Tag Archives: Gen Y

Macro Trends You Can’t Afford to Ignore

Emma Stevens-Smith

During last week’s Marketing Analytics & Data Science conference, Emma Stevens-Smith, VP of Trends, Trendera, presented “Deciphering Generations X, Y and V.”

In addition to providing an overview of the characteristics of Gen X, Y and V, Emma shared these macro trends:

- The Rating Game: Thanks to new rating systems, the traditional brand/consumer relationship is evolving from a one-way communication to a complex set of interactions.

- Work Hard for Their Money: Consumers want to feel as if their favorite brands are working towards fulfilling their needs. They also want to know exactly how they are achieving this.

- The Surprise Drop: Consumers have become accustomed to instant gratification. Brands need to adjust their release strategy form prolonged anticipation to an unannounced release.

- On Purpose: Brands need to let consumers know what their purpose is.

- New Perspectives: Brands must ask how retail, payment and presentation of a product can be adjusted to make people excited about what they are buying.

- More Real than Virtual: Consumers are increasingly eager to incorporate Virtual Reality into their lives.

- Context is King: Consumers are looking for information that is relevant for them in a precise moment and expect brands to do this for them when and where they need it most.

Watch for additional #MADSCONF follow-up stories!

Peggy L. Bieniek, ABC is an Accredited Business Communicator specializing in corporate communication best practices. 

Connect with Peggy on LinkedInTwitterGoogle+, and on her website at www.starrybluebrilliance.com

Insights, Data, and Actions for Marketing to Generations X, Y, and V

Emma Stevens-Smith’

By understanding the next generations, you’ll be better prepared to reach your intended audience and achieve desired results.

During Day 2 of the Marketing Analytics & Data Science Conference, Emma Stevens-Smith, VP of Trends, Trendera, presented “Deciphering Generations X, Y and V.”

In this session, Emma began by providing an overview of the characteristics of Gen X, Y and V:

Gen X (1965-1979):
- Ages 36-50
- Approximately 46 million in size
- Children of Traditionalists
- Slacker stereotype
- Grew up in a troubling world
- Latchkey kids
- Had ’80s expectations, experienced ’90s realities
- Seeking work/life balance
- Nostalgic, but want the new technology
- Experiencing mid life crisis
- Savvy and skeptical
- They trust no one

Gen Y (1980-1995):
- Ages 21-35
- Approximately 72-76 million in size
- Children of Boomers
- Aka Millennials
- Entitled and empowered stereotype
- Socially networked
- Highly protected, high anxiety
- Have a good connection with Boomers
- Are influenced by Gen X
- Optimistic
- “Smarty pants”
- Always have a Plan B
- Group empowered
- They think they are special and unique

Gen V (1996-2011):
- Ages 5-20
- Approximately 65 million in size
- 25% of the population
- Children of Gen X and Gen Y
- The Homeland Generation, Gen Z or Plurals
- The true digital natives
- High anxiety
- Uber parenting
- Test subjects
- Netflix no chill
- Blurred lines of family
- Jaded and medicated
- Think different
- Social beasts
- Path rejectors
- Multiple personalities
- Commitment phobes
- Rebel yellers

Here are Emma’s recommendations for connecting with Gen X, Y, and V:
- Don’t assume they are taking the traditional path.
- Share your message on multiple screens.
- Listen to their opinions (they have many!).
- Help them learn and gain new skills.
- Encourage their entrepreneurial spirit.
- When in doubt, try to make them laugh.

Stay tuned for more #MADSCONF highlights!

Peggy L. Bieniek, ABC is an Accredited Business Communicator specializing in corporate communication best practices. 

Connect with Peggy on LinkedInTwitterGoogle+, and on her website at www.starrybluebrilliance.com

Talking with 2.5 Million Teen/20-sums: DoSomething.org COO Has Tips

Old Crank Hijacks Blog to Carp About “Kids These Days”

By Marc Dresner
As I sat down to write this post I had two depressing thoughts
and I figured I might as well drag you down with me:

1. I am
officially ‘old.’ (And if you’re 26 years of age or over, sorry, but so are you.)

2. I am
out of touch. (And if you spend a lot of time talking about ‘youth culture,’ might
be you’re out of touch, too.)

That first fun fact came courtesy of
DoSomething.org under a section on its website dubbed ‘Old People’ that
unapologetically states: ‘If you’re 26+ we
consider you officially ‘old.’ This is an org for young people.’
Aria Finger
source: Crain’s New York


(Well I didn’t want to join your stupid org anyway! Pbbt’)

The second bit I deduced’but only after chasing some
teenagers off my lawn’from a comment made by DoSomething.org’s COO, Aria
Finger, who suggested that old people who talk about young people in sweeping
generalizations probably don’t understand them as well as they think.
‘You hear people generalizing a
lot. ‘Oh, young people like to share,’ and so on,’ said Finger. ‘We need to
remember that young people are diverse.’

”Young
people’ isn’t some homogenous panacea.’
”Young people’ isn’t some homogenous panacea,’ she added.

She’s right, of course. And we’re
all guilty of it.

Marketers and researchers, in
particular, love to label and wrap blanket statements around entire
generational cohorts.
It’s how we make sense of (and
market to) the world. Show me a statistician who doesn’t dehumanize people for
a living.
Now, no one is saying that
there isn’t any truth (or utility, for that matter) to statements like ‘Young
people like to share,’ etc.
But we probably make or accept them more often than
is advisable for the sake of expedience.

Myth:
Teenagers are usually on the cutting edge of technology
We all know, for example, that Gen Z’ er, Post-Millennials?
Gen Next? ‘What are we calling these kids we’re generalizing about anyway?!?
Gen TBD?
Whatever they are, they’re ‘digital natives,’ right?
The teens are into all the cutting edge technology, right?
Wrong. Finger says that’s a big misconception.
Well, ok, but they sure seem tech-savvy. (Help me with my DVR, please!)
I mean, what about their smartphones? All the kids
have smartphones. We didn’t have smartphones when I went to high school…
And most middle-class teens in the U.S. today still
don’t, Finger noted, which is why SMS text remains such a powerful communication
tool.
And just where does she get her information, you ask?
Why from DoSomething.org’s 2.5 million members ages
25 and under, of course.

 ‘We can send a text to 1.6 million young
people and get up to 70,000 responses in minutes.’
‘We can send a text to 1.6 million young people and
get up to 70,000 responses in a matter of minutes,’ Finger told The Research Insighter.
(For
any out-of-touch oldies, DoSomething is a pretty-big-deal-not-for-profit dedicated
to ‘making the world suck less’ by connecting teens and early 20-somethings to
social causes that matter to them.)
Finger
is also president of TMI, DoSomething’s agency subsidiary specializing in
research and consulting services around youth, technology and social change.
As a
result, Finger knows a thing or two about the kids and how to communicate with
them.
And in this podcast with The Research Insighter
interview series, Finger shares some tips for talking with young people, including:

‘ Why ‘if you build it they will come’ isn’t a great
mobile strategy

‘ How to keep an authentic two-way text dialogue
going with thousands of young people

‘ Why brands shouldn’t necessarily just take the
kids’ word for it when it comes to preferences, and more’
Editor’s
note:
Aria Finger will present ‘Using Mobile and Data Insights to Activate
Youth’ at The Future of Consumer Intelligence Conference taking place May 19th
through the 21st in Universal City, California.


SAVE 15% to attend The Future of Consumer Intelligence when you use code FOCI14BLOG today! 

For
more information or to register, please visit www.futureofconsumerintel.com


Old Crank

ABOUT THE AUTHOR / INTERVIEWER 
Marc Dresner is IIR USA’s sr. editor and special communication project lead. He is the former executive editor of Research Business Report, a confidential newsletter for the marketing research and consumer insights industry. He may be reached at mdresner@iirusa.com. Follow him @mdrezz.

TMRE Day 3: Youth, Reimagining

The third and final day of The Market Research Event might have been my favorite of all. Folks dragged in for morning sessions, but the prior two days had brains pliable and social creativity was juiced.

A couple of thoughts that really stood out for me for the day:

  • -”We benchmark ourselves too much to our competitors.” Jeremy Gutsche of Trendhunter kept us engaged and, hopefully, eager to go back and challenge the drivers behind the work we’re all doing. It’s a dangerous endeavor to simply confirm biases with research. Involving the fringe and trends as a part of every project should be standard rather than a rarity.
  • -Christine Stasiw-Lazarchuk of Ford shared that, following Ford’s recasting of itself, the marketing had to reduce its headcount by 70% while budget was reduced 40%. Instead of “doing more with less,” Her response? “Treat your suppliers as partners…have them feel the success. You won’t be sorry.” Ford elected to build unique relationships with their suppliers; letting them into the room and to be a part of the conversation rather than tossing insights over the fence and wishing for the best. Those are the kinds of partnerships in which clients and vendors both win and create incremental value for brands – let’s all get there.
  • -The word cloud for day three shows us a couple of other key concepts: (a) Mobile (b) Gen Y. These concepts share young consumers and leading insights in common. You could say that youth and new-to-world methodologies were the real rock stars of The Market Research Event. Clients consistently share with us that youth are not only a significant target for today, but also harbingers of the future – a living future trend, so to speak. I challenge all of you to consider how a youth lens can reveal more about our efforts – whether we’re in advanced planning in auto and consumer tech or media where young peoples’ adoption rates can signal success or failure.

Considering all three days collectively I’m equal parts exhausted & thrilled as I know many of you are! And how do we know it was great? Our friends on Twitter had nothing else to say…

@johnmwilliamson: Great time at #TMRE in Orlando

@akpradeep: Terrific time at #TMRE in Orlando. Thanks to @IIRUSA for bringing together such a stellar group of marketing minds.

@ramiuscorp: Back from #TMRE. Had a gr8 time & met a lot of ppl.

@InsightsGal: Just back from #tmre and my just-getting-caffeinated mind is full of great learnings, new contacts, and fresh insights!

@statmaven: #TMRE…was a great conference. Great speakers, high octane contacts, Highly recommended, #mrx, #ngmr

@bakken17: #TMRE was awesome! Thanks for a great time full of learning.

It’s safe to say that TMRE was valuable again this year. The weight, now, is on all of us to DO something with these great insights. Perhaps in 2012 will be YOUR year to present on your success applying your 2011 TMRE learnings?

All the best to a great year ahead for each and every one of you.

Engaging with Gen Y Through Social Networks

Dan Schawbel of Mashable recently listed the top 10 social networks for Generation Y in this post here, but Tim Wright of the Examiner picks out the top 5 from Dan’s list that managers should take a look at in order to know as much about Gen Y as they can. This includes their values, their interests, their styles, their clothes, and the way they think. Here are some sites that the Tim recommends taking a look at in this post. Enjoy!

http://brazencareerist.com
http://20somethings.ning.com
http://My.BarackObama.com
http://myYearbook.com
http://coolpeoplecare.org

Being green important to customers

At the B2B Blog, they reveal the latest studies about how consumers are looking at the new green revolution. Of the customers surveyed, three in four have defined themselves as green, and 57% of those have made a green purchase within the past six months. The younger generation, those age 18 – 34, 24% believe that it’s trendy to be green. What is your company doing to capture this new trend?

Interesting Learnings on “The Experience Generation”

Hello all, it’s been several weeks since I was on hand at TMRE 2008 and had a chance to share with you all my perspectives from the conference. There was so much to participate in, there were still some thoughts I had that I now finally have the chance to share with you all. I had the pleasure of meeting both Tamara Sachs, CEO and Robert Miner, President of SachsInsights at The Market Research Event in October. We posted some details from this presentation before. Their compelling qualitative research work is supplemented with high quality “video storytelling”, and it’s fascinating!

I was fortunate to sit in. So here is a small clip of the workshop Robert Miner gave on “MilleniAdults–the experience generation.”

Mr. Miner mentioned several key points that define this segment:

1) Belief in a Kaleidoscope of Options

2) Definition of Success Varies Across the Segment (financially secure, life experiences, making a difference)

3) Entry Level Debt

4) Online Social Networking

For more video footage of the ethnographic study conducted by SachsInsights, you can visit their website.

Good stuff!!

Reaching Gen Y

At Customer Experience Matters, they recently discussed how to get Gen Y’s attention online. They focus the importance of immediacy, and how online websites need to reflect the the most current information available to keep their attention.

They provided three strategies:

  1. Refresh and update content constantly. Changing content frequently and updating feature page elements on a regular basis give users a reason to return over time.
  2. Expose value immediately. Delivering clear calls to action and interactive cues help draw young visitors into experiences right away.
  3. Provide frequent feedback. Presenting notifications, rewards, and other feedback to users throughout an experience keeps them alert and engaged.

What other strategies would you suggest?