Tag Archives: Future of Consumer Intelligence

Creating, Curating and Socializing Insights in a Time Compressed World

Who knew that the first phone was born by AT&T in 1876, 138 years ago? And that the iPhone is already 7 years old?

 

Speed and faster time to insights was aptly showcased  with the telecom industry where competition is high and brand loyalty is pervasively low. Your phone is, after all, the remote control of your life. Well expressed by AT&T and SKIM.

The key message of nobody has time resonates with a plethora of industries in a hyper competitive world, which is fast changing, mandating extremely targeted insights and very short timelines.

 

Amongst the key takeaways that will shortly be updated on the site, some of the more actionable ones included:

  • Having a seamless team that is cross functional with key stakeholders. Align, align and align.
  • Know what your stakeholders DON’T want, its a twist on knowing what they want.
  • Keep it brief and actionable (12 slides!)
  • Think lean: keep things seamless, transparent.
Sourabh Sharma,
Communication & Social Media Research Expert at SKIM, an international
consultancy and marketing research agency, has a background in engineering,
marketing and finance from the University of Pennsylvania, and the Wharton
School and Rotterdam School of Management. Having worked in marketing and
product development at L’Oreal, followed by a stint in management consulting,
he now passionately enjoys the world of social media, and can be found on every
platform with his alias sssourabh. He is a food critic and a fashion writer,
and documents these alongside strategy on his blog called
3FS. He may be reached at s.sharma@skimgroup.com.
Follow him on
@sssourabh.

Tweet & Win a Free Pass to The Future of Consumer Intelligence 2014

Fans and followers of the The Future of Consumer Intelligence
are invited to enter the Tweet & Win
Contest 
by following @TMRE and/or visiting and tweeting
with the hashtag #FOCIWIN to win one of three prizes:
  1. A complimentary pass to attend The Future of Consumer
    Intelligence 2014
  2. A signed copy of ‘Contagious: Why Things Catch On’ by Jonah Berger
  3. A signed copy of ‘Hacking H(app)iness by John C. Havens

You may tweet anything you’d like regarding The Future of
Consumer Intelligence but be sure to include the hashtag #FOCIWIN to be
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For more information, the rules, and a set of tweets to
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The Future of Consumer Intelligence 2014 explores the
emerging role of decision science and the convergence of knowledge points -
insights, foresights, social science, marketing science and intelligence with
technology as a central driving force and profound connector. The Future of
Consumer Intelligence, 
delivering the quality you’ve come to come to expect,
from the producers of The Market Research Event.

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Four Consumer Segments of the Modern Shopping World

Shopping seasons often fall around holiday seasons, and absorb anywhere from weeks to months of our time as shoppers and consumers, and even more so if for marketers. The season evokes the anxiety, well pondered over in days when brands battled for loyal consumers.

On drawing comparisons between the online and offline world, alongside the regularity of last minute versus planned shoppers, a two by two matrix on uncovering four shopping personalities can be deduced. Let’s call it The Timed Shopping Framework, since it can apply to any phase of life when we have to shop with a deadline.

The full length version of this post can be read on: Where does Online Shopping leave Glamorous Window Displays?

Holiday Shopping Framework @sssourabh
Bandwidth Basher
Purchasing Power: High. It’s unlikely that these
shoppers will be looking for deals, but are more in a frantic rush to
buy something while multitasking a busy corporate or bustling
alternative life; thus the restraint from going in stores.
Retailer Benefit: Shipping fees. Consumers in this
segment may be blind to free shipping coupons in all the haste, so
retailers can gobble up any margins on those exorbitant overnight fees.

Strategic Sprawler
Purchasing Power: Moderate. These shoppers will likely have scouted the deals, almost as early as Black Friday and Thanksgiving.
Being deal hunters, it’s not to say they are budget battlers: rather
the contrary, they are likely to spend in volume. Call them indecisive,
or on the other spectrum, simply smart with a cool variety of friends.
Retailer Benefit: Volume purchase and loyalty. It’s
likely that these shoppers will seek deals with enough prowess to use
coupon codes or minimum purchase requirements to benefit retailers,
either with volume or future loyalty.
  
Methodical Maneuverer
Purchasing Power: Moderate. These are traditional
shoppers that would rather drive to the stores come fall, and load up
their trunks and rear seats with less shopping on a periodic basis. And
they never forget the wrapping, bows, cards and frills. These shoppers
either have a sense of detail, or are simply preventing an anxiety attack, as per a former framework.
Retailer Benefit: Traditional store sales, which as we
all know, may not be real value sales, but well marketed ones.
Nonetheless, courtesy of methodical research, retailers should not
expect these consumers to be strong spenders.

Splurging Sprinter
Purchasing Power: High. These shoppers have simply had
no time in bustling lives, and tend to leave things to the last minute.
With about half of their preferred selections disappearing off shelves,
they are likely to be struck by anxiety and spend more than they need.
Sans details, they may skip the frills and even ask for gift wrapped
gifts altogether! Just beware that these folks may be struck by stress
more often than not; even in public.
Retailer Benefit: Revenues from last minute shopping.
Retailers can expect high spending from these consumers, with a slight
dose of stress depending on the level of shopper persistence. It will be
easy to entice them with leftover, often non-sale items, or with
stocking stuffers.

Sourabh Sharma,
Communication & Social Media Research Expert at SKIM, an international
consultancy and marketing research agency, has a background in engineering,
marketing and finance from the University of Pennsylvania, and the Wharton
School and Rotterdam School of Management. Having worked in marketing and
product development at L’Oreal, followed by a stint in management consulting,
he now passionately enjoys the world of social media, and can be found on every
platform with his alias sssourabh. He is a food critic and a fashion writer,
and documents these alongside strategy on his blog called
3FS. He may be reached at s.sharma@skimgroup.com.
Follow him on
@sssourabh.

Crowdsourcing and Social Media Marketing: Is there more than selfie or hashtag creativity?

Evolving is the bettering or worsening of a sturdy phenomenon. Change is
a more radical spin on the very same. But when it comes to social media
habits, it is tricky to discern what is evolutionary and what is truly
changing. Of 6 social media habits discussed previous on my blog, crowdsourcing comes up as relevant for marketing research. And why no, it is essentially based on the same principles of asking, listening, gathering. However, is there more to social media marketing than the surge of selfie and hashtag creativity? 

Crowdsourcing

Now that brands are all over Instagram and HBO is on Snapchat,
consumers can expect to engage more with their brands on social than
ever before. Tag them for coupons, like them for access, Instagram them
for prizes or sneak previews, and eventually, engage with them like
friends so as to passively provide them with growth strategies that come
directly from the consumer’s mouth. Take the affair of social media with fashion week as a case in point. Truly, crowdsourcing at its best.

Selfie Creativity

The coining of Selfie Olympics on Twitter
has shown that the selfie phenomenon will not langusih, especially
since the iPhone 5S has an exemplary front facing camera, which, let’s
get real, was not only for facetime or videochat. With cold selfies trending during the Polar Vortex,
and people risking frostbite for the perfect selfie, the creativity
will continue to rise’ through reflections, acrobatic bathroom antics,
and even a foray into the lives of those otherwise respected.

Hashtag Creativity

Events and conferences marvel at the connectivity and knowledge
sharing prowess of hashtags and networking. But besides events, tv
shows, and organizational hashtags, these have shown to be useful in
drawing people together for absurd phenomenons too. Examples include a
user created trend called #Walmartfights to share nationwide happenings on the anxious Black Friday. The most tragic of interpretations was developing nations’ kids reading out quotes tagged with the ironic phrase #firstworldproblems, probably the most tear jerking iconic display of hashtag displacement.





On the quest for content, brands and marketers will need to try and swim through the modern equivalent of fan mail (which is useful, gratifying and priceless, nonetheless!) to gather relevant insight.

Sourabh Sharma,
Communication & Social Media Research Expert at SKIM, an international
consultancy and marketing research agency, has a background in engineering,
marketing and finance from the University of Pennsylvania, and the Wharton
School and Rotterdam School of Management. Having worked in marketing and
product development at L’Oreal, followed by a stint in management consulting,
he now passionately enjoys the world of social media, and can be found on every
platform with his alias sssourabh. He is a food critic and a fashion writer,
and documents these alongside strategy on his blog called
3FS. He may be reached at s.sharma@skimgroup.com.
Follow him on
@sssourabh.
Sourabh Sharma,
Communication & Social Media Research Expert at SKIM, an international
consultancy and marketing research agency, has a background in engineering,
marketing and finance from the University of Pennsylvania, and the Wharton
School and Rotterdam School of Management. Having worked in marketing and
product development at L’Oreal, followed by a stint in management consulting,
he now passionately enjoys the world of social media, and can be found on every
platform with his alias sssourabh. He is a food critic and a fashion writer,
and documents these alongside strategy on his blog called
3FS. He may be reached at s.sharma@skimgroup.com.
Follow him on
@sssourabh.
Sourabh Sharma,
Communication & Social Media Research Expert at SKIM, an international
consultancy and marketing research agency, has a background in engineering,
marketing and finance from the University of Pennsylvania, and the Wharton
School and Rotterdam School of Management. Having worked in marketing and
product development at L’Oreal, followed by a stint in management consulting,
he now passionately enjoys the world of social media, and can be found on every
platform with his alias sssourabh. He is a food critic and a fashion writer,
and documents these alongside strategy on his blog called
3FS. He may be reached at s.sharma@skimgroup.com.
Follow him on
@sssourabh. – See more at: http://themarketresearcheventblog.iirusa.com/2013_03_01_archive.html#sthash.DwQUug1X.dpuf
Sourabh Sharma,
Communication & Social Media Research Expert at SKIM, an international
consultancy and marketing research agency, has a background in engineering,
marketing and finance from the University of Pennsylvania, and the Wharton
School and Rotterdam School of Management. Having worked in marketing and
product development at L’Oreal, followed by a stint in management consulting,
he now passionately enjoys the world of social media, and can be found on every
platform with his alias sssourabh. He is a food critic and a fashion writer,
and documents these alongside strategy on his blog called
3FS. He may be reached at s.sharma@skimgroup.com.
Follow him on
@sssourabh. – See more at: http://themarketresearcheventblog.iirusa.com/2013_03_01_archive.html#sthash.DwQUug1X.dpuf

- See more at: http://themarketresearcheventblog.iirusa.com/#sthash.uwXVqr8E.dpuf

Sourabh Sharma,
Communication & Social Media Research Expert at SKIM, an international
consultancy and marketing research agency, has a background in engineering,
marketing and finance from the University of Pennsylvania, and the Wharton
School and Rotterdam School of Management. Having worked in marketing and
product development at L’Oreal, followed by a stint in management consulting,
he now passionately enjoys the world of social media, and can be found on every
platform with his alias sssourabh. He is a food critic and a fashion writer,
and documents these alongside strategy on his blog called
3FS. He may be reached at s.sharma@skimgroup.com.
Follow him on
@sssourabh.
Sourabh Sharma,
Communication & Social Media Research Expert at SKIM, an international
consultancy and marketing research agency, has a background in engineering,
marketing and finance from the University of Pennsylvania, and the Wharton
School and Rotterdam School of Management. Having worked in marketing and
product development at L’Oreal, followed by a stint in management consulting,
he now passionately enjoys the world of social media, and can be found on every
platform with his alias sssourabh. He is a food critic and a fashion writer,
and documents these alongside strategy on his blog called
3FS. He may be reached at s.sharma@skimgroup.com.
Follow him on
@sssourabh. – See more at: http://themarketresearcheventblog.iirusa.com/2013_03_01_archive.html#sthash.DwQUug1X.dpuf
Sourabh Sharma,
Communication & Social Media Research Expert at SKIM, an international
consultancy and marketing research agency, has a background in engineering,
marketing and finance from the University of Pennsylvania, and the Wharton
School and Rotterdam School of Management. Having worked in marketing and
product development at L’Oreal, followed by a stint in management consulting,
he now passionately enjoys the world of social media, and can be found on every
platform with his alias sssourabh. He is a food critic and a fashion writer,
and documents these alongside strategy on his blog called
3FS. He may be reached at s.sharma@skimgroup.com.
Follow him on
@sssourabh. – See more at: http://themarketresearcheventblog.iirusa.com/2013_03_01_archive.html#sthash.DwQUug1X.dpuf

- See more at: http://themarketresearcheventblog.iirusa.com/#sthash.uwXVqr8E.dpuf

What’s the bigger social media threat: verification or platform overload?

Evolving is the bettering or worsening of a sturdy phenomenon. Change is
a more radical spin on the very same. But when it comes to social media
habits, it is tricky to discern what is evolutionary and what is truly
changing. Two elements that pose a risk to using social media for marketing are verification, and a simple overwhelm, particularly of visual platforms. Two trends highlighted further in Social Media Habits of 2014.

Ever had a tweet favorite or retweeted almost simultaneously after
posting? Or are you guilty of scrolling and liking or disliking? While
it may be the signs of an obsessive compulsive behavior, it becomes even
more risky in the world of big data. When emergencies happen, or
misquotes are leaked, or media puts forth information that is not
verified, the habit can become a risky one. Things like events in Boston give rise to the speed vs accuracy paradox, as do weather related calamities
like the Polar Vortex or Sandy. The key is to always ensure to verify
before sharing, before misinformation leads to virality. But is this
even possible in a me-first world?
social media @sssourabh

Similarly, ever noticed how Facebook, Instagram, Pinterest, Tumblr or Snapchat
are all driven by a vicarious sharing of images (and off late, videos)?
Sometimes even the same ones’ with some apps making it easy to cross
share. Besides a sense of overwhelm, there is also a notion of d??j?? vu.
Social media is meant to be current, but is getting muddled with the
user equivalent of recycling and content marketing. And some of these
platforms are aping one another, like direct messaging on Instagram as a war to snapchat.
Video was born to Vine, and is now popular with Instagram and
Flipagram, alike. One of these photo platforms will surely tumble under
the mounting pressure to distinguish and differentiate. Is another
MySpace coming our way? Until then, anticipate more scrolling and
observing, until there is simply less time spent on certain platforms
before the final crash.

Sourabh Sharma,
Communication & Social Media Research Expert at SKIM, an international
consultancy and marketing research agency, has a background in engineering,
marketing and finance from the University of Pennsylvania, and the Wharton
School and Rotterdam School of Management. Having worked in marketing and
product development at L’Oreal, followed by a stint in management consulting,
he now passionately enjoys the world of social media, and can be found on every
platform with his alias sssourabh. He is a food critic and a fashion writer,
and documents these alongside strategy on his blog called
3FS. He may be reached at s.sharma@skimgroup.com.
Follow him on
@sssourabh.

Real Time Marketing or Video Marketing?

As we’ve witnessed already, evolution is distinct from change. Especially in the context of the social media world.

The landscape of digital marketing and social media evolves so
rapidly that it becomes tricky for marketers to plan strategies ahead of
time. Contrary to the industrial age of budgeting and planning, the
modern age requires adaptability, spontaneity and competitive
understanding. Amidst other digital trends that are covered in 5 Trends in Digital Marketing, two that stand out are the battle between Real Time and Video Marketing.



Real Time Marketing
Is almost as if something is memory, vintage, expired or extinct on its maiden voyage. As the antithesis to traditional advertising
which worked on repeat value, real time marketing is more than just the
hype of being current, but is more agile, in the moment. As social
media experts have it, its not a project but a process, and is thus
fluid, ongoing, instead of a one shot advertising campaign. For
marketers, this obviously means that the content marketed as real-time
needs to be brand relevant and not just a hype driver.

Video Marketing

Instagram
introduced videos as competition to Vine, despite both evolving into
separate uses of video: one for viral marketing and the other for
personal sharing. Even Snapchat enabled video, as Facebook improved its
platforms. Video marketing is likely to wrinkle out any glitches it may
have, since while mobile and tablet markets embrace video happily, apps
have improved video platforms as an enabler. Owing to a visual medium
that is a step further in than still images, video will become the
biggest trend of the year, owing to its visual prowess. And watch for a
photo video fusion with the likes of Flipagram catching on.

So what is more catchy in today’s world – the real time nature of marketing, or the format of video that has blended so easily in the consumer world?

Either way, as marketers, the key pieces of interrelated advice are as follows: beware and be aware’ both of evolution and change.

Sourabh Sharma,
Communication & Social Media Research Expert at SKIM, an international
consultancy and marketing research agency, has a background in engineering,
marketing and finance from the University of Pennsylvania, and the Wharton
School and Rotterdam School of Management. Having worked in marketing and
product development at L’Oreal, followed by a stint in management consulting,
he now passionately enjoys the world of social media, and can be found on every
platform with his alias sssourabh. He is a food critic and a fashion writer,
and documents these alongside strategy on his blog called
3FS. He may be reached at s.sharma@skimgroup.com.
Follow him on
@sssourabh.
Sourabh Sharma,
Communication & Social Media Research Expert at SKIM, an international
consultancy and marketing research agency, has a background in engineering,
marketing and finance from the University of Pennsylvania, and the Wharton
School and Rotterdam School of Management. Having worked in marketing and
product development at L’Oreal, followed by a stint in management consulting,
he now passionately enjoys the world of social media, and can be found on every
platform with his alias sssourabh. He is a food critic and a fashion writer,
and documents these alongside strategy on his blog called
3FS. He may be reached at s.sharma@skimgroup.com.
Follow him on
@sssourabh. – See more at: http://themarketresearcheventblog.iirusa.com/2013_03_01_archive.html#sthash.DwQUug1X.dpuf
Sourabh Sharma,
Communication & Social Media Research Expert at SKIM, an international
consultancy and marketing research agency, has a background in engineering,
marketing and finance from the University of Pennsylvania, and the Wharton
School and Rotterdam School of Management. Having worked in marketing and
product development at L’Oreal, followed by a stint in management consulting,
he now passionately enjoys the world of social media, and can be found on every
platform with his alias sssourabh. He is a food critic and a fashion writer,
and documents these alongside strategy on his blog called
3FS. He may be reached at s.sharma@skimgroup.com.
Follow him on
@sssourabh. – See more at: http://themarketresearcheventblog.iirusa.com/2013_03_01_archive.html#sthash.DwQUug1X.dpuf

Why I’m Excited to Attend the Future of Consumer Intelligence 2014

“Must-See” Sessions at #FOCI14

By Isaiah Adams, Optimization Group

Coming this May I’ll be jumping on a plane to Los Angeles to attend the Future of Consumer Intelligence conference. As I read over the conference schedule a few of the sessions jump out at me as ‘must-see’ sessions. Below is a list of the sessions I’m most excited about. I’d love to hear what sessions you plan to attend in the comments section below. 

Progress in the Adoption of Innovations for Consumer Intelligence

William MacElroy, Chairman, SOCRATIC TECHNOLOGIES INC.

This session is basically showing the degree to which institutional barriers exist to the adoption of new and innovative market research techniques. I’m looking forward to this session because I’ve experienced these barriers first-hand and would like to see what barriers others have encountered. I remember back when I was pitching Crowdsourcing/Co-creation to P&G (back when Crowdcourcing/Co-creation was relatively new) and it was a difficult process. Although P&G was one of the first ‘big players’ to invest significantly in Crowdsourcing/Co-creation, getting them to open their mind up to a new research technique was like pulling teeth. If you’ve spent any time around P&G headquarters in Ohio, you understand that ‘culture’ and institutional processes reign supreme.

Designing Habit-Forming Technology

Nir Eyal, Habit Design Researcher, NIRANDFAR.COM

This kick-off keynote grabbed my attention right away when I heard Eyal will be talking about something I deal with on a daily basis. My role at Optimization Group requires me to be active in all the latest technology and social networks. Combine that with the other A.D.D habits of millennials and you have someone who can’t put his phone down. Over time I’ve realized that a lot of my fidgeting with my phone and checking email can be attributed to habits I’ve formed with technology. Whenever I purposely take a hiatus from these habits for a short period of time (maybe 24hrs) I find myself having withdrawals. Hopefully Eyal’s keynote presentation can shed light into how these habit-forming technologies are formed’.so hopefully I can find a way to ‘control’ my addiction.

REVOLT’s Millennial Manifesto: Identifying the #NewRules for a #NoRules Generation

Jake Katz, VP, Audience Insights & Strategy, REVOLT

Again, as a millennial myself, any study that uncovers insight into my generation is interesting. In this session Katz will share research he’s done on how Market Research is adapting to the needs of millennials. It will be interesting to see how research is adapting to the entertainment-driven millennial culture (if it’s boring we don’t waste our time with it) and how research is adapting to the way millennials interact with each other. 

The Web Within Us: When Minds & Machines Become One

Ray Kurzweil, Author, Inventor, Futurist, Director of Engineering, GOOGLE

I can’t decide if I’m excited or frightened to attend this keynote presentation. Kurzwell plans to present his vision on how humans and machines will merge within the next three to four decades. Is it just me or is this idea frightening? I know it’s a popular fantasy. All you have to do is look at the success of prime-time television shows Intelligence and Almost Human.

These are the sessions I’m most excited about. Please share what sessions intrigue you the most below in the comments section.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Isaiah Adams is the Manager of Social Media Development at Optimization Group, a marketing research and analytics firm that uses cutting edge technology to help clients make fact-based decisions. Optimization Group has a dedicated place on its site where agencies can learn how to use research to help their clients succeed called the Advertising Agency Hub.
Follow Optimization Group on Twitter @optimizationgrp

Driving Innovation through Consumer Insights

At The Future of Consumer Intelligence
2013, IIR’s Marc Dresner sat down with Katy Mogal, Innovation Lead of Human-Centered
Innovation at Logitech to discuss consumer insights as an agent for cultural innovation
change.
In a lot of tech companies there has traditionally been an
engineering-driven culture because if you could get to market faster with a technological
innovation, then that is how you could win. Today, technology innovation is
almost a commodity because as soon as you put something into the marketplace,
somebody else can replicate it very quickly or improve it.
‘Technology innovation by itself isn’t giving us the competitive
advantage we need to grow,’ she explained. ‘I think the way we are really going
to win is by understanding the consumer need and marrying that to the
technological innovation.
This requires Logitech to reorient the entire culture around
the need of the consumer, which is the company’s biggest task today. According
to Mogal, accomplishing this task is about understanding organizational culture
and how organizations learn.
Mogal has been working on finding out the learning styles of
Logitech – how to people take in information, what gives information credibility,
what captures people’s attention. ‘ and developing the company’s deliverables
around those findings.  In addition,
Mogal and her team are trying to bring people in earlier in the process by
exposing them to raw data and let more people observe in real time.

Check out the full
interview below
:

This year, The Future of
Consumer Intelligence 2014 
explores the emerging role of decision
science and the convergence of knowledge points – insights, foresights, social
science, marketing science and intelligence with technology as a central
driving force and profound connector.
Right now, it’s about connecting ideas to data to culture to
the future of your business and this, is the real data revolution. This year
represents the year of the multi-dimensional marketplace, and just as the
market researcher’s role evolves, so does our third annual event. FOCI is a
gathering of the “consumer culture” collective exploring common
ground across roles and industries for translating behavioral information into
business opportunity.  We hope to see you there!
Join us at FOCI 2014
in May. To register, click here:  http://bit.ly/LI0Dvb

About the Author:
Amanda Ciccatelli, Social Media Strategist of the Marketing Division at IIR USA, has a background in digital and
print journalism, covering a variety of topics in business strategy, marketing,
and technology. Amanda is the Editor at Large for several of IIR’s blogs
including Next Big DesignCustomers 1st, and ProjectWorld and World Congress for Business
Analysts
. She previously worked at Technology Marketing Corporation as a
Web Editor where she covered breaking news and feature stories in the
technology industry. She can be reached at aciccatelli@iirusa.com. Follow
her at @AmandaCicc.   

FOCI Speaker Spotlight: John Havens

We recently sat down with Future
of Consumer Intelligence 2014
keynote speaker John Havens, who is also founder
of The H(app)athon Project, Author of “HACKING H(APP)INESS- Why Your Personal Data Counts and How Tracking
it Can Change the World.” Havens discussed with us the importance of the humanization of data, the
impact of technology on market research, 
the new buzzword ‘data science,’ among much more.
Havens has recognized and experienced, first hand, the
evolutionary changes happening in the market industry as of late. We are
fortunate to have him share this critical insight with our FOCI community. This year, FOCI explores the emerging role of decision
science and the convergence of knowledge points – insights, foresights, social
science, marketing science and intelligence with technology as a central driving
force and profound connector.
We are barraged by information – and within this sea of data
we must remember to think of the problem we are trying to solve and how we can
we use this convergence of information to better understand people.  Translating the new “understanding”
into future opportunities means that the role of a researcher is changing. FOCI
accelerates disruptive innovators in the research space and pushes people to
take risks, to think outside of traditional research methods and insights
gathering and explore new and alternative tools and technologies. FOCI will
bridge the gap between what people say they are going to do and what they
actually do.
Here is what Havens had to say:
IIR: A big theme
of this year’s conference is ‘humanization of data.’ Why do you think
understanding PEOPLE (not consumers) presents an opportunity for strategic
action?
Havens: Defining
someone as a “consumer” already defines them by a behavior
(consuming) versus measuring them in the larger context of wellbeing or other
metrics.  People do a lot in their lives outside of purchasing/consuming
so taking these things into account (health, happiness, career) provides a lot
of opportunity for strategic action.
IIR: How is
technology not only changing how we do things, but also how we understand the
world, business, and people?
Havens: Technology
can be a lens to see people in a new light.  Literally, this can happen
with something like Google Glass or similar augmented reality
technologies.  While there are huge opportunities for positive change with
these technologies and how they’ll help improve our lives, it’s also critically
important at this juncture in time to analyze the ethical implications of these
types of tools today.  The lenses or filters we choose to view the world
through can narrow our vision as much as expand it.  
IIR: How has
consumer intelligence strategy and action planning helped drive your business?
Havens: In my
current work, I’m focused on measuring individual and collective
wellbeing.  We’re not focusing specifically on consumers.  However,
gaining analytical insights based on subjective wellbeing (how people rate
their wellbeing/happiness) and other similar data drives the foundation of what
we do.
IIR: How has the
role of ‘the researcher’ changed?

Havens: In
regards to analytics, research can now be done with large data sets of existing
information versus creating customized surveys and individual research. 
So in many ways, in those types of situations, “researchers” are
becoming “analysts.”
IIR: Describe a
situation where you’ve taken a risk or thought outside the box of tradition
market research methods. How did that benefit your business?
Havens: We’re
still young in our work/research, but our use of passive sensors in mobile
phones is what we hope will distinguish our work in the wellbeing arena. This
type of work has not been done that much yet to the best of our knowledge.
IIR: Where do you
see the emerging space of marketing science and role of data scientists in the
next five years?
Havens: I think
IT and marketing departments will essentially become as one pretty soon. 
And they should.  There’s currently a huge disconnect between CMO’s and
CIO’s and how those two departments can effectively communicate and work
together.
IIR: How has the
increasingly connected consumer affected market research?
Havens: How have
they not?  There’s more data than ever before contributed not just
directly by consumers.
Want to hear more
from John in person? Join him at Future of Consumer
Intelligence 2014
in Los Angeles, CA in May. To learn more about the event
and register, click here:
http://bit.ly/1hNKD5o
John Havens 

About the Author:
Amanda Ciccatelli, Social Media Strategist of the Marketing Division at IIR USA, has a background in digital and
print journalism, covering a variety of topics in business strategy, marketing,
and technology. Amanda is the Editor at Large for several of IIR’s blogs
including Next Big DesignCustomers 1st, and ProjectWorld and World Congress for Business
Analysts
, and a regular contributor to Front End of Innovation and The Market Research Event,.
She previously worked at Technology Marketing Corporation as a Web Editor where
she covered breaking news and feature stories in the technology industry. She
can be reached at aciccatelli@iirusa.com. Follow her at @AmandaCicc.

Keith Ferrazzi Talks Customer Experience Leadership in the Digital Age

We recently sat down with Total Customer Experience Leaderships Summit’s keynote
speaker Keith Ferrazzi, who is also CEO of Ferrazzi Greenlight and Author of
Never Eat Alone. Ferrazzi discussed how customer experienced has evolved in the
digital age and the importance of customer experience leadership.
This year, TCEL will explore the new realities of building
brands and relationships in today’s socially driven and data abundant world.
The event will shine an important lens on the power of insights and the
critical need for marketers to focus on factoring emotion into the bigger
equation to get a return on customer relationships. Download the brochure for
the full agenda:  http://bit.ly/1f1N97M
Here is what Ferrazzi had to say:
IIR: Why are
empathy and emotion so important in when it comes
to customer experience?
Ferrazzi: Technology’s
pretty much leveled the field with regard to quality, making customers more
likely to develop relationships with the companies they choose to work with.
That’s put the customer in the position of looking for a more personal
experience. They want to work with people they trust. Empathy, vulnerability,
emotion are ways to develop that trust. 
IIR: What
are the key traits of a great customer experience leader?
Ferrazzi:  Obviously,
accountability is critical. You’re responsible for your customer’s experience,
good or bad. But trust, creativity and adaptability are also pretty high. You
have to trust your team to constantly look for new ways to improve the customer
experience. You need the creativity to see the bigger, longer picture. And you
need to be lean enough to change courses when necessary.
IIR: If your
customers have a bad customer experience, how do you reconnect with
them moving forward?
Ferrazzi: Before
anything else, admit your mistake, if it was your mistake, and apologize
directly. So many difficult situations can be neutralized with two simple, but
sincere, words: “I’m sorry.” Customers are angry after a bad
experience because they feel like they were treated poorly. By apologizing,
you’ve already changed the dynamic and make resolving the situation more
collaborative. From there you can turn a bad customer experience into a loyal
customer just by being open to their feelings.
IIR: How has
the digital revolution changed the overall customer experience?
Ferrazzi: It’s
certainly had an equalizing effect. Neither customer nor company is limited by
the old, pre-digital marketplace. Small start-ups can compete against big
brands by serving a specific niche and can reach customers all over the world,
just by being where their customers are online. And with so much market
segmentation targeting your specific customers is more cost effective. You’ll
reach fewer eyes but the ones you do reach are more likely to be interested in
your product.
IIR: How has
social media affected customer experience?
Ferrazzi: It’s
made feedback instantaneous. You know immediately whether your customer’s had a
good or bad experience. The customer is far more empowered and a dissatisfied
customer is always more likely to voice his or her opinion. One bad meal, one
rude CSR, and Twitter, Facebook, Reddit knows immediately. You can see that as
a problem, or you can use that same medium to show how much you value your
customers.
IIR: How do
you make the connections between experience, brand and loyalty, which
together create customer expectations?
Ferrazzi: Understanding
what your brand brings to your customers, not just in the specific goods or
services, but in the visceral experience, is critical. Even if you are your
brand, is your audience one who is looking for something posh or homey?
Luxurious or utilitarian? Intellectually rigorous or practical? Know what
emotional need your fulfilling in addition the good or service you’re
providing, and you’ll turn a generic transaction into an “experience”
which will trigger loyalty. 
Want to hear more
from Keith on customer experience in person? Join him at Total Customer
Experience Leaders Summit 2014 in Miami in April. Mention code TCEL14LI
& Save 15% off the standard rate. Register today
: http://bit.ly/1f1N97M
Cheers,
The TCEL Team
@TotalCustomer