Tag Archives: foci

Creating, Curating and Socializing Insights in a Time Compressed World

Who knew that the first phone was born by AT&T in 1876, 138 years ago? And that the iPhone is already 7 years old?

 

Speed and faster time to insights was aptly showcased  with the telecom industry where competition is high and brand loyalty is pervasively low. Your phone is, after all, the remote control of your life. Well expressed by AT&T and SKIM.

The key message of nobody has time resonates with a plethora of industries in a hyper competitive world, which is fast changing, mandating extremely targeted insights and very short timelines.

 

Amongst the key takeaways that will shortly be updated on the site, some of the more actionable ones included:

  • Having a seamless team that is cross functional with key stakeholders. Align, align and align.
  • Know what your stakeholders DON’T want, its a twist on knowing what they want.
  • Keep it brief and actionable (12 slides!)
  • Think lean: keep things seamless, transparent.
Sourabh Sharma,
Communication & Social Media Research Expert at SKIM, an international
consultancy and marketing research agency, has a background in engineering,
marketing and finance from the University of Pennsylvania, and the Wharton
School and Rotterdam School of Management. Having worked in marketing and
product development at L’Oreal, followed by a stint in management consulting,
he now passionately enjoys the world of social media, and can be found on every
platform with his alias sssourabh. He is a food critic and a fashion writer,
and documents these alongside strategy on his blog called
3FS. He may be reached at s.sharma@skimgroup.com.
Follow him on
@sssourabh.

World Cup Advertising Wars, Part 2: How to Boost Your Campaigns

Editor’s Note: This
blog post is brought to you by Mattr, a
company that is leading a new era for consumer insights, providing brands with
a deeper, more colorful view into their social audience. Through a unique mix
of personality data and demographics, Marketers can begin to discover what
really makes their audience tick.

Rewind 4 years, and you might recall Adidas and Nike as the
top Marketing contenders for World Cup gear, with Adidas as an official
sponsor, and Nike as their ambush Marketing competitor. Both brands were
extremely successful with their campaigns, partly because the 2010 World Cup
events showed the highest numbers for a sporting event ever on social, providing a great way to increase engagement
amongst soccer fans.
Fast forward to 2014, and not a lot has changed in the
battle of the boots and jerseys. Adidas has again claimed a spot as an official
sponsor, with Nike looming in the background ready to pounce. In fact, Nike
wasted no time, and was the first brand to launch a World Cup
spot
 this year with the inspirational theme ‘Risk Everything’.
And Adidas should take note of Nike’s presence, especially
since Nike brought the pressure last year when Adidas sales slumped in Western Europe. Truth be told, it’s
anyone’s game when it comes to which brand will come out on top after this
year’s World Cup.
Segmentation- From
Planning to Launching

Elaborating on last week’s post, we plan to reveal some
Marketing tactics that might help each of these brands (and smaller brands)
gain the World Cup Marketing advantage, by moving away from the campaign
‘Planning’ phase and into the ‘Active’ phase.

To start, let’s look at the changes in the @FIFAWorldCup
Personas. Last week, the most engaged Persona was ‘Wholesome Males’. Another
sample of tweets this week reveals that ‘Reliable Males’ are now just as
engaged as ‘Wholesome Males’.
So how can brands use this information? Let’s start with
Adidas. They’ve hit social hard for their last few soccer-themed campaigns,
introducing several hashtags (including #FastOrFail for their AdiZero f50 boot,
and #GetReady for their Body Care line). A very smart move on their part.
Now it might also be smart for them to use real-time
segmentation to ‘boost’ any online campaigns running concurrently with their TV
spots. This week, that means speaking to the ‘Wholesome’ and ‘Reliable’
Personas that are actively engaged with @FIFAWorldCup and soccer.
Campaign Content
Shouldn’t Stay Static

Maybe that entails creating some fresh, new content (social,
online advertising, etc) that these Personas can relate to better, because as
mentioned last week, personality types unconsciously ‘Respond To’ or ‘Get
Turned Off’ by certain language. The newly engaged ‘Reliable Male’ Persona
break-down is below:
Popular Hashtags Lead
Back to You

Another way to boost their campaigns might be to use the
favorite hashtags from both Personas, to encourage engagement with the Adidas
campaigns. The current ‘Reliable Male’ favorite hashtag list is below (and what
do you know, #Adidas made the cut). Using these hashtags in addition to the
unique campaign hashtags might bring in more eyeballs from the online soccer
audience who Adidas is looking to sell to.
Next week we’ll look at the @FIFAWorldCup top shared media
and interests, and discuss how Marketers can use that data to make unique media
placement and brand influencer decisions.
Want to look at your own brand audience’s personality
breakdown or favorite hashtags? Click here.
Mattr is a sponsor of
The Future of Consumer Intelligence 2014
taking place next week in Los Angeles, CA. This year, FOCI explores the
emerging role of decision science and the convergence of knowledge points -
insights, foresights, social science, marketing science and intelligence with
technology as a central driving force and profound connector.

As a reader of our
blog, you get an exclusive 15% discount on your FOCI 2014 pass. Use
code FOCI14BLOG when you register: http://bit.ly/RRvQzl

World Cup Advertising Wars: How to Compete with the Big Guys

Editor’s Note: This
blog post is brought to you by Mattr, a
company that is leading a new era for consumer insights, providing brands with
a deeper, more colorful view into their social audience. Through a unique mix
of personality data and demographics, Marketers can begin to discover what
really makes their audience tick.

The World Cup hype has officially started!  And if
you’re in Marketing/ Advertising, you’re probably keeping a close eye on the
various campaigns that have been introduced to pay homage to one of the world’s
most watched sporting events.
Some of the first to release their campaigns were the big
soda brands.  World Cup sponsor Coca-Cola and competitor Pepsi have both
recently launched TV spots, and there’s already lots of chatter on who got it
right
.  That answer might seem subjective to most.  But as
Marketers know, putting together a campaign that speaks to the right audience
takes more than luck.  It takes planning and strategy.  It takes
understanding of various brand segments and how to reach them on a personal
level.  And it takes knowing that powerful stories about the people behind
a brand reside in unfiltered data.
That being said, it can be assumed that both Coca-Cola and
Pepsi did lots of research for their campaigns, utilizing large budgets and
plenty of time to plan (Coca-Cola apparently began planning back
in 2012, and World Cup 2014 stands as their largest campaign ever!).
But for those agencies that might not have the dollars or
time to spend on such intensive research- there are simple ways to accomplish a
similar goal of understanding audiences by looking at some easily accessible
data.  We’ll show you how.  And we’ll also come to our own
conclusion, based on our own data, on which soda brand might have the slight
advantage in the World Cup campaign wars.
Social- The Secret
Sauce

Social has become a very viable option when it comes to
gathering insights about your audience.  It’s as easy as picking a social
segmentation tool and diving in to all of the data.

We’ve started our own segmentation analysis with a
historical snapshot of the FIFA audience, or the last 500 people who have
engaged with @FIFAWorldCup on Twitter.   That breakdown shows the
highest engagement came from ‘Wholesome Males’, as seen below:
‘Wholesome’ indicates personality traits like down-to-earth,
honest, family oriented, sincere, real and sentimental.  A ‘Wholesome’
person might respond best to campaigns based on truth, openness and emotion
(more about ‘Personality Identification’ through social can be found here- very
interesting stuff!).
Hot on the trails of those ‘Wholesome’ males are ‘Rugged’
males, with their own set of unique traits that gets them excited.  It’s
advantageous for Marketers to look into both groups to see what makes each of
them tick.
Hash Out the Hashtags

Now take the analysis a step further, and look at the
‘real-time’ breakdown of the FIFA audience.  In addition to those folks
who are currently engaging with the @FIFAWorldCup Twitter handle, you might
also be interested in the people who are using the top three most popular
Twitter hashtags for the World Cup in general (which are #WorldCup, #Brazil, and
#WorldCup2014).  The new analysis looks like this:
Not surprisingly, the @FIFAWorldCup audience and those using
the most popular World Cup hashtags look very similar.  Looking ahead, a
Marketer can be confident that the ‘Wholesome’ and ‘Rugged’ males should be the
right audience to go after for a campaign.
Your Own Hashtags-
Who’s Engaging?

Last, if you’ve created and launched campaign hashtags, it
might be beneficial to analyze the people who are chiming in with those
hashtags on social, as long as there’s some good traction.  Today, both
Coke and Pepsi have launched hashtags for their World Cup campaigns (#WorldsCup
and #LiveForNow, respectively).  Traction was highest during the release
of the campaigns, and has now subsided.
However, as engagement with these hashtags increases again,
which should be a top goal for both brands, Marketers can analyze what types of
people the online campaigns are attracting and figure out ways to target those
audiences better.  We’ve started a new analysis on Coke’s hashtag
engagement moving forward, and will report back in an upcoming blog.
So what does all of this tell you about launching your own
World Cup (or any other) campaign? The point is that social data matters, and
so do the people behind that data.  If you can dig into that data enough
to understand your audience on a very deep and personal level, then you’ve
automatically pushed ahead of your competition when it comes to planning the
tone and messages within your various campaigns.
Who Wins the Soda
War?

The Coca-Cola campaign plays to inclusiveness, youth,
uniqueness, togetherness, grandiosity and social good (think
‘Wholesome’).  The Pepsi campaign plays towards celebrity, playfulness,
music, creativity, art and fun (think ‘Sophisticated’ or ‘Daring’). 
According to our analysis of the FIFA audience, our vote goes to Coke.
 But hats off to both campaigns!
Next week we’ll take a look at changes to the @FIFAWorldCup
Personas as engagement increases, which might cause Marketers to tweak their
real-time campaigns.  And we’ll compare two new ‘Big Brand’ campaigns that
have staked their claim on the World Cup turf.
Want to start your own segmentation and hashtag analysis?
Click here.
Mattr is a sponsor of
The Future of Consumer Intelligence 2014
taking place next week in Los Angeles, CA. This year, FOCI explores the
emerging role of decision science and the convergence of knowledge points -
insights, foresights, social science, marketing science and intelligence with
technology as a central driving force and profound connector.

As a reader of our
blog, you get an exclusive 15% discount on your FOCI 2014 pass. Use
code FOCI14BLOG when you register: http://bit.ly/RRvQzl

A Look at The Future of Consumer Intelligence

Understanding people (not consumers) across numerous platforms in an increasingly interconnected world mixed with always-on technology, presents an opportunity for you to know people more deeply and take strategic action. Technology is the central driving force amongst the foremost mega and macro trends across industries. In fact, it is advancing at such a fast pace that it is changing how we do things, how we understand the world, business, and even people.
This year, The Future of Consumer Intelligence 2014 explores the emerging role of decision science and the convergence of knowledge points – insights, foresights, social science, marketing science and intelligence with technology a central driving force and profound connector. This cutting-edge event accelerates disruptive thinking around decision science. This unique aggregation of diversity across insights, data science, marketing science, social science with technology as a common thread provokes new questions and explores new futures.
This event accelerates disruptive innovators in the research space and pushes people to take risks, to think outside of traditional research methods and explore new, alternative tools and technologies. You will see in May that FOCI will bridge the gap for you between what people say they are going to do and what they actually do.

For a look at what to expect at FOCI in a few weeks, watch the short video below:

For more information on the event, click here to download the interactive brochure: http://bit.ly/1poyewr
You get an exclusive 15% discount for being a valued reader of our blog. So use your special discount code FOCI14BLOG when you register: http://bit.ly/1rfDFuV

See you in sunny California!

A Look at The Future of Consumer Intelligence

Understanding people (not consumers) across numerous platforms
in an increasingly interconnected world mixed with always-on technology,
presents an opportunity for you to know people more deeply and take strategic
action. Technology is the central driving force amongst the foremost mega and macro
trends across industries. In fact, it is advancing at such a fast pace that it
is changing how we do things, how we understand the world, business, and even people.
This year, The Future of
Consumer Intelligence 2014
explores the emerging role of decision science
and the convergence of knowledge points – insights, foresights, social science,
marketing science and intelligence with technology a central driving force and
profound connector. This cutting-edge event accelerates disruptive thinking
around decision science. This unique aggregation of diversity across insights,
data science, marketing science, social science with technology as a common
thread provokes new questions and explores new futures.
This event accelerates disruptive innovators in the research
space and pushes people to take risks, to think outside of traditional research
methods and explore new, alternative tools and technologies. You will see in
May that FOCI will bridge the gap for you between what people say they are
going to do and what they actually do.

For a look at what to expect at FOCI in a few weeks, watch
the short video below:

For more information
on the event, click here to download the interactive brochure: http://bit.ly/1poyewr
You get an exclusive
15% discount for being a valued reader of our blog. So use your special discount
code FOCI14BLOG when you register: http://bit.ly/1rfDFuV
See you in sunny California!

Speaker Spotlight: Magnus Lindkvist

I recently sat down with Future
of Consumer Intelligence 2014 
keynote speaker Magnus Lindkvist, Trendspotter
& Futurologist, who discussed how technology is not only changing how we do
things, but also how we understand the world, business, and people as well as the
emerging space of marketing science.
We are fortunate to have him share his critical insight with
our FOCI community. This year, FOCI
explores the emerging role of decision science and the convergence of knowledge
points – insights, foresights, social science, marketing science and
intelligence with technology as a central driving force and profound connector.
We are barraged by information – and within this sea of data
we must remember to think of the problem we are trying to solve and how we can
we use this convergence of information to better understand people.
 Translating the new “understanding” into future opportunities
means that the role of a researcher is changing. FOCI accelerates disruptive
innovators in the research space and pushes people to take risks, to think
outside of traditional research methods and insights gathering and explore new
and alternative tools and technologies. FOCI will bridge the gap between what
people say they are going to do and what they actually do.
Here is what Magnus had to say:
IIR: A big theme
of this year’s conference is ‘humanization of data.’ Why do you think
understanding PEOPLE (not consumers) presents an opportunity for strategic
action?
Magnus: Because
people have secrets and all opportunities begin as secrets.
IIR: How is
technology not only changing how we do things, but also how we understand the
world, business, and people?
Magnus: It
visualizes the fringes of society in a new way. Before, the mainstream was
dominant by its strength in numbers. But in the ‘thoughtsphere’, a Minnesota
flute tribe or Namibian upstart company can have the same perceived presence as
a king or queen.
IIR: How has
consumer intelligence strategy and action planning helped drive your business?
Magnus: It only
helped early on as I was learning the ropes. Once you grasp the basics, you are
free to challenge them known as “you-have-to-get-an-invite-to-change-music’-paradigm.
IIR: How has the
role of ‘the researcher’ changed?
Magnus: The title
has been completely eroded in that everyone points ‘research’ these days and
quotes some arcane, Googled study. But I see the role of the good researcher as
having been expanded and deepened in that everything from product innovations
to president reelections use research as their fuel.
IIR: Describe a
situation where you’ve taken a risk or thought outside the box of tradition
market research methods. How did that benefit your business?
Magnus: All
available research said the book business is a dying market. I wrote three books
anyway. They all failed.
IIR: Where do you
see the emerging space of marketing science and role of data scientists in the
next five years?
Magnus: I see a new role emerging called Chief Imagination
Officer or C.Im.O.
IIR: How has the
increasingly connected consumer affected market research?
Magnus: Negatively.
It dilutes opinions. It’s harder to find quirky, off-the-grid people who give
those valuable sideways kind of insights.

Want to hear more from Magnus in person? Join him
at Future of Consumer Intelligence 2014 in Los Angeles, CA in May. Magnus
will be presenting a keynote entitled, ‘When The Future Begins – A Guide to
Long-Term Thinking’ on Wednesday, May 21st at 12:00 pm. To learn
more about the event and register, click here: http://bit.ly/1lGi6Ur
** As a reader of our
blog, you get an exclusive 15% discount on your FOCI 2014 pass. Use code FOCI14BLOG when
you register **

About the Author:
Amanda Ciccatelli, Social Media Strategist of the Marketing Division at IIR USA, has a background in digital and
print journalism, covering a variety of topics in business strategy, marketing,
and technology. Amanda is the Editor at Large for several of IIR’s blogs
including Next Big DesignCustomers 1st, and ProjectWorld and World Congress for Business
Analysts
, and a regular contributor to Front End of Innovation and The Market Research Event,.
She previously worked at Technology Marketing Corporation as a Web Editor where
she covered breaking news and feature stories in the technology industry. She
can be reached at aciccatelli@iirusa.com. Follow her at @AmandaCicc.

Rats, Responders, or Consumers: What do we call these people?

As scientists and researchers, the lowly or lovely rat,
depending on your perspective, has allowed us to research many things over the
century. Rats have told us how live tissue responds to a variety of diseases
and drugs. Rats have also taught us about concepts like positive reinforcement,
punishment, socialization, team work, and much more. Rats have taught us so
much that for a long time, we used the same vernacular in our research with
human rats, or ‘subjects’ as we more kindly referred to them.
Over time, we realized that even that kind term wasn’t as
nice as what we’d been led to believe. The term ‘subjects’ still seemed to infer
that humans were disposable live samples to be treated and mistreated however
we desired. Clearly, treating our moms, granddads, and loved ones as subjects
didn’t feel right.
In recent years, we’ve worked hard to find words that more
aptly described what we perceived the relationship between research and human
subject to be. We sought words that focused more on the contributions our
humans made, on the respect and trust we have in them, on the effort and
passion they’ve gladly given us. We stumbled over words like responders,
participants, consumers, and people, each one of them lacking in various ways
to truly describe what really takes place.
But have we ever asked the human subject what they wanted to
be called? I hazard a guess that for most people, the answer is no! Recently, I
had the opportunity to do just that. I was able to simply ask a human subject
what they wish to be called. And the answer was surprisingly simple.
‘Call me your client.’ Full stop.
That never occurred to me before.
But really, when you think about it, aren’t people,
responders, participants, humans, consumers really our clients? We conduct all
this marketing research to provide better products and services for them. Which
means, of course, that they are our clients. How did it take me decades to get
to that answer? I really don’t know but at least now I have a good answer.

And on that note, perhaps I will pop into a #FOCI14 presentation by Kelley Peters, Neil Fleming, and Emily Stern of Post Foods when
they discuss how consumers are people too.
Annie Pettit, PhD is the Chief Research
Officer at Peanut Labs, a company specializing in self-serve panel sample. Annie is a methodologist focused on data quality, listening
research, and survey methods. She won Best Methodological Paper at Esomar 2013,
and the 2011 AMA David K. Hardin Award. Annie tweets at @LoveStats and can be reached at annie@peanutlabs.com.

Live from FOCI 13: Tap into Consumer Trends and Spur Innovation

Trendwatching. Done it for fashion and food, and now time to do it for the consumer landscape. Henry Mason gives an insightful slice of what the upcoming trends are and how brands can benefit from them. 

Macro trends – business and strategic
Consumer trends – what consumer desire
Industry trends – developments in product categories

Trendwatching can be used to better society and gratify consumers, as well as gain profits from consequentially satisfied consumers.Vision, new business concepts, new products or services or experiences, alongside marketing and advertising needs to all resonate with consumers to make them understand that you are living their trends.

Here are some key consumer trends:

Pretail
Is this the end of retail? Crowdfunding platforms are the new shopping malls. This flips the production process and raises opportunities for designers or startups.

Custowners
Consumers who move from passiely consuming to funding and investing in the brands they buy from. For example, give consumers interest in store credit, or investing in sustainable communities, with a consequential holiday reward (versus a no-return charity donation).


Again Made Here
Customize and readily made items in front of you. Consumers like to see sourcing that is local, even if it is manufactured on the spot, which lowers product turnaround and satisfies consumers with specific, tailored and niche products.

Safety Net
Consumers like to know they are safe. And technology can help this be more accessible to boost awareness.


Full Frontal
Most consumers need to understand exactly what you are doing as a company, and what social-environment targets you have. Consumers want to see the back-end factory works. To enhance loyalty, this is essential for guaranteeing consumer loyalty.


Demanding Brands
If consumers see brands as an ethic journey, brands are aware that they cannot do it themselves, and will need to earn the participation of the consumer. Think of Japanese restaurants who fine consumers for leaving food behind.

Consumer trends ultimately need to excite your consumers and be relevant to them. Reminds me of my article on a complex modern shopping trip.

Sourabh Sharma,
Communication & Social Media Research Expert at SKIM, an international
consultancy and marketing research agency, has a background in engineering,
marketing and finance from the University of Pennsylvania, and the Wharton
School and Rotterdam School of Management. Having worked in marketing and
product development at L’Oreal, followed by a stint in management consulting,
he now passionately enjoys the world of social media, and can be found on every
platform with his alias sssourabh. He is a food critic and a fashion writer,
and documents these alongside strategy on his blog called
3FS. He may be reached at
s.sharma@skimgroup.com. Follow him on
@sssourabh.

Live from FOCI 2013: Big Data: Powerful Predictions Through Data Analytics

Nate Silver, a world renowned statistician and founder of fivethiryeight.com, spoke of the world of errors and predictions, very relevant to the big data environment. He evoked the thought of what kind of predictions we can trust, and how much can we trust forecasters?

Judging from Hurrican eSandy or terror attacks or unforgiving hacked tweets and the widespread reach of all these, the topic is very relevant in a world where we want to know what happens before it happens, and wish to micromanage while it happens.

Nate’s 4 suggestions are as follows:

1. Think Probabalistically: convey uncertainty knowing what can go wrong. Only if you know what you do can you know what goes wrong.

2. Know Where You’re Coming From: Know that you have a point of view, it is helpful in identification and forecasting.

3. Survey the Data Landscape: What makes data rich? Quality, quantity and variety. Understanding if you’re in a data rich or data poor environment is critical.

4. Try and Err: Experiment with real data, test hypotheses, segment the big data, and converge to a great solution.

We live in a big data and uncertain world. Never has it been more obvious that we need analytics to navigate better.

Sourabh Sharma,
Communication & Social Media Research Expert at SKIM, an international
consultancy and marketing research agency, has a background in engineering,
marketing and finance from the University of Pennsylvania, and the Wharton
School and Rotterdam School of Management. Having worked in marketing and
product development at L’Oreal, followed by a stint in management consulting,
he now passionately enjoys the world of social media, and can be found on every
platform with his alias sssourabh. He is a food critic and a fashion writer,
and documents these alongside strategy on his blog called
3FS. He may be reached at
s.sharma@skimgroup.com. Follow him on
@sssourabh.

Live from FOCI 2013: Big Data & Attribution, from Fedex

2,500,000,000,000,000,000,000 bytes of data created every day. 
And are we still thinking of big data as a phenomenon?
Its a reality.

Its not just that the data is generated, its the rate at which it is generated. 90% of it has been generated in the last 2 years! Even though statistically less than 0.1% of it is useful, when you do understand and engage with the data, it adds tremendous value in fundamentally engaging with them differently. Or correctly.

Big data depends on analytics. That’s the only way to make sense of it, because data is all about the big 4 V’s.

Volume: There’s a lot of it.
Velocity: It travels fast. And is growing.
Variety: Unstructured, structured, and in various mediums – its all there.
Variability: And with variety comes the variability and usefulness of it.

The goal is to first start small: have questions you want to answer, and then get your analytics. This resonates well with social media research and related unstructured data that I’ve spoken about before too.

Ultimately, Ned Kumar from Fedex sums it up quite well, after startling statistics like 3000 transactions made per second (WOW!). “The issue isn’t information overload, its filter failure”.

Sourabh Sharma,
Communication & Social Media Research Expert at SKIM, an international
consultancy and marketing research agency, has a background in engineering,
marketing and finance from the University of Pennsylvania, and the Wharton
School and Rotterdam School of Management. Having worked in marketing and
product development at L’Oreal, followed by a stint in management consulting,
he now passionately enjoys the world of social media, and can be found on every
platform with his alias sssourabh. He is a food critic and a fashion writer,
and documents these alongside strategy on his blog called
3FS. He may be reached at
s.sharma@skimgroup.com. Follow him on
@sssourabh.