency are at the
root of all successful innovation ‘ not just the cautious kind.

Carol Cunningham and Oliver Hayward: Disrupting Market Research Through Innovation

The Next Gen Market Research Award recognizes companies and individuals that have demonstrated outstanding leadership as change agents and made significant contributions to harnessing disruptive innovation to drive research industry progress. In 2015, NGMR teamed up with Women in Research (WIRe) to encourage their members to submit nominations. What happened was unprecedented – not only were there a huge number of submissions, but over 58% of them ended up being from women. Two winners of this highly competitive race were interviewed by The Research Insighter – you can see the full interview here. Each gives their strategy and motivation for doing what they do every day. Not only is their work completely innovative, it is also apparent that they do what they do out of a passion for their customers and even for the greater good.

Carol Cunningham VP of Consumer Insights and Business Strategy, BET

Carol Cunningham, Vice President of Consumer Insights and Business Strategy for Black Entertainment Television (BET) won the prestigious Individual Achievement Award. Cunningham’s work exemplifies “insight” as she applies a combination of sophisticated data and analytics skills, over 20 years of practical experience and sociological expertise about our current society to her strategies.

Carol Cunningham: “I think a lot of what I am doing at BET is about stealth innovation. Really focusing on being a change agent. I am probably one of the unique people who sits at the intersection between big data and also insights, I do a little bit of both.

My primary goal is to make sure that I give dimension to the African American consumer, change perceptions and sometimes stereotypes. We do it through a variety of different things, we have a lot of quantitative research studies that we do. Everything is to find out and probe and figure out who these consumers are, why they’re important, why they’re impactful, for any business to embrace. At the end of it we’re really trying to help people understand them a little bit more intimately.’

When asked what the greatest challenge Cunningham had in her role, her answer was surprising. (It isn’t bringing the right data together to tell the story which seems to be the number one problem most market researchers face.)

Carol Cunningham:
“I think one of the biggest challenges we have is that we have to constantly go in and educate people about who this consumer segment is, what they represent, how they can actually keep your business in the black if you really focus on embracing them.
A lot of what I end up doing is helping people see them beyond what they know.
So we will do studies on the color of beauty because one of the things that we know is that African Americans really do have their fingers on the pulse of what’s hot, what’s next and what matters. And they really are cultural catalysts and we need to have people understand that more.”

Oliver Hayward, partner at Global brand consulting agency Hall & Partners received the NGMR award for Innovative Research Deployment. If you haven’t heard of Hayward’s innovative work and you’re a market researcher  – well you may have just had all your prayers answered. While it has become a highly valued skill set to be able to actually figure out what data to put together in this “new world” of market research, Hayward is a few steps ahead of the rest. What Hayward is developing is a way for you to not only not have to dive into hundreds of spreadsheets, but you don’t even have to do the powerpoint anymore (which Hayward half-jokingly asserts no one reads anyway.) Here’s Hayward to more articulately describe what The Hub will do for the market research industry.

Oliver Hayward: ‘I look after a platform called The Hub; it’s a digital tool for helping our clients and researchers. It helps our clients who are drowning in data. We believe there’s a lot of value to be gained from ‘small data’ the data you already have within your organization. Our mission is to help our clients manage that data, spend less time chasing data and more time on extracting the valuable layer of insight.

I am excited about the notion of storytelling. A lot of tools do a very good job of helping people get to the story but don’t do a good job of helping them tell that story. Our main focus for next year is around journalism, helping people within the platform publish well written engaging short copy stories that can engage people across the business. We know in reality people don’t open big powerpoint reports, and one of the challenges our clients have is getting their stakeholders to look at the data, let alone use it.” So basically what Hayward is developing is a complete report you can give to stakeholders that will both show and explain the market research data, in story form. You can keep an eye out for this to come to fruition here.

What these two innovators have shown is not only an expertise in their field, but a drive to push the limits of what market research is and can do for business.  Want to learn about more disruptors in market research? 2016 NGMR winners will be announced at TMRE this October!

From the Early Days of the Internet to Crowdsourcing, Market Research Innovator Olga Diamandis Shares Her Journey

The Research Insighter spoke with market research innovator Olga Patel Diamandis this spring, and Diamandis gave a fascinating personal historical perspective on how technology has changed market research since the 1990s. You can watch the entire video here.

Diamandis began their chat with an explanation of her background: ‘I’ve spent over 20 years in research and innovation. I started at Procter & Gamble where I received very classical training in research methodologies and I progressed into an insights and innovation role, that’s where I was at the end of my eleven years there. I moved to Nestl?? to their strategic innovation unit to head up the insight function there. Most recently I was at Mars and then Mattell (she’s now at Smuckers).”

The Research Insighter: ‘Taking stock of the research landscape today, the field and the industry are in the throes of some pretty dramatic changes. Where do you see the greatest challenges and opportunities? What are you watching and paying attention to?”
Olga Patel Diamandis: ‘The market research industry is going through tremendous changes right now; a number of them driven by the exponential growth in various technologies: social media, digital, computer programming, machine learning, artificial intelligence, crowdsourcing, you name it.
This is something that’s very new to all the researchers who are more used to traditional techniques. So I think the biggest challenge for us as researchers is to adapt to that and take the opportunities that all these challenges are bringing.”

The Research Insighter: “Can you give an example of a technological or methodological innovation or novel approach that you put to work for you?”
Olga Patel Diamandas: “Information technology is driving a lot of these changes. At Mattel – we built a crowdsourcing platform, (creating) that was not possible 5 years ago. We had a community of loyal consumers participate in it and provide their ideas and comments to us.  
Crowdsourcing as agile, immediate and reliable market research
We ran several challenges where we asked them to help us develop a brand – ‘Little People’ line, looking for our next characters. (Crowdsourcing) took much less time than it would have in a traditional market research approach. The results came from our very involved consumers, and we knew right away that they would resonate.”

Unless you adapt you are not going to move forward
The Research Insighter: “How was this experience for someone who was classically trained in market research?”
Olga Patel Diamandis: “I learned to adapt over my career. I realize that unless you adapt you are not going to move forward. I am fascinated by all the changes and opportunities that technologies are bringing. And our consumers are changing too because of these technologies. That are affecting their lives.

Market researchers are curious by nature
We researchers are curious by nature, we have to be, that’s how we derive those insights.
When we talk about innovation, it’s important to understand that we’re not just talking about products and services. We’re talking about innovation in our research methods. We cannot do the same thing over and over and expect different results. We have to adapt as the industry adapts.
The Research Insighter: “There’s a lot of resistance to change in quarters of research. What would you say to those in the market research industry who are skeptical or hesitant to adopt some of the new emerging areas that are quite outside our comfort zone, and …a bit scary such as artificial intelligence?”

In the late 1990s, critics were quite skeptical about the internet in market research
Olga Patel Diamandis: “Going back to the late 1990s when the internet came to be… As market researchers we talked about how it would be impossible to run an online questionnaire, there’s so many things that could be wrong with it.
You don’t know who the respondent is, you don’t know how robust the program or is if the results are same as pencil and paper or telephone. I remember we were at Procter & Gamble and we deliberated for three years whether the internet was something that could be used.
We started to run mega survey studies in two ways, online and our old way.

The data did not match.
People respond online in a much more truthful way, they are more themselves.
We adapted, but it was not easy to change our attitude towards it.
My advice is we have no choice we have to adapt, changes are coming and we can’t prevent them from happening.”

We’re excited to say that Olga Patel Diamandis will be speaking at The Market Research event, and on a very interesting topic: the future of food as it relates to dogs and humans.
If you’re interested in hearing more from Diamandis and other technological innovators in the market research industry, don’t miss the world’s leading market research event TMRE happening in beautiful Boca Raton, Florida October 17-20. Got any comments on this blog? Make yourself heard – Tweet to us at @TMRE!

Don’t miss KNect365′s Fall 2016 Event Lineup!

Can you feel it? Fall is in the air, and so is conference
We’re excited to announce our fall 2016 event schedule of 10
Insights, Marketing and Innovation events produced for you to do your job
Our goal through these events is to inspire, inform, and
connect you with leaders from across industries to see, think, and act
Check out the full
event lineup:

TMRE: The Market Research Event
Boca Raton, FL
October 17-20
Use code TMRE16BL for $100 off the current rate.
Buy Tickets: http://bit.ly/2bjGsUg
The Corporate Intrapreneur Summit
New York, NY
September 8-9
Use code INTRA16BL for $100 off the current rate.
Buy Tickets: http://bit.ly/2bDaaBs
Foresight & Trends
Miami Beach, FL
September 27-29
Use code FT16BL for $100 off the current rate.
Buy Tickets: http://bit.ly/2brD48C
Future of Food Summit
Miami Beach, FL
September 27
Use code FT16BL for $100 off the current rate.
Buy Tickets: http://bit.ly/2bSbIIn
FEI:Front End of Innovation Europe
Berlin, Germany
October 5-7
Use code FEIEU16BL for $100 off the current rate.
Buy Tickets: http://bit.ly/2bmcbAW
LEAN Startup in the Enterprise
Hoboken, NJ
October 24-25
Use code LEAN16BL for $100 off the current rate.
Buy Tickets: http://bit.ly/2bQEqJH
Back End of Innovation
New Orleans, LA
November 15-17
Use code BEI16BL for $100 off the current rate.
Buy Tickets: http://bit.ly/2bjHn79
OmniShopper International
London, England
November 15-17
Use code OMNIINTL16BL for $100 off the current rate.
Buy Tickets: http://bit.ly/2bjI943
ProjectWorld & World Congress for Business Analysts
Orlando, FL
November 15-17
Use code PW16BL for $100 off the current rate.
Buy Tickets: http://bit.ly/2bEmcid
FUSE London
London, England
November 30-December 2
Use code PW16BL for $100 off the current rate.
Buy Tickets: http://bit.ly/2bmdNuB
We hope you will join us at one of our events this fall!
The KNect365 Insights, Marketing and Innovation Team

5 Ways Traditional Market Researchers Can Stay Relevant

By: Amanda Ciccatelli,
Content Marketing & Social Media Strategist, Informa
Insights have become a vehicle for influencing marketing and
ultimately, the world. That’s why we asked Adam Coleman, Director, Consumer and
Market Research, Microsoft, for his advice to traditional researchers on
staying relevant in the changing market research and consumer insights space.
Here is his advice:
Experiment with new approaches to solving problems ‘ use the 70/20/10 model
to look at your budgets and spend at least 10% of dollars (if you can) on
trialing side by side tests.
Multiple Data Sources.
Ensure you are using (or assessing) multiple data
sources which may require you to ‘up’ your collaboration skills with teams you
may not previously have thought you’d need to work with. Particularly as Social
Intelligence and Behavioral data come to the fore.
Get experience to get comfortable with these new types of data
sources so you have at least an educated understanding of them and their
limitations/advantages – don’t get left behind.
Attention to Innovation.
Don’t jump to use the first new shiny approach you
see! There is so much innovation going on that a new firm, or one of the bigger
firms with Innovation at the center, may have a better solution. Increase your
networking with industry peers, or meet with other non-competitive firms who
you can share new thinking with.
Forget the Core Principles of Research.
Don’t get away from what are core
principles of research, whatever the data or information formats ‘ Continue to
ask yourself these types of questions: Do we have research learning or are
there secondary sources that can already answer the question? Is it
representative of the audience, market, or other requirement? What level of
confidence do we need to answer the question ‘ hence, can we assess the
significance to the level we need? Does it truly answer the business question
at hand?
‘The world of product development and marketing has simply sped
up in almost all industries,’ Coleman explained. ‘There are more choices for
customers every day, and more and more smaller competitors coming into markets
they were not in before. Keeping ahead of the competitive threats and
responding quickly requires even more agility without losing the appropriate
research quality needed to help guide decisions.’

Insights, Marketing & Innovation 2016 Event Line-up

Designing Brands
with Purpose
April 4-6, 2016
Nobu Eden Roc, Miami, FL
The pressure to connect consumers and brands is more
meaningful than ever before. Those who can make the connection are thriving and
those who cannot are fading away. FUSE is the only event focused on design as a
strategic force in your quest to build brands and businesses that connect
beyond compare with consumers.
Use code FUSE16BL for $100 off the current rate.
Insight Immersion:
The New Value
April 20-21, 2016
Join a select group of brand and agency leaders, and dive
deep into an experience of consumer culture that will inform, inspire and
energize you.  We take you into the vibrant streets of New York City
to explore current marketplace trends, discover buzzworthy brand
spaces, interact with insightful experts, participate in unexpected
experiences and uncover valuable insights that will dramatically benefit your
FEI: Front End of
Inspiration Needs
May 10-12, 2016
Seaport World Trade Center, Boston, MA
FEI is a conference that senior level R&D,
Innovation, and Product Development executives rely on to thwart the growing
threat of disruption by non-traditional competitors. Large organizations are
under fire to be more agile and opportunistic in their approach to innovation,
adaptation, and disruption. That’s why the 2016 curriculum is designed to help
systematically tackle the innovation process- from ideation through execution-
in order to capture immense innovation.
Use code FEI16BL for $100 off the current rate.

The New Face of Consumer Insights: TMRE
in Focus
Are You Ready for
the New Face of Consumer Insights?
May 23-25, 2016
Ritz Carlton, Marina Del Ray, CA
The producers of TMRE: The Market Research Event arm you
with the new processes, procedures, frameworks and skillsets you need to remain
competitive and relevant. Rethink how your insights teams are structured, how
the back end and operations of research must evolve and harness game-changing
skills to deliver value both internally and to end customers.
Use code INSIGHTS16BL for $100 off the current rate.

Marketing Analytics & Data Science
Unlock Opportunity
and Growth
Jun 8-10, 2016
Hilton, Financial District, San Francisco, CA
The Marketing Analytics and Data Science conference is an
inaugural conference that demonstrates how to deploy marketing analytics and
data science to drive business forward. The conference offers a unique platform
for experts across industries to learn, collaborate and share best practices in
data science, IoT, marketing analytics, and more.
Use code MADS16BL for $100 off the current rate.
Insight Immersion:
The Internet of
June 15-16, 2016
Join a select group of brand and agency leaders, and dive
deep into an experience of consumer culture that will inform, inspire and
energize you.  We take you into the vibrant streets of New York City
to explore current marketplace trends, discover buzzworthy brand
spaces, interact with insightful experts, participate in unexpected
experiences and uncover valuable insights that will dramatically benefit your
Insight &
Activation Strategies that Define the Future of Retail
July 10-13, 2016
Radisson Blu, Chicago, IL
OmniShopper 2016 is a world-class experience focused on
how to translate shopper insights into dramatic growth opportunities for your
business – anticipate and predict the future, generate fresh insights, create
seamless and connected brand experiences along the complex shopper journey and
increase basket growth at every opportunity – in-store, mobile and online.
Use code OMNI16BL for $100 off the current rate.

Foresight & Trends
Save the Date: September 27-19, 2016
Foresight and Trends is for those within innovation, strategic
planning and insight that are charged with setting the vision for their
department and the overall business. FT explores macro trends that are/will
impact all industries and reveals how companies are converting these trends and
global shifts into something ACTIONABLE.
Marketing Research Event
Connecting You to the Best in Insights from Around the
October 17-20, 2016
Boca Raton Resort & Club, Boca Raton, FL
Translating insights into bottom line impact and
demonstrating the NEW business value of research is the holy grail. Level up
your skillset and ensure insights remain indispensable to your business.
Seismic shifts are banging at your door. Drive your future and shape the
industry’s future at TMRE: The Market Research Event.
Use code TMRE16BL for $100 off the current rate.
We hope to see you at one of our conferences in 2016!

The IIR Insights, Marketing & Innovation Team

Call for Presenters for TMRE Next: The New Face of Consumer Insights

We are currently seeking presenters for:
TMRE Next: The New Face of Consumer Insights
May 2016, West Coast
Deadline: Wednesday, December 9th
*Please note this call for papers is ONLY for Client side
companies. If you are a consultant, solution provider, vendor interested in
speaking on the 2016 program please scroll to the bottom of this email for
details on how to submit.
Formerly knowns at InsighTech – TMRE Next: The New Face of
Consumer Insights is an in-depth follow-up to The Market Research Event (TMRE)
2015. This program will show how to action key hot topics and themes explored
at TMRE 2015. The content presented at this event will evolve the skill sets of
those within market research and consumer insights so that they can remain
competitive and relevant. It explores what’s next in consumer insights and what
it means for you. Key areas explored include: Collaboration, Re-thinking skill
sets necessary for success, Innovations in market research & consumer
insights, setting up your organization and team for success, re-framing the
problem, actionable frameworks, storytelling and a variety of sessions showing
you how research projects were executed and what it means for you.
We are looking for NEW workshops, case studies and
interactive experiences that can be ACTIONED. All sessions need to clearly show
the “how to” behind the content presented.
See below for specifics. Have another idea? Let us know -
anything is possible.
1. Deep Dive Case Studies: Have a NEW story to share? We are
looking for deep dive case studies that will show: What you tried, what worked,
what didn’t and what you recommend. Can you share a real life research project
success story? Tell us how it was executed?
2. Workshops: Do you have a hands on workshop that could help
market researchers evolve their skill set? Understand new frameworks? Show them
how to use new tools?   
We are looking for presentations in the areas listed below as
well as any other areas/topics that you think would be a great addition to the
2016 program.
1. Prioritizing
2. Data Visualization
3. Talking to C-Suite
4. Text Analysis- How to make things useful
6. Moving people to be an independent thinkers
7. Tracking Progress
8. Collaboration :Collaboration strategies to integrate all
sources of data – collaborate across different units to ensure impact of
9. Your Strategy for Success: How do you succeed internally?
How do we become internal change agents?
Dive Case Studies:
1. Bridging the speed vs rigor – data quality angle
2. How to approach Global: Best Practices and Practical Tips
3. How do you build an insights function?
4. Making Insights immediately relevant
5. DIY vs external Insights: Working in house vs external-
Why? What do you send out?
6. Budget: Getting the Most from your research budget: How do
we do the same for less?
7. Bridging the speed vs rigor – data quality angle
8. How to approach Global: Best Practices and Practical Tips
Teams & Organizational Structure: Structuring Your Teams
for Success
1. Team structures and reporting lines
a. Structure and Organization The future face of the insights team (structure,
prioritizing, DIY)
b. Matrix For Team Development
c. Where do people report to? Skill Sets needed? How do budgets work
(centralized budgets? Internal client chargebacks? Hybrid?)?
1. Storytelling
2. Data Visualization
3. Public Speaking
4. Innovation
5. Reframing the Problem
Re-framing the problem – the right questions to ask early on
- what does the business need
6. Frameworks
- Process models
- Communication Framework
- Product Development Framework
- Innovation
- Business Sizing
- MEOWS Framework
Client Vendor Relationships:
1. Navigating the Future of Client/ Vendor Relationships
2. Baseline- Finding new Suppliers
i. Vendor selection: Maintaining the ones you have, selecting new vendors
Additional Topics of Interest:
1. Creating Engagement
2. Insights from Scratch: Insights for Startups -Departments
of 1 :  What is working and what isn’t 
3. Managing & Working with Global teams
4. How do you set yourself so you can enable research
5. How are projects prioritized? Is there a system?
6. Budget: Where does funding come from?
7. When you don’t own data, how do you play in the data
economy? How do you partner w/ partners that do own the data.
8. Gamification
9. Creating a Culture of Innovation and Growth
10. Neuromarketing
11. Trends: Internet  of Things/ AI/ Culture/ Next Gen
12. Mobile Research Innovation
13. Visualization Analytics
Due to the high volume of submissions, only accepted
proposals will be notified. For consideration, please email rkunstadter@iirusa.com with the
following information by Wednesday, December 2, 2015:
‘ Proposed speaker name(s), job title(s), and company name(s)
‘ 3-4 Sentence Bio
‘ The topic your session would cover
‘ Session Title
‘ Session Description (60 words or less)- What is new and
unique? What will the audience gain from this presentation?
‘ Your complete Mailing Address, best contact number, best
  All vendors, consultants, agencies and solutions
providers that would like to get involved in TMRE Next: The New Face of CI
should contact Sponsorship Director, Jon Saxe at JSaxe@iirusa.com  or at 646.895.7467
All the best,

The TMRE Next Team

How Netflix Cracks Consumer Moments-of-Truth

Consumer Insights Director Talks
Research Innovation
By Marc Dresner, Senior Editor, IIR
It’s a testament to the fragility of success in changing
times that just 15 years ago Blockbuster Video declined an opportunity to buy
Netflix for $50 million.
(The former, of course, now rests in the business boneyard;
the latter is worth about $33 billion today.)
Without exploring Blockbuster’s missteps in detail, it’s
pretty clear that they missed a thing or two about the market and the consumer
that Netflix did not.
Indeed, the best defense against hubris in this era of flux may
be an organization’s appetite and aptitude for insights. Fortunately for
Netflix, neither seems to be a problem.
Dave Decelle
According to Consumer Insights Director Dave Decelle, Netflix
has more than tripled its consumer insights function to a team of 20 since he
was hired a few years ago.

As one of four centers of intelligence, Decelle says his
group’the only one that speaks directly with the consumer’has had to pretty
quickly carve out an identity for itself in the organization.
is very Big-Data-centric and A/B-testing-centric, so it’s been an interesting
challenge to understand where consumer insights fit into that.’
‘Netflix is very
Big-Data-centric and A/B-testing-centric, so it’s been an interesting challenge
to understand where consumer insights fit into that,’ Decelle told the Research
Not surprisingly, Decelle notes they’ve found a valuable
role in delivering the why behind all of the behavioral and other data Netflix
collects, but he adds ‘we’re really careful about not taking what consumers say at face value.’
‘We try to steer clear of just listening
superficially to what consumers tell us.’
‘We try to steer clear of just listening superficially to what consumers
tell us,’ Decelle said. ‘We try to identify and understand the true underlying
motivators that are driving that response.’
This has led Decelle and his colleagues to pursue some interesting
solutions, methodologically.
‘It’s not unusual for the consumer insights team to
be innovating on techniques.’
‘Netflix is a very innovative culture and so it’s not unusual for even
the consumer insights team to be innovating on techniques,’ Decelle noted.
In this interview for the Research Insighter
podcast series, Dave Decelle  takes us
inside consumer research at Netflix and shares some lessons learned, including:
‘ How to get at
the moment-of-truth via in-the-moment techniques
‘ Why recall is
‘ How to engage
internal clients through ‘opportunistic enthnos’ and offsite safaris’and much

Editor’s note: Dave Decelle will
be speaking at TMRE 2015The Market Research Event‘now in its 13th
year as the largest, most comprehensive research conference in the world taking
place November 2-4 in Orlando.
For information or to register, please visit TheMarketResearchEvent.com.

(Ps. SAVE $100 when you register with codeTMRE15BL!) 

Marc Dresner is IIR USA’s sr. editor and special communication project lead. He is the former executive editor of Research Business Report, a confidential newsletter for the marketing research and consumer insights industry. He may be reached at mdresner@iirusa.com. Follow him @mdrezz.