Tag Archives: FocusVision

Whole Brain Thinking: The New Insights Mindset

By: Steve August
In the September 2016 issue of Harvard Business Review, there is a remarkable article titled
‘Building and Insights Engine.’ Its three co-authors, Frank van den Driest of
Kantar Vermeer, Stan Sthanunathan, and Keith Weed of Unilever, describe how the
results of a research study with over 350 businesses and nearly 10,000
practitioners show that the highest performing companies put the customer at
the center of their activities through an a dynamic insights and analytics
function.
But what was even more fascinating, was how the the authors
laid out a blueprint for the optimal characteristics of what they term an
‘insights engine.’  

Ten Characteristics of an Effective Insights
Engine

According to the authors, the blueprint for an effective
insights engine consists of ten characteristics: seven operational
characteristics and three people characteristics. The seven operational characteristics
are:

‘    
Data synthesis (ability to connect disparate data)
‘    
Independence
‘    
Integrated planning
‘    
Collaboration
‘    
Experimentation
‘    
Forward looking orientation
‘    
Affinity for action
The critical people characteristics as:
‘    
Whole-brain mindset
‘    
Business focus
‘    
Storytelling
It is easy to look to focus on the seven operational
characteristics, but actually it is first of the three people characteristics
that is especially important – as it underpins all of the other operational
aspects. As the authors state, ‘Whole-brain
thinking is at the core of the insights engine.’  
This is an extraordinarily important point. Historically,
insights teams are organized with left-brain quant and analytics people working
separately from the creative right-brain qualitative team members. However, the
research showed that a differentiating attribute of the high performing
organizations was their ability to integrated the two types of thinking: 71%
for the high performing organizations versus 42% for the underperforming ones.
In a sense, one of the key underpinnings of a successful organization is how
well its people can draw on both right and left brain thinking. Or to put it
another way, the degree in which an organization can have a whole-brain mindset
can very well determine how successful a company will be.
These findings send an important message to the insights
industry. So often quant and qual efforts work in parallel or in sequence, but
not truly together. We often treat our analytical thinking and our creative and
storytelling thinking as two separate efforts, when more than ever they need to
be truly integrated. We need to be able to make connections between what we
find in the voluminous amounts of data at our disposal and the first hand
observations of the ground truth of people’s behaviors – and then collaborate
with our stakeholders translate what we learn into compelling stories that
drive action.
Van den Driest, Sthanunathan, Weed summed it up brilliantly
at the close of their article:
Having troves of data
is of little value in and of itself. What increasingly separates the winners
from the losers is the ability to transform data into insights about consumers’
motivations and to turn those insights into strategy.’
The authors showed that a truly effective insights function
is as much about how people think as is it about operational capacity. It is
time for the insights industry to embrace whole-brain thinking.  
About the Author: Steve
August is the CMO of FocusVision, the global leader in market research
technology. A pioneer in online qualitative research, Steve created Revelation,
the industry leading platform for mobile diaries, insight communities and
bulletin boards. Apart from speaking and hosting an array of conferences, he is
fascinated with design, technology and smart methodology’and how they can be
fused to get to the heart of everyday moments that reveal people’s emotions and
behaviors.

Top 3 Trends in Mobile Surveys

By: Aaron Jue,
FocusVision
Each year, we analyze the millions of surveys hosted on our
online survey platform, Decipher, to get insights into respondent survey-taking
behaviors and investigate the latest mobile survey trends including these three
key trends market researchers need to know.
Trend #1: Online survey starts from smartphone devices continue to grow
Mobile devices represent close to 30% of all survey starts
(Figure 1). The mobile growth trend in online surveys follows the overall
global trend of device usage. Industry analysts forecast smartphone
subscriptions from 2015 will double to 6.4 billion worldwide by 2021.[1]
As smartphones increasingly replace the PC for primary
internet usage, we expect that the population of smartphone survey takers will
follow the same trend.
Trend
#2: Mobile friendly surveys = improved participation rates
Mobile survey participation rates have steadily improved
while participation rates for desktop users have remained stable.
This reflects Decipher client projects which, over the
years, have increasingly deployed mobile friendly surveys.  We’re constantly discussing best survey design
practices for mobile devices and these have been tested and put to good
use.  By default all surveys hosted on
the Decipher platform employ a responsive survey design with options for many
dynamic and mobile friendly question types (e.g. card sort,  buttons).
Researchers are adjusting to the needs of the growing usage
for mobile devices, and survey designs have gotten better and smarter.
Trend #3: Mobile penetration depends on sample source
The level of mobile participation for a given survey depends
on the sample characteristics. It is known, for instance that in the US,
minority groups, youths, and upper income individuals show higher incidence of
smartphone use.[2]
Whether a survey employs panel sample or client supplied
sample (e.g. list of customers) has a tremendous impact as well.When a
client-supplied list is used, more than a quarter of respondents access the
survey using a smartphone; that number falls to 10% for panel respondents
(Figure 2).
Panel supplied sample has always had far fewer smartphone
survey takers.  We suspect that’s because
this population expects to receive surveys, and will use a PC out of habit or
for the better survey-user experience (i.e. larger screen size, mouse /
keyboard input). But the number of mobile panel members is growing and has more
than doubled since 2013.  Besides the
increasing reliance on smartphone devices to access the internet,  the growing industry acceptance and
deployment of smartphone friendly survey designs are undoubtedly driving this
trend.
Things Market
Researchers MUST Consider in 2016
As the mobile population continue to grow, it’s becoming
increasingly clear that researchers must adhere to mobile friendly principles
for online surveys. We can no longer simply resize surveys designed for the PC
and serve them on a smartphone without any regard for the smaller screen. It
leaves respondents frustrated with tiny text, input buttons, or horizontal
scales partially cut off from view. A survey that is friendly and optimized
across all platforms drives better data and higher respondent participation.
About Aaron Jue, FocusVision Market Research Director
With more than 10
years of full-service online survey knowledge and research, Aaron keeps
FocusVision at the forefront of new market research trends and best survey
design practices to maximize response rates and data quality. His role is to
capture key internal business performance metrics and FV customer insights.

[1]

http://www.ericsson.com/res/docs/2015/mobility-report/ericsson-mobility-report-nov-2015.pdf

[2]

http://www.pewinternet.org/files/2015/03/PI_Smartphones_0401151.pdf

Level Up: The Possibilities Brought to Life by Pok??mon GO

By Zoe Dowling, Lead
Research Strategist, FocusVision
In the few weeks since Pok??mon GO’s US release, it’s become
a hands down winner for this summer’s ‘craze’. Future generations will likely reflect
on these times with the same fondness as with the hula-hoop or (more recently)
the ice bucket challenge ‘ but for smartphones the needle has forever been
moved.
A Friday evening walk on Los Angeles’ Redondo Beach Pier
mirrored many landmark locations around the country ‘ a majority of visitors on
the Pok??mon hunt, many of whom came furnished with mobile battery packs and
chargers. Beyond the volume of active players, it was striking to note how
inclusive the game is ‘ from tweens to grandpas; from individuals and couples
to groups, everyone wanted to catch ‘em all.
What drove Pok??mon
GO’s unprecedented popularity?
Given the inclusive fan base of the game, its popularity
isn’t just a result of the 90′s kids eagerly reliving their youth, nor is it simply
techies delighting in the technological convergence and execution. While these
are contributing factors, there’s more going on.
Pok??mon GO is
accessible
The internet, social media and smartphones facilitate a
connectivity and global reach to the extent that memes and trends spread almost
instantaneously. News about the game swept across the country and the globe.
People want to be part of the newest trend.
At the same time, the game’s easy (and free) entry allows
anyone with a smartphone to participate themselves. Within minutes of opening
the app, you experience the wonder of being virtually positioned within your
physical location and catch your very first Pok??mon where Augmented Reality
delights. Perhaps also Pok??mon GO highlights the universal popularity of mobile
casual gaming, although maybe for the first time it becomes a visible, in fact
public, activity.
Pok??mon GO merges
technologies in a way that its predecessors didn’t succeed
Maps aren’t new to gamers but location-based gaming appears
to have gone mainstream. The use of GPS and walking your virtual character
around your physical world is very neat.

Aside from tracking your movements on the map, your physical and virtual
location are also linked by Pok??stops. Here you pick up Pok??Balls and other
items to add to your stash while learning about the micro-landmarks in your
immediate vicinity. During my first walk I discovered that my local diner is 40
years old and that the town library gardens are home to a small remembrance
fountain. Not to mention countless, hitherto undetected, Pok??mon to add to my
Pok??dex.
The inclusion of Augmented Reality (AR), which some rightly
say is a limited aspect of the game appearing only when you encounter a Pok??mon
and attempt to catch it, nevertheless delivers one of the most ‘wow’ moments,
being the final convincing glue between your physical and virtual worlds. These
technologies, coupled with classic game elements of a mission based activity
where you are awarded experience points, level ups and engage in traditional
video-game combat, deliver a compelling experience.
Pok??mon GO allows
users to concurrently escape and explore their world
Finally, it’s possible that the game brings a welcome relief
from this year’s bleak newsrooms. It provides a moment of escapism that you can
share, even just with slight smiles and nods, with the people around you.
Bringing us together, albeit for a brief moment, in an increasingly fragmented
world.
 The branded advantage
Whatever the reasons for Pok??mon GO immense success, it has given
us a glimpse of possibilities with geo-location and AR that up until now have
felt more like a futuristic hyperbole. The opportunities extend well beyond the
gaming world. For brands, the race is on to capitalize upon people’s engagement
with the game and drive traffic to their retail environments. Furthermore,
well-considered partnerships can also help position the brand as a player
within the cultural conversation.
McDonald’s Japan became the first official brand partner
with 400 restaurants as ‘gyms’ and the remaining 2,500 sponsored Pok??stops but
there’s also been many instances of unofficial linkage with signs on shop
windows offering ’10% discount for any Pok??mon captured here’ and countless
social media posts by brands all eager to be part of the moment.
Will Pok??mon GO
impact market research?
It’s hard not to start considering the implications for
research. From an immediate perspective the smartphone message, which should
already be loud and clear, is booming. People have smartphones. People are
using smartphones. This is where we’ll find them.
The willingness to use GPS and having your movements mapped
is an interesting one. In many ways, people already give out this information
freely with check-ins on various social media and review sites but perhaps this
takes it to a new level.
What would a shopper journey look like using an app with a
map overlay? What if there were virtual items within the retail environment
that people found during their journey to signal a feedback loop? What if we
could use AR to have people select items from a set of features and overlay
them to create a view of the environment as they’d like to see it?
In matter of few short weeks, this type of interaction with
research respondents feels entirely possible rather than a pipe dream. The
challenge now ‘ turning the potential into a reality.
Happy hunting!
About the Author: Zo?? Dowling
is the Lead Research Strategist for FocusVision, the global leader in research
technology. Her extensive background includes quantitative and qualitative
research design, data collection, analysis and report writing. She is an expert
in internet and mobile research, specializing in respondent engagement, as well
as online and offline qualitative approaches, including interviews, focus
groups and usability testing. For more information, visit FocusVision.com.