Tag Archives: innovation and market research

Clear view on MR things needed…

One of the good things when blogging for a longer period of time is the fact that you – virtually – get to know a lot of people in your area of profession.

One of the bad things is, that if you keep on blogging about specific topics for let’s say more than three years, you will see the day, that somebody you love to follow and read stops blogging. Although there are a lot of reasons for someone to stop blogging, sometimes you wish to read more from some “fading blogs”.

However, sometimes it is valuabel to re-scan even those once loved “fading blogs”, search for the good postings, re-read it and see if and what has changed over tim.

Yesterday I re-found one of my all time favourite posts ever – from May 2010.

Obviously MR hasn’t died and is still alive, but some of Mr. Heretic, the blog owner, manifesto-style hypotheses are of course still dominating today’s MR-scene.

For example this one: “You killed market research when you defended the status quo.” To be honest, this is what we do every day, don’t we? And for some reasons this is okay. But what about innovations?

I very much agree to Katie’s view on active innovation. And MR has already talked a lot about innovation in 2012..

… but nearly exclusively to its clients :-)  
However, what about innovating the own industry?

Another example: “You killed market research when you mistook information for understanding”
To be honest, I got a little bit fed up with the term “insight” over the last years. If every piece of information, offered to me as an insight really was an insight, I would be a wise man today.

Mistaking information for understanding also leads to the fact that we mis-educate our professional young talent. They often use the word insight, not knowing the difference between information and understanding.

So even MR is still alive our MR-world is still complex.
One of the consequences: We need a clear view on things and talk with each other about  the requirements.

To get a clear view on the status quo regarding innovation and insighting (beyond lots of others) make sure that you join us at the The Market Research Event 2012, hosted by IIRUSA November 12-14, 2012 in Boca Raton, FL. For more about this year’s program download the agenda.

———–
Today’s guest post is from Christian D??ssel (@olympiamilano). Christian is Senior Research Director at MM-Eye, a market research and research consulting firm in Hamburg / Germany helping clients from US and Asia to research Europe. He has worked for TNS, TBWA and other advertising, strategy and market research agencies helping clients from industries such as finance, transport and logistics, telecommunication and entertainment to understand consumers through market research and to increase implementation excellence. He will be live blogging from The Market Research Event 2012 this November 12-14 in Boca Raton, Florida. If you’d like to join him, register today and mention code TMRE12BLOG to save 15% off the standard rate!

If Innovation and ROI had a baby, it would look like…

Joshua Kantar, a researcher with Caesar’s Entertainment in Las Vegas has been quoted as saying, ‘There is a tension between Innovation and ROI that stifles creativity.’ When I first heard this I cheered inside like a middle school kid. How many times have I raved to someone about a cool idea or innovation program and had them dismiss my flash of brilliance by playing the money card? And how many times have I stamped my feet like a five year old ‘ in my mind, of course ‘ when innovation programs don’t lead to market introductions because they just don’t deliver the margins of a new flavor or new color of the same old same old. But then, I grew up.

If Steve Jobs (innovation)
 and Donald Trump (ROI)
had a baby, this is what it would
look like.  Seriously.

I started to innovate for my own company, InsightFarm, first by studying what women carry in their purses and why, so that companies could innovate new products for this home away from home carried on the shoulder of nearly every woman (www.inyourpurse.com). I was gambling with my own money. And as a sole proprietor, I was betting funds that could have gone into a college savings account for my kids, so ROI was a serious consideration. In fact, while recently scoping one of my new ideas for a syndicated study with a data collection firm, they dismissed my need to discuss what they called ‘monetization.’ They said, ‘We can discuss monetization later, let’s just figure out how to do this.’ I stopped them cold. ‘Nope,’ I said ‘we can discuss it now because without it we don’t need to know how to do this.’

Ideally, every concept or new product innovation we test would have a substantive ROI estimate before it’s tested. At P&G years ago, we wouldn’t test a concept that didn’t have a creative brief already written by the advertising agency. Each concept needed to be translatable into advertising or we didn’t test it. ROI estimation is similar. There should be baseline assumptions that tie purchase interest, frequency and other measures to margin expectations used to set pricing. Pricing should be a part of every concept testing if you’re asking purchase interest anyway, so taking a swag shouldn’t be so hard. With this in hand, the ‘tension’ between Innovation and ROI becomes a motivator for diligence in creativity. And creativity without discipline is child’s play, not innovation.

** ** **
Today’s guest post is from Kelley Styring. Styring is principal of InsightFarm Inc. a market research and consumer strategy consulting firm. She has led insights for Procter & Gamble, Pepsico, Black & Decker and NASA prior to founding her own firm in 2003. Kelley is a published author and has been featured in USA Today, ABC News, Good Morning America, Brandweek, Fortune, Quirk’s Marketing Research and The Market Research Daily Report from RFL Online.  She will be live blogging from The Market Research Event 2012 this November 12-14 in Boca Raton, Florida.  If you’d like to join her, register today and mention code TMRE12BLOG to save 15% off the standard rate!

Outside your Comfort Zone

Today’s post comes from TMRE Guest Blogger, Katie Clark. She is also known as @InsightsGal on Twitter and a client-side market researcher, project manager, and social media maven. 

I was watching a profile on Sal Khan (of Khan Academy) the other day and one of the interviewees said something that always resonates with me – the most impactful disruptors and innovators that change your industry often come from outside your industry.

Now, we can take this on a macro level and ask who and what “from outside” will be the big disruptor in the market research industry?

But we can also take this on a more micro level and note that disruptors for CPG research may come from B2B research, disruptors for quant research may come from qual research, and so on.

And the disruptor could be you!

As we’ve talked about on this blog leading up to TMRE this fall, one of the big benefits of attending events is that you get to mix and mingle with folks outside of your particular industry and that’s a good thing! What better way to get some fresh thinking and learn new ideas?

Once folks get onsite at a conference, many tend to confer with their specific industry peers and share “war stories” – that’s great but get out of your comfort zone! Don’t just confer with someone who does, pretty much, exactly what you do – chat with folks who do something vastly different…you’ll likely learn something!

That goes for sessions too. Of course you want to attend sessions that have a direct bearing on your job, but pick at least one session that may be a little “out there” for what you do – you could pick up a nugget of insight that does have relevance to your job.

If you’re looking for an interesting take on innovation and breakthrough ideas happening when you bring concepts from one field into another, check out The Medici Effect: What Elephants and Epidemics Can Teach Us About Innovation.

And for a pretty comprehensive list of excellent reads about innovation, check out this list (airplane reading for your TMRE trip?).
___________

More about Katie: Based in Portland, Maine, Katie manages the market research team at Diversified Business Communications. She has worked with companies large and small and in industries such as seafood, 3D laser imaging, software, fragrance, finance, and entertainment to help them move the business forward through actionable insights derived from market research. She is passionate about bringing the’Voice of the Customer’ inside the organization. The opinions expressed here are her own and not those of her employer.

If you’d like to join Katie at TMRE 2012 this November 12-14 in Boca Raton, Florida, register today and mention code TMRE12BLOG and save 15% off the standard rate! For more about this year’s program, download the agenda.

Research and innovation ‘ experiment and observe…

It has been a long time since Paul Lazarsfeld, founder of modern empirical social science, has shown how powerful observational methods are. His famous piece of work “Die Arbeitslosen von Marienthal” is a classic for everybody interested in sociology. Sociographic was the order in those days.

Today it looks to me as if observational methods within market research are on the rise again; especially the increasingly used online qualitative methods such as online research communities or social media monitoring.

The use of these methods is beneficial not only for generation of insights, but is becoming increasingly important for innovation management process. This is partly due to the nature of innovation on the one hand, and, on the other hand because of the – for years underestimated – power of observation.

* Foto by jcolman

From the most common method focus groups to modern behavioral economics, observations bring forth new insights, perspectives and new thinking. The usefulness of observations has nearly always been proven in our studies.

In particular for the innovation process, we have found that this method can be ideally combined with other methods. Thus, a social media monitoring approach as a precursor and input for a consumer study is ideal. Furthermore, we have seen that the combination of asynchronous methods (e.g. community research) can provide a high density of information if it is combined with synchronous elements (e.g., chat)..

For a contemporary view of innovation, it is important both to establish working practice and environments that support the idea process. And again, that is a perfect field for the use of observational method. Because consumers don’t tell what they think, don’t think what they feel, and don’t always act as they tell us how they feel and think… an old but familiar dilemma..

There will be lots of more thoughts and talks about obversation and innovation at the The Market Research Event 2011 in November in Orlando, Florida, hosted by IIR USA.

About the author: Christian D??ssel is blogging about market research in German language here and here. After having worked for TNS, TBWA and other strategy and market research agencies he now holds the position of Senior Research Director at MM-Eye in Hamburg / Germany with special responsibilities for MM-Eye’s new media and online research approaches.

A Look Back at TMRE 2009: How Consumer & Market Insights Steers Company Strategy & Innovation

The Market Research Event 2010 is taking place this November 8-10, 2010 in San Diego, California. Every Friday leading up to the event, we’ll be recapping one session from The Market Research Event 2009.

Keynote Session ‘ How Consumer & Market Insights Steers Company Strategy & Innovation

Presenter: Joan Lewis, Global Consumer & Market Knowledge Officer, The Proctor & Gamble Company

Lewis starts off her presentation by mentioning that P&G has done a lot of work on trying to get natural ingredients products on shelves. P&G has spent a lot of time to figure out what products would be beneficial for consumers and what really matters to them in different countries. Because of this P&G has created products such as the natural ingredients in dog and cat food which has saved many animals with enzyme problems just to name one.

P&G doesn’t always get it right all the time because some products fail. P&G is able to innovate through their Global Growth Strategy:

‘Touching and Improving More Consumers’ Live in More Parts of the World’More Completely’

Consumer and market knowledge helps drive company strategy, innovation, and competitive advantage. This has sparked P&G to hold over 15,000 research studies per year and spends over $350 million each year on consumer research. P&G also spends a lot of time connecting with consumers across 80 countries and has about 5 million consumers with whom they do resaerch.

Joan Lewis gives us an example of a case study with Pampers and UNICEF. Moms and dads want to help infants around the world but feel like they are helpless. Realizing this, Pampers launched the ’1 pack = 1 vaccine’ campaign where tetanus vaccines are giving to underprivileged children around the world. The purpose of the campaign is to eradicate the disease by 2015.

The 2nd case study is about Olay Pro-X. A pretty large contingent of women are interested in skincare, they are interested to spend money and time on research, and are interested in products that actually work. P&G was faced with the challenge of make it shine in order to convey their benefits of working better than $350 priced prescription medications. The packaging of Pro-X and the work done before the product hit shelves added to its credibility at $40-$50 an item. Even though there was skepticism of the product, it has been the largest launch in Olay history. Olay was able to provide consumers with a product that is valuable to them.

The 3rd case study is about Secret Clinical Strength. There was a small group of women who struggled with heavy sweating and a team listened to their problems. These women had a need that P&G could help improve on and deliver a valuable product to them. P&G had the challenge of creating a great quality product and delivering messaging to reach this target. The product has won many product awards and has received many accolades which have made it a huge success in store shelves.

Joan Lewis closes with a quote from P&G CEO, “Our Purpose inspires us. Our Values Unite us. And all our innovation capabilities and culutre focus us on making small but meaningful differences every day..for the consumers who have ALWAYS been P&G’s boss and our inspiration.”

Keynote Session ‘ How Consumer & Market Insights Steers Company Strategy & Innovation

Presenter: Joan Lewis, Global Consumer & Market Knowledge Officer, The Proctor & Gamble Company

Lewis starts off her presentation by mentioning that P&G has done a lot of work on trying to get natural ingredients products on shelves. P&G has spent a lot of time to figure out what products would be beneficial for consumers and what really matters to them in different countries. Because of this P&G has created products such as the natural ingredients in dog and cat food which has saved many animals with enzyme problems just to name one.

P&G doesn’t always get it right all the time because some products fail. P&G is able to innovate through their Global Growth Strategy:

‘Touching and Improving More Consumers’ Live in More Parts of the World’More Completely’

Consumer and market knowledge helps drive company strategy, innovation, and competitive advantage. This has sparked P&G to hold over 15,000 research studies per year and spends over $350 million each year on consumer research. P&G also spends a lot of time connecting with consumers across 80 countries and has about 5 million consumers with whom they do resaerch.

Joan Lewis gives us an example of a case study with Pampers and UNICEF. Moms and dads want to help infants around the world but feel like they are helpless. Realizing this, Pampers launched the ’1 pack = 1 vaccine’ campaign where tetanus vaccines are giving to underprivileged children around the world. The purpose of the campaign is to eradicate the disease by 2015.

The 2nd case study is about Olay Pro-X. A pretty large contingent of women are interested in skincare, they are interested to spend money and time on research, and are interested in products that actually work. P&G was faced with the challenge of make it shine in order to convey their benefits of working better than $350 priced prescription medications. The packaging of Pro-X and the work done before the product hit shelves added to its credibility at $40-$50 an item. Even though there was skepticism of the product, it has been the largest launch in Olay history. Olay was able to provide consumers with a product that is valuable to them.

The 3rd case study is about Secret Clinical Strength. There was a small group of women who struggled with heavy sweating and a team listened to their problems. These women had a need that P&G could help improve on and deliver a valuable product to them. P&G had the challenge of creating a great quality product and delivering messaging to reach this target. The product has won many product awards and has received many accolades which have made it a huge success in store shelves.

Joan Lewis closes with a quote from P&G CEO, “Our Purpose inspires us. Our Values Unite us. And all our innovation capabilities and culutre focus us on making small but meaningful differences every day..for the consumers who have ALWAYS been P&G’s boss and our inspiration.”

Kids’ food market is expected to grow

Recent research in the kids’ food industry expects it to grow from $16.4 billion in 2007 to $26.86 billion in 2011. New concerns over these obesity, hyperactivity, brain function and gut health are some of the maladies that are sources for the diet change in children.

According to the study detailed at Food Navigator, these are the some of the ways companies can innovate to capture use the growing market:

?? Fortification: With vitamins and functional ingredients ?? Taste: Which is ‘evolving and maturing’, and must be balanced with nutrition ?? Packaging: Including portion size, convenience and shape ?? Trust: Sought through organic, allergen free and additive free products