Tag Archives: FOCI14

Recap: The Future of Consumer Intelligence 2014

Imagine a line drawn in the sand that is filled with hot burning coals. To the left of the burning line stands a group of people. And to the right of the burning line stands another group of people. The group of people on the left are all directly facing the burning line drawn in the sand and are staring at the opposing group. The group on the right are also all facing the burning line drawn in the sand, staring directly at the group on the left.
The burning line drawn in the sand represents trust. The group of people on the left believe they are entitled to the right group’s trust because they are trying to help them. The group on the right believes trust is earned and will not easily give it to the group on the left. The tug of war between the two groups over trust causes friction and creates the burning line drawn in the sand that neither can cross without the right tools.
The above scenario is analogous to what was presented at the recent 2014 Future of Consumer Intelligence conference (#FOCI14). The group to the left was Big Business, the group to the right was the Public and we as attendees were willing and able to sit right on the burning line drawn in the sand and discuss how to bridge the gap between groups.
BIG DATA VS. BIG PRIVACY

As marketers and researchers we love to collect lots of data with the intention of using personal information to improve products, services, and lives. But at what point is it considered invasion of privacy? Do consumers really know how their data is being used, regardless of whatever they agreed to? At FOCI14 it was made evident that as marketers and researchers, we teeter on the brink of ‘Empowerment vs. Endagerment’. The path to maintaining the balance and bridging the gap on the subject of data between Big Business and the Public was made evident: provide clear, concise rules and guidelines for how consumer data is used that moves past legality and into the territory of morality.
MARKETING SCIENCE VS. PEOPLE

Clearly our industry is at a point of disruptive innovation as new technologies and methodologies allow researchers to get a clearer picture of consumer insights. But who are behind all of these insights? That’s right, people. In our industry we label people as consumers, customers, shoppers, respondents, target markets and more. But remember that behind all of our studies are people. And sometimes we can act as a barricade between companies, their brands, and their consumers in an attempt to remain unbiased and objective. So how do we bridge the gap?
For starters, John Havens, Founder of The H(app)athon Project, suggests we can begin by switching out the label ‘consumer’ with ‘customer’. Whereas Elizabeth Merrick, Senior Customer Insights Manager of HSN suggests we consider research as another touch point of the brand, ‘We should allow customers to contribute to a brand, not just consume it.’
So it appears the segue between marketing science and people is essentially personal treatment and recognizing that customers are more than a data point within a spreadsheet.
TECHNOLOGY VS. HUMANIZATION OF DATA

The more I thought about it, FOCI14′s tagline of The Convergence of Technology, Marketing Science & Humanization of Data seemed unintentionally (or perhaps intentionally) dichotomous where both Big Business and the Public were descending upon the line drawn in the sand. So it goes with technology & humanization.
There is no doubt that technology improves lives at blistering speeds. Ray Kurzweil, Director of Engineering for Google pointed out that, ‘Information Technology expands exponentially across time, not linearly.’ But as we become more technologically advanced, do we lose a piece of our humanity and our identity?
As we discussed more and more about the subjects of technological advances, psychological habits, triggers, and touch points at FOCI14, it seemed the key to closing the gap between technology & humanization of data relied upon engagement. If new technologies enable to us to engage with customers in a more 
meaningful way and people are able to build stronger psychological connections with each other, then the gap is bridged. If on the other hand, the research community were to stand disengaged with customers and people, then technology & humanization in the field will stand diametrically opposed on a bridge that is about to collapse.
So the real question in all of this is, ‘Has your organization bridged the line drawn in the sand’?
Editors Note: This post was written by MrChrisRuby, an award-winning expert Marketing Research & Consumer Insights Executive who has consulted with several Fortune 500 companies. He is passionate about morphing data into actionable marketing intelligence that augments business operations. Follow MrChrisRuby on Twitter @MrChrisRuby, email him at mrchrisruby@gmail.com or read The Market Research Insider blog.

Recap: The Future of Consumer Intelligence 2014

Imagine a line drawn in the sand that is filled with hot
burning coals. To the left of the burning line stands
a group of people. And to the right of the burning line stands another group of people. The
group of people on the left are all directly facing the burning line drawn in the
sand and are staring at the opposing group. The group on the right are also all facing
the burning line drawn in the sand, staring directly at the group on the left.
The burning line drawn in the sand represents trust. The
group of people on the left believe they are entitled to the right group’s
trust because they are trying to help them. The group on the right believes
trust is earned and will not easily give it to the group on the left. The tug of
war between the two groups over trust causes friction and creates the burning
line drawn in the sand that neither can cross without the right tools.
The above scenario is analogous to what was presented at the
recent 2014 Future of Consumer Intelligence conference (#FOCI14). The group to the left was Big Business, the group to the right was the Public and we as
attendees were willing and able to sit right on the burning line drawn in the sand and
discuss how to bridge the gap between groups.

BIG DATA VS. BIG PRIVACY

As marketers and researchers we love to collect lots of data
with the intention of using personal information to improve products, services,
and lives. But at what point is it considered invasion of privacy? Do consumers
really know how their data is being used, regardless of whatever they agreed
to? At FOCI14 it was made evident that as marketers and researchers, we teeter
on the brink of ‘Empowerment vs. Endagerment’. The path to maintaining the
balance and bridging the gap on the subject of data between Big Business and
the Public was made evident: provide clear, concise rules and guidelines for
how consumer data is used that moves past legality and into the territory of
morality.
MARKETING SCIENCE VS. PEOPLE
Clearly our industry is at a point of disruptive innovation as
new technologies and methodologies allow researchers to get a clearer picture
of consumer insights. But who are behind all of these insights? That’s right,
people. In our industry we label people as consumers, customers, shoppers,
respondents, target markets and more. But remember that behind all of our
studies are people. And sometimes we can act as a barricade between companies,
their brands, and their consumers in an attempt to remain unbiased and objective. So how do we
bridge the gap?
For starters, John Havens, Founder of The H(app)athon Project, suggests we
can begin by switching out the label ‘consumer’ with ‘customer’. Whereas Elizabeth
Merrick, Senior Customer Insights Manager of HSN suggests we consider research
as another touch point of the brand, ‘We should allow customers to contribute
to a brand, not just consume it.’
So it appears the segue between marketing science and people
is essentially personal treatment and recognizing that customers are more than
a data point within a spreadsheet.

From John Havens, The H(app)athon Project
TECHNOLOGY VS. HUMANIZATION OF DATA
The more I thought about it, FOCI14′s tagline of The Convergence of Technology, Marketing
Science & Humanization of Data seemed unintentionally (or perhaps intentionally) dichotomous where both Big Business and the Public were descending upon the line drawn in the sand. So
it goes with technology & humanization.
There is no doubt that technology improves lives at
blistering speeds. Ray Kurzweil, Director of Engineering for Google pointed
out that, ‘Information Technology expands exponentially across time, not
linearly.’ But as we become more technologically advanced, do we lose a piece
of our humanity and our identity?
As we discussed more and more about the subjects of technological advances, psychological
habits, triggers, and touch points at FOCI14, it seemed the key to closing the
gap between technology & humanization of data relied upon engagement. If new
technologies enable to us to engage with customers in a more meaningful way and
people are able to build stronger psychological connections with each other,
then the gap is bridged. If on the other
hand, the research community were to stand disengaged with customers and people, then technology & humanization in
the field will stand diametrically opposed on a bridge that is about to
collapse.
So the real question in all of this is, ‘Has your
organization bridged the line drawn in the sand’?

Tom Krause, VP of Client Services, Gongos Research
“It’s all about people”
Chris Ruby is an award-winning Marketing Research & Consumer Insights Executive with Fortune 500 consulting experience. His niche is the ability to turn complex data into compelling stories that induce a call for action among key decision-makers. His work has been featured by MRA, MRIA, IIR, Norstat Times, Chadwick Martin Bailey & the Optimization Group. Keep up with Chris Ruby by following him on Twitter @ChrisRubyMRX or by reading the Chris Ruby Market Research Blog.

Research & Branding Join Forces

When you think of a brand does research as a part of the
brand typically come to mind? Well in HSN’s world it does (formerly Home
Shopping Network).

Elizabeth Merrick, Senior Customer Insights Manager of HSN and Katy Mallios,
Consumer Insights & Intelligence Consultant of Spych Market Analytics, gave
an amazing presentation at The Future of Consumer Intelligence Conference
2014 entitled, “Customer Insights as a Brand Engagement Tool.

In essence HSN considers market research as an opportunity
to personally engage with their customers in a very customized and tailored way
that acts as another touch point of the overall customer experience. 
Sometimes,
Consumer Insights departments almost act as a barricade between the brand and
the customer. HSN seems to have found a happy medium between the two. Herrick
explains, “We are no longer researchers but brand facilitators. We want
our core customers to participate and contribute to our brand, not just consume
it.”
In fact, members of  their research community have
become so engaged with the brand that they willingly receive exclusive
non-monetary incentives to engage with the HSN brand instead of monetary
incentives. How would you like to have a birthday party with Wolfgang Puck as
an incentive? Well, one of the HSN Insiders did LIVE on the air. The result, an
extremely engaged research community that strengthens the research, the 
brand and the overall customer experience. (By the way, the HSN Insiders formed
their own Facebook group. Has your company’s research community formed theirs?)

MrChrisRuby is
an award-winning expert Marketing Research & Consumer Insights Executive
who has consulted with several Fortune 500 companies. He is passionate about
augmenting product development, the customer experience & corporate
revenue. Follow MrChrisRuby on Twitter @MrChrisRuby,
email him at mrchrisruby@gmail.com or
read The Market
Research Insider
 blog. 

Privacy by Design: Are you planning for privacy or getting into trouble due insufficient privacy?

Today’s talk on Big Privacy and Privacy By Design by Ann
Cavoukian was my favourite of the day. She spoke mainly in relation to big
data but everything she had to say relates to completely to all aspects of
marketing research.  She is responsible
for the Privacy By Design concept which has seven foundation principles. Here are
the principles along with my thoughts on how they relate to traditional
research methods.
  1. 1.     
    Be proactive not reactive: In a research
    business, many employees have access to personal information. This includes the
    database team that is responsible for housing information like names, email
    addresses, and data about children and income. A proactive survey team is one
    that identifies technical weaknesses that might make the databases susceptible
    to hacking. A proactive team also includes the project management folks who are there to ensure
    that survey authors don’t ask questions that could reveal private information
    or, at least, ensures that if private information must be asked, that
    responders are aware and this information will be handled with the utmost in care. Everyone is responsible for ensuring that any potential privacy problems are identified and dealt with before they actually become problems.
  2. 2.     
    Privacy is the default setting. In this area,
    survey responders should never have to check with a research company to find out if their privacy will be
    maintained. Their data should be automatically encrypted and stored behind lock
    and key, as well as anonymized at every possible opportunity. Without asking.
    Ever.
  3. 3.     
    Privacy is embedded into the design. Privacy
    features should never be part of agile programming. It should be planned. If
    you’re going to build a brand new mobile survey app or website tracking system,
    privacy features should be planned and built in from day one. Programmers will
    always tell you that add-on features are far less stable and reliable than
    planned systems so do it right from the beginning.
  4. 4.     
    Full functionality such that it is positive sum
    not zero sum
    . Marketing research is founded in the trust that our research
    participants have in us. The more we can prove to them, demonstrate to them,
    that we are doing our utmost best to maintain their privacy, the better it will
    be for us and for them. They retain their privacy and are assured that the
    opinions they share with us will always be confidential. We, on the other hand,
    make our responders happy thereby retaining them as responders, happy
    responders, for much longer. Privacy truly is a win win situation.
  5. 5.     
    End-to-end security. Have you ever tried to
    unsubscribe from a newsletter, only to have to jump through hoops to find an
    unsubscribe button and then still try to figure out which email address to type
    into the unsubscribe box? Well, that is a perfect example of poor design for a
    departing client. When research participants want to join a panel, leave a
    panel, see their information, or delete their information, it should be easy
    and it should be complete. And of course, these processes should be planned and
    built into the system to avoid bothersome hoops.
  6. 6.     
    Visible and transparent. Have a privacy policy.
    If you don’t, you’re already in big trouble. Have a full explained policy and an
    easier to read policy. Explain how research data is used, how it is stored, how it is shared, and when it is deleted. The more open you can be, the more your research
    participants will appreciate you and stick with you. Again, it’s a win win situation.
  7. 7.     
    Respect for user privacy. Remember that you
    would not have a business without the people who answer your surveys or
    participate in your focus groups. Treat them well. Treat them as you’d wish to
    be treated. If there are things that you wish you knew about the research
    process, chances are that your research participants also want to know. So tell
    them. And tell them nicely.

 
And on a completely unrelated note, did you know that Ann’s
brother is Raffi, a very popular children’s entertainer? When I was a babysitter, putting on a Raffi  ‘record’ was a great way to quiet kids down and get them to bed. The Cavoukian family is certainly accomplished!
Annie Pettit, PhD is the Chief Research Officer at Peanut Labs, a company specializing in self-serve panel sample. Annie is a methodologist focused on data quality, listening research, and survey methods. She won Best Methodological Paper at Esomar 2013, and the 2011 AMA David K. Hardin Award. Annie tweets at @LoveStats and can be reached at annie@peanutlabs.com.

Are you Pinterested? A Fashion Brand Evolves Research Communities

@JaclynDecell from Rachel Zoe Inc presented on, ‘The Insightful
Consumer: Using Social Signals to Drive Business Decisions.’ And this company
is doing something very cool.

The company is launching a pilot of a new kind of online
insights community: it’s a Pinterest community. People are being recruited to
the ‘Zoe Insiders’ shared boards. In exchange, they get exclusive access, such
as sneak peeks to new fashion collections, exclusive content and they may even
have the chance to be on the Rachel Zoe site (their 5 minutes fame?). No monetary
incentives.

Pinterest is a fascinating choice, since it’s all about images. Which certainly makes
sense for a fashion brand. And if you haven’t yet checked it out, Pinterest is HUGE.
And addictive. Check out this Mashable infographic
on why it is so addictive.

The shared Pinterest boards will be moderated, though the speaker
felt this wasn’t too big a challenge’as the participants are being heavily
curated to make sure they are on point with the brand and goals.

But where is the market research? While the Pinterest project
is new (it’s in pilot), the company has been leveraging social media insights
from other channels for some time’and the Pinterest project is just the next
generation of it. Jaclyn says that when people share content from or about the brand on
any social media channel, it’s an indication of the customer journey. Seeing
what they share can reveal what types of editorial and imagery Rachel Zoe should
be creating. Nail-related items are hot? Black and white images hot? This information
can inform editorial choices, content creation choices’allowing the company to really
be responsive.


Will this replace a deep analysis of brand perceptions or customer
satisfaction measurements? Of course not. But it is a fast, continuous way to
respond to customer wants and passions. And that is pretty cool.
 
This post was written by Kathryn Korostoff. Kathryn is the President of Research Rockstar, the only independent company dedicated to market research training (online and in-person).  Many of Research Rockstar’s classes are MRA-certified, and Research Rockstar offers class bundles leading to MRA Certification. She also currently serves as President for the MRA’s New England chapter.  KKorostoff@ResearchRockstar.com, 508.691.6004 ext 705, @ResearchRocks

Creating, Curating and Socializing Insights in a Time Compressed World

Who knew that the first phone was born by AT&T in 1876, 138 years ago? And that the iPhone is already 7 years old?

 

Speed and faster time to insights was aptly showcased  with the telecom industry where competition is high and brand loyalty is pervasively low. Your phone is, after all, the remote control of your life. Well expressed by AT&T and SKIM.

The key message of nobody has time resonates with a plethora of industries in a hyper competitive world, which is fast changing, mandating extremely targeted insights and very short timelines.

 

Amongst the key takeaways that will shortly be updated on the site, some of the more actionable ones included:

  • Having a seamless team that is cross functional with key stakeholders. Align, align and align.
  • Know what your stakeholders DON’T want, its a twist on knowing what they want.
  • Keep it brief and actionable (12 slides!)
  • Think lean: keep things seamless, transparent.
Sourabh Sharma,
Communication & Social Media Research Expert at SKIM, an international
consultancy and marketing research agency, has a background in engineering,
marketing and finance from the University of Pennsylvania, and the Wharton
School and Rotterdam School of Management. Having worked in marketing and
product development at L’Oreal, followed by a stint in management consulting,
he now passionately enjoys the world of social media, and can be found on every
platform with his alias sssourabh. He is a food critic and a fashion writer,
and documents these alongside strategy on his blog called
3FS. He may be reached at s.sharma@skimgroup.com.
Follow him on
@sssourabh.

The Secret Sauce Behind Word-Of-Mouth Advertising

It’s day 2 of the
Future of Consumer Intelligence conference and one big trend is forming: Word
of Mouth is important’ very important.
Several of the speakers have touched on
the relevance of Word of Mouth in today’s advertising playground. On day 1 we
had a panel of Millennials that discussed things they’re interested in and what
makes them tick. Almost all of them mentioned how they rely heavily upon Word of
Mouth platforms like Yelp and YouTube. The groundwork was set around this topic
and Jonah Berger drove it home in this morning’s keynote presentation.
Author of the book
Contagious: Why Things Catch On, Berger shared a few key points from his book. Here
are a few of the things that struck me:

Expand your Word of
Mouth advertising by focusing on the people who already love your product

Berger made the point that
people error in thinking that trying to reach out to a targeted group of
non-users is the best way to increase Word of Mouth. In other words, finding
people who match the profile of your current customer. Berger argues that the
best way to increase Word of Mouth is to let the people who already know and
love you do it. To explain this view, he used an example from his work as a
professor. Berger mentioned that publishers often send professors free books in
the mail, with the hope of including the book in the curriculum. One time he
received a package from a publisher with two copies of the same book. The books
came with a note, ‘We think you’ll know someone who will love this book too’. This
publisher knew that Berger would be the best advocate for the book and would be
able to target and share the book with someone who would really enjoy it.

Being a ‘secret’ is
valuable

Berger gives two
examples of this concept. The first example was a bar in NY called Please Don’t
Tell. This bar has no advertising and requires people to go into a phone booth
and use a rotary dial phone in order to enter. The bar is so popular that to
get in you must have a reservation. This bar leverages the element of secrecy
to grow its Word of Mouth advertising. People enjoy being able to be the first
person to introduce someone to the bar.
The other example he
gave was the McRib at McDonalds. Berger states that the McRib was introduced to
help defuse the demand for chicken nuggets. Over time McDonalds has kept the
McRib on the menu but never at the same time in each region. By strategically
altering when and where the McRib is featured has created a rather humorous
following. There is actually a website designed to help people know when and
where the McRib is on the menu.

Top-of-mind means tip-of-tongue

Berger points out that
one of the key attributes of successful Word of Mouth advertising is getting
people to think about your product or service indirectly. He believes it’s
important to link yourself to things that are used frequently. A good example
is peanut butter and jelly. When people say peanut butter, most people begin to
think about jelly as well. Another is example is how Corona has tried to
position itself with the beach. The idea is to get people to think about Corona
when they visit the beach.

I think Berger did a
great job at trying to put a ‘formula’ behind a popular strategy. The bad news?
It’s only a matter of time before this strategy is diluted. Marketers are
famous for beating a strategy to death. Think of email’. When email first came
out, email open rates were ridiculously high. Now-a-days most people are happy
with an open rate in the single digits. How long will this strategy be
effective? It’s hard to put a number on it but don’t wait around because it won’t
be long.
Follow the conference on Twitter by tracking the hashtag #FOCI14

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Isaiah Adams is the Manager of Social Media Development at Optimization Group, a marketing research and analytics firm that uses cutting edge technology to help clients make fact-based decisions. Optimization Group has a dedicated place on its site where agencies can learn how to use research to help their clients succeed called the Advertising Agency Hub.
Follow Optimization Group on Twitter @optimizationgrp

Top 8 Takeaways on Privacy

One of the overlying themes of this year’s Future of
Consumer Intelligence conference is consumer privacy and the concept of
“Empowerment vs. Endangerment” as it relates to the handling and
usage of data. As researchers, we collect , analyze and utilize consumers’
information to improve products, services and the customer experience.
But really, the true question posed in all of this is,
“Where do we draw the line in privacy practices?”  Regardless of
whatever privacy policies consumers have agreed to (without actually reading
the pages and pages of fine print) they still expect companies to act
responsibility with their digital imprint. 
So here are the top 8 takeaways from today’s discussions
about consumer privacy:

1. Businesses typically dictate terms of privacy for consumers.
However, consumers should have the right to 
dictate their own terms and
conditions of privacy to businesses because it is their identify
2. We need need to move past the legality of consumer privacy
and responsibly consider the morality of consumer privacy within our agreements
3. Clarity is essential and needs to be installed within data
collection and data mining privacy guidelines and not be hidden in fine print
4. Consumer trust will increase as better practice guidelines
are built into frameworks and agreements
5. Location privacy is a fundamental part of who we are as our
location reveals our tastes, preferences and identities
6. Privacy equals control and consumers should control their
data and have freedom of choice as to how, where and when it is used
7. Privacy by design should be built into our studies and
framework. Yes it costs $$. But preventing a breach will save you even more $$

8. Embed privacy by design into initial frameworks because they
are harder to change down the line
 
MrChrisRuby is
an award-winning expert Marketing Research & Consumer Insights Executive
who has consulted with several Fortune 500 companies. He is passionate about
augmenting product development, the customer experience & corporate
revenue. Follow MrChrisRuby on Twitter @MrChrisRuby,
email him at mrchrisruby@gmail.com or
read The Market
Research Insider
 blog.

Top 10 Jonah Berger Inspirations at FOCI14

Jonah Berger, and his latest book, ‘Contagious:
Why Things Catch On
‘ was one of our keynotes today at FOCI14. Not to be too
much of a fangirl, but Jonah is the speaker I was most eager to see at FOCI14.  

Following are my top 10 quotes from his presentation (and picking
only ten was hard!):

1.      
How tasty are your messages? More like broccoli
or more like a cheeseburger? And can we make our messages tastier?

2.      
‘Word of mouth generates more than twice the
sales of advertising,’ a famous McKinsey & Company quote. And if we want to
understand WOM, we have to understand why things catch on (thus his book).

3.      
A book publisher sent him 2 copies of a book
that they wanted him to recommend to his students. They said, here is a copy for
you to review, and please share the second copy with another person you may know
who might enjoy it. So they basically enlisted him to help with WOM: they knew
he would be likely to be connected to other qualified people. Jonah describes
this (positively) as a marketing ‘hack.’

4.      
7% of all WOM is online. Yes, 7%. Most WOM is
offline. It’s more important to understand why people share, not how they
share.

5.      
6 key attributes to getting things shared/spread/WOM:
Social Currency, Triggered, Emotion, Public, Practical Value, Stories. 

6.      
‘Secrets’ knowing things others don’t know is a
form of social currency. People like to share inside information. Making people feel like insiders:
powerful motivator of preference, WOM Story of the ‘secret’ bar in NYC that is
always booked (I found an article about PDT: link).

7.      
How did a company get 200M views of a video
about blenders? They blended an iPhone. The key: Surprising, Novel, or Interesting.
(WillitBlend.com) A totally mundane product’a blender’and sales went up over
700%. (doing something crazy just for crazy is not effective/doing something
crazy that is on point, that is effective)

8.      
Kit Kat sales down, so they launch a campaign to
associate it with break time. Break time was a good choice to associate with
because break time happens frequently. It’s a trigger.

9.      
‘Social proof’: in a strange city, you pick a crowded
restaurant (not an empty one)’you see the other people as a signal of
information. If we can’t see what people are doing, we can’t use it as a
signal. So how do we make the private public? A restaurant can have a big window
so you can see the crowd.  (Apple made their
headphones white’it became a signal. Easier to see, easier to imitate.) What
can you do to make your private public?

10.  
Good stories are ‘Trojan horse stories’. They
have a hidden message.  Subway’s Jarrod
story: tells us you can eat their sandwiches and be healthy.

Thank you Jonah!!!!
This post was written by Kathryn Korostoff. Kathryn is currently the President of Research Rockstar, the only independent company dedicated to market research training (online and in-person).  Prior to Research Rockstar, Kathryn completed the transition of Sage Research’an agency that she led for 13 years’to its new parent company, Chadwick Martin Bailey. Over the past 25 years, she has directed more than 600 primary market research projects and published over 100 bylined articles in various magazines, including Quirk’s Marketing Research Review and the MRA’s Alert! Magazine. She also currently serves as President for the MRA’s New England chapter.   KKorostoff@ResearchRockstar.com, 508.691.6004 ext 705, @ResearchRocks. She offers a gift to her new FOCI friends here: LINK.

Formulas for (Market Research) Success

On Day 1 of FOCI, two of my favorite speakers shared formulas
for describing important concepts. Are formulas always perfect? No. But they do
give us a fresh way think about some complex issues. And these formulas may even help us to be inspired by this conference’s tag line, “Think Harder.”


Formula for Thinking Harder #1

Bill Grizack,
Executive Director at Egg Strategy, gave us a formula for understanding how to
help new ideas succeed. As Bill described it, ‘Ideas have mass and velocity.
And if an idea has enough mass and velocity, it has momentum.”  Applying the classic physics formula Mass x Velocity
= Momentum.

As I listened, I couldn’t help but think that this applies to
us market researchers in two ways:

??      
It applies to how we think about product concept
testing. In these projects we are often seeking to prioritize product
attributes or gauge overall alignment with market needs. But listening to Bill,
it seems like part of the process should also include uncovering attitudes or
behaviors that might help an idea have ‘mass’ and ‘velocity.’  Can we think about how to structure research to
uncover likely mass and velocity factors? Could this broaden current thinking
which often focusses on ‘demand drivers and deterrents’?

??      
It applies to market research itself.  It often seems like we have a lot of great
ideas for market research innovation, and that they have big mass, but not
enough velocity’and thus no real momentum. 
How can we think about the velocity part of the equation to help us finally
get momentum on some of these ideas? Or at least to understand which of the
many ideas are likely to succeed based on existing ‘velocity’ indicators?

Formula for Thinking Harder #2

Our opening night keynote speaker, Nir Eyal of NirandFar.com, shared his formula for
changing behavior. Nir stated, ‘If we have sufficient motivation and sufficient
ability AND you have a trigger, the behavior should occur.’ He summarized this
with the formula: Behavior = Motivation + Ability + Trigger (which he
attributed to BJ Fogg).

Now while he didn’t specifically connect this to market
research, I think this also gives us a framework to think about product concept
testing research. We often struggle when researching products that are
revolutionary (versus evolutionary). We researchers know very well that you can’t
get good insights by asking people for direct feedback on radically new product
concepts: it tends to be too hypothetical. Sure we can use research to identify
potential drivers and deterrents for radical product ideas, but it’s risky.

But what if we used Nir’s angle? When researching revolutionary
products, we could structure parts of the research to discover potential
motivations, abilities and triggers of interest. It would still be a bit hypothetical,
but the idea of using a framework consisting of three distinct components
appeals to me. We could even go as far as asking the customers (people from the
likely target market) to help us brainstorm motivations, abilities and triggers’now
that is a project I would like to try!

What About You?

I wonder what formulas market researchers could come up with.
What’s the formula for project success? What’s the formula for panel quality? Or
for executive satisfaction with research insights? If you want to propose any,
let us know using the comments below.
This post was written by Kathryn Korostoff. Kathryn is currently the President of Research Rockstar, the only
independent company dedicated to market research training (online and
in-person).  Prior to Research Rockstar,
Kathryn completed the transition of Sage Research’an agency that she led for 13
years’to its new parent company, Chadwick Martin Bailey. Over the past 25 years, she has directed more than 600
primary market research projects and published over 100 bylined articles in
various magazines, including Quirk’s Marketing Research Review and the MRA’s
Alert! Magazine. She also currently serves as President for the MRA’s New England
chapter;

Contact Information: KKorostoff@ResearchRockstar.com,
508.691.6004 ext 705, @ResearchRocks