Tag Archives: flashback fridays

Flashback Friday: Measure Up Podcast Series

In a new addition to our Flashback Friday series we are highlighting content from the 2010 Measure Up event to gear up for Measure Up 2011. Measure Up 2011, June 6-8 in Boston, MA will focus on return on investment (ROI) as it relates to online activities; specifically, Social Media.

Looking back at Measure Up 2010, we revisit our Measure Up Speaker Spotlight:
A 3-Tiered Model for Measuring Social Media Success and How Social Media Saved Pitney Bowes $300K ‘ An Interview with Aneta Hall / Pitney Bowes-Part 2
This post is co-posted with StevenGroves.com.
In episode 1 of the interview with Aneta Hall / Emerging Media Manage at Pitney Bowes (PB) and a presenter at the 2010 MeasureUp Conference in Chicago in March, we talked about the need to develop a sustainable effort and a need to provide guidance to the staff that supports the interaction with customers, prospects and stakeholders.

In this episode, Aneta talks with Guy Powell and myself about how the elements of a relevant online strategy for PB includes traditional elements, like before social media came to onto the scene, but now it has changed many of the ways PB structures campaigns to their audience.

Play / Download Aneta Hall / Pitney Bowes Episode 2 Podcast Here
(Have you entered our trivia contest yet? It’s not too late to win a copy of ROI 0f Social Media. Click here for details.)

Flashback Friday: Measure Up Podcast Series

Flashback Friday: Measure Up Podcast Series
In a new addition to our Flashback Friday series we are highlighting content from the 2010 Measure Up event to gear up for Measure Up 2011. Measure Up 2011, June 6-8 in Boston, MA will focus on return on investment (ROI) as it relates to online activities; specifically, Social Media.

Looking back at Measure Up 2010, we revisit our Measure Up Speaker Spotlight: Alicia Rankin, Head of Research and Fan Insights, NFL.

Over the next few weeks, in preparation for the Measure Up Marketing conference we’ll be highlighting conversations focusing on marketing measurement best practices. Our first speaker is Alicia Rankin, Head of Research and Fan Insights, NFL.

Listen to the conversation:Discover Simple, Private Sharing at Drop.io

Download Alicia’s podcast here.
Download a transcript of the podcast here.

Interested in hearing more from quality speakers like this? Register for Measure Up 2011, June 6-8 2011 in Boston, MA here.

To stay up to date on Social ROI and marketing analytics news, follow Measure Up on Twitter at @MeasureUpIIR or connect on LinkedIn.

Flashback Friday: Measure Up Podcast Series

In a new addition to our Flashback Friday series we are highlighting content from the 2010 Measure Up event to gear up for Measure Up 2011. Measure Up 2011, June 6-8 in Boston, MA will focus on return on investment (ROI) as it relates to online activities; exclusively, Social Media.

Looking back at Measure Up 2010, we revisit our Measure Up Speaker Spotlight: Aneta Hall, Pitney Bowes

Over the next few weeks, in preparation for the Measure Up Marketing conference we’ll be highlighting conversations focusing on marketing measurement best practices. Our first speaker is Aneta Hall, Pitney Bowes.

Read Aneta’s Podcast Transcript here.

This blog post is co-posted with StevenGroves.com.
Social media in the enterprise is creating a huge shift in many companies, but what happens when a 90 year old company decides to invest in a process of listening to their customers and actually letting them talk to one another?
As part of the series around the ROI of Social Media, and leading up to the 2010 MeasureUp Conference in Chicago next month, we interview Aneta Hall, the Emerging Media Manager at Pitney Bowes. She is a presenter at the 2010 MeasureUp Conference in Chicago, where her topic is ‘From Fear to Trust ‘ Employee Engagement in Social Media’.
Aneta introduces us to the processes Pitney Bowes (PB), as a 90 year old company, has adopted using social media to connect with prospects, customers, employees and stakeholders around their mail and information needs. The changes have driven real change in the various business units, particularly as in the last 10 years they have acquired a variety of businesses. PB now provides a broad range of solutions to the market, not only in mail instruments and document management, but also location intelligence, traffic pattern analysis, predictive intelligence, and relationship marketing. Aneta shares how sees social media technology supporting the ability to tell the PB story to the market.
The role of the Emerging Media Manger at Pitney Bowes is to help the organization understand and constantly analyze the evolving landscape of social media. In her role, Aneta teaches other how to use the technology and she often presents the model outlined in Chris Brogans’ awesome book, ‘Trust Agents‘. She also maintains the strategic roadmap for PB and is often glued to the PB Radian6 console, because of the value she places on listening to the conversation in social media versus trying to use social media as just another channel to broadcast the same messages used in traditional media.
Pitney Bowes is using the information Aneta manages for several of their business units. As you might expect, some are more advanced than others in their use, but most are looking to up their social media investment in 2010 and take advantage of what social media can provide.
The major topic she finds herself discussing with business unit leaders is in the sustainability of the social media effort. Aneta sees covering this issue as a key component of her work and that means the units find they need to invest in training, guidelines, tools and tactics that support users, and providing a ‘loose governance’ structure that does not stifle the conversation between PB and it’s audience.

Interested in hearing more from quality speakers like this? Register for Measure Up 2011, June 6-8 2011 in Boston, MA here. To stay up to date on Social ROI and marketing analytics news, follow Measure Up on Twitter at @MeasureUpIIR or connect on LinkedIn.

Flashback Friday: Should We Listen?

Social Media and Community 2.0 Strategies is taking place April 4-6, 2011, in Boston, Massachusetts. Fridays leading up to the event, we’ll be recapping one of the sessions from the 2010 Social Media & Community 2.0 Strategies Event. For more information on this year’s event, download the brochure.

For our last Flashback Friday post before this year’s event we revisit: Should We Listen?

Though ‘listening’ was a key word in every session yesterday, Conference Chair Jaime Punishill, opened the conference this morning challenging that idea. See his thoughts on that below (with his other ruminations on yesterday’s sessions). Punishill also pointed out a cool tool, Twapper Keeper‘a site that archives tweets around a hashtag.

Punishill’s take aways from yesterday’s conference:

Experiment, learn, adapt
Most of the time, we don’t even know what you’re listening for in the beginning. And we don’t yet know how to interpret the information.

Leadership is clearly changing
We spent a long time listening to Charlene’s robust conversation about being open. Make sure you’re being open only to your industry. We’re naturally getting rid of pyramid system, and moving to a network model with cross-functional teams.

Metrics matter. A lot.
There are no right metrics, but they matter to your leaders.

Social Crosses the ‘T’
It allows us to be flat global connection, and also one of the greatest technological acceleration. It’s not an ‘either/ or’ but an ‘and.’

Social media must die
Social is an extension to our entire franchise, but with social services to it. It’s marketing, research, customer services, product development, etc. It’s both not different and totally different.

Looking back at the past year, what has changed? (Twapper Keeper, for one thing) have you developed or changed your listening strategy? Share with us below, or at the event next Monday!

Flashback Friday: How Open Do I Need to Be REALLY? Charlene Li Responds


Social Media and Community 2.0 Strategies is taking place April 4-6, 2011, in Boston, Massachusetts. Fridays leading up to the event, we’ll be recapping one of the sessions from the 2010 Social Media & Community 2.0 Strategies Event. For more information on this year’s event, download the brochure.

Flashback Friday: How Open Do I Need to Be REALLY? Charlene Li Responds

I’ve never heard Groundswell author and Altimeter Group founder Charlene Li speak before, and I’m glad I had the chance today. She makes “social” seem less scary; audience members that didn’t speak up before are comfortable asking her the questions that most bother them.

The points she made in sum:

- Focus on relationships. This is about having a relationships strategy, not a social media strategy.
- Align social strategy with strategic goals.
- Support your open leaders.
- Plan for failure – there will be many.

Relationships and planning in advance for failure are two themes that keep popping up this week, so it merits taking special note of those.

Here’s what Li discussed in more detail.

A recurring question she gets from companies: “How open do I need to be?” The answer: Have confidence and humility to relinquish the need for control, while inspiring commitment from people to accomplish goals. That’s how you stay in command without whipping out the iron fist.

A good rule of thumb if you still feel murky about this “being open” thing: Don’t just look at where people are being social; examine to what degree they are being open to one another.

This isn’t about complete balls-out openness; this is about cultivating the openness that is appropriate for your strategy. An example she gives is that she walked into a room full of people and bared her soul, it would probably make everyone uncomfortable, and she’d feel weird about it too. But if she’s walking into a roomful of her closest friends, it would be okay to do that, and people would get it.

Another nice example is considering Apple: people feel it’s incredibly closed, and in a lot of ways it is, but the fact is it would probably hurt more than help if they were more open. When will Apple need to be more open? When it stops designing exceptional products, Li says.

Seven guidelines for moving forward in your relationship strategy:

1. Align openness with strategic goals, say, for 2011. Pick one where “open” and “social” can have impact. Make sure the strategy aligns with one of the five-odd things your CEO truly cares about; if it doesn’t, you’re toast.

2. Understand value. “We tend to overvalue the things we can measure, and undervalue the things we cannot.” – John Hayes, CMO American Express. What’s the value of Coca-Cola’s five million fans, versus people that are exposed to a Coke ad?

3. Understand how open you need to be.

4. Find and develop open leaders inside your company. You may see four types: worried pessimists, transparent evangelists, cautious testers, realist optimists. Treat and use them accordingly. The higher up the organization you go, the more “worried skeptics” you find. By far, the most effective archetype is the “realist optimist” – they see the problems the company has, but understand the end point and have an idea how to get there.

Cultivate a culture of sharing inside your company, because it’s a safe place. If people can’t share inside, they won’t do it outside. “Mindsets only change if skills and behavior change,” says Li.

5. Prepare your organisation. What areas do your frontline people need to be ready for?

6. Organise to meet your goals. Try the social media triage:

7. Embrace failure. Wal-Mart underwent at least three major social media failures before it came up with the Check-Out Blog, which hit the right note: saving people money, no longer fabricating user conversation.

Four goals define your strategy:

Understand that the dialog is important, and you can’t get to the “support” and “innovate” parts of that graph without it. Learning to create a dialog teaches you what you need to do to support users; with that, over time, you can innovate.

Finally, manage risk with Sandbox Covenants: define the limits of your company’s “comfort” sandbox, so it’s clear to all participants. As your relationship strengthens with users, the sandbox will expand organically – yielding not just more openness and comfort with different technologies, but innovations, too.

Don’t forget users have sandboxes too; consider them. What do they expect from you? Create mitigation/contingency strategies for what happens when a line is crossed.

Li wrapped with a pretty idea: In the future, social networks will be like air. It’ll seem quaint that we had to go to a space like Twitter/Facebook in order to feel connected.

Photo via Logic + Emotion, who in turn found it on Waiting for Dorothy.

Looking back at the past year, has your company embraced openness as part of your social media strategy? What sorts of dialogs have you engaged in?

Flashback Friday: A Conversation with The Top Corporate Twitter Brands: How Can I Unlock the Business Value of Twitter to Innovate, Interact, Inform?

Social Media and Community 2.0 Strategies is taking place April 4-6, 2011, in Boston, Massachusetts. Fridays leading up to the event, we’ll be recapping one of the sessions from the 2010 Social Media & Community 2.0 Strategies Event. For more information on this year’s event, download the brochure.

A Look Back at SMC2010: A Conversation with The Top Corporate Twitter Brands: How Can I Unlock the Business Value of Twitter to Innovate, Interact, Inform?

Kellie Parker of Sega, Winnie Hsia of Whole Foods and Christi Day of Southwest Air are our panelists at this morning’s discussion on how businesses can utilize Twitter to market and to engage with their customers.

How did your brand get into Twitter?

Sega: Twitter was started at Sega about 2yrs ago. They made the decision to have an account for both USA and Europe; but they found that customers were following both Twitter streams so they combined them, providing messaging to all locations.

Whole Foods: Twitter was started at 2008 for the company and now they’ve provided 2/3 of their stores with their own Twitter. Shoppers want to connect with their store, Whole Foods is actively working for a 100% adoption of Twitter by all of their stores. There is a dedicated person at each store who controls the Twitter communication.

Southwest: Started slowly with Twitter then hit 7,000 new followers per day. Southwest now boasts 3M followers.

In order for the Twitter accounts to be successful, managers must listen and be human with the customers. The focus should never be a “hard sell” it should be a conversation, not a promotion. Finding out your brand advocates and the influentials and work with them, highlight them and make them part of your mission.

There is a customer service component to Twitter, and it helps your customers connect with a real person when they’re having difficulties; but what if customers are having a great time with your brand? Christi Day showcased an example for the “Nerd Bird,” a flight scheduled from California for Austin, TX for the South By Southwest conference that included a bunch of self-proclaimed “nerds” to the conference. Once Southwest’s Twitter team found out about this “Nerd Bird,” they were able to schedule a wi-fi plane for the crew – bonus!

What about promotions/coupons?

Sega does “Free Stuff Friday” which works like a radio call-in show, “I’ve got this t-shirt, the 10th person that DMs us gets it for free.” It’s worked so well that they’ve pre-announced the giveaways, blogged about the giveaways and now they’ve started to videotape the giveaways. It’s been a success and now it’s a great promotional tool for upcoming games.

Whole Foods does “Twitter Thursdays” and “Facebook Fridays” with giveaways that have included an all expense paid trip. When they give away really cool stuff, something more than gift cards, like a case of peanut butter – it’s a success. If people have something that they can really rally around, or they are a fan of something, it matters so much more.

Southwest Air source codes everything that comes from Twitter to the Southwest Air website. By only using their channels, Southwest Air had the largest increase in fare sales in 40 years just by using social media. Before the holidays, Southwest Air gave away 12 gift cards based on the 12 Days of Christmas, asking users to send pictures – the winners won a $1000 gift card for air travel.

Within your Twitter team, it’s important to have well-defined roles and a well-defined organizational system. Each member of the team should be able to fill in for one another, to keep the communication and the messaging consistent.

Looking back at the past year, have you incorporated promotions or give-aways into your corporate twitter presence? What other ideas for interaction have you come up with?

Flashback Friday: Key Take Aways from Community Pros Panel

Social Media and Community 2.0 Strategies is taking place April 4-6, 2011, in Boston, Massachusetts. Fridays leading up to the event, we’ll be recapping one of the sessions from the 2010 Social Media & Community 2.0 Strategies Event. For more information on this year’s event, download the brochure.

A Look Back at SMC2010: Monday, May 3, 2010, Key Take Aways from Community Pros Panel

The concluding session of the day at the Social Media & Community 2.0 Conference was a panel of seasoned community managers. The panel addressed questions ranging from stakeholder support to community culture and transparency to recruiting internal evangelists. Key points from the discussion:

  • When you launch a community, you’re saying, ‘We’re willing to listen … and listen in public.’
  • The biggest Do Not Do for a new online community is over promise what the community will provide or do.
  • A water cooler is often the number one entry point into a community’it goes a long way toward getting people on board. It’s opinion based (“I like this, I don’t like that”); it’s a safe start.
  • Determine who the fish are and who the sharks are and structure the community to protect the fish.
  • A lot of participation and community work doesn’t appear on the Web site; it’s behind the scenes.
  • There’s still nothing like getting on the phone or chatting face to face.

Looking forward to a great day tomorrow!

Looking back at the past year, did you incorporate this advice into your community management strategy? What advice would you share moving forward?

Flashback Friday: Which department should own social media?

Social Media and Community 2.0 Strategies is taking place April 4-6, 2011, in Boston, Massachusetts. Fridays leading up to the event, we’ll be recapping one of the sessions from the 2010 Social Media & Community 2.0 Strategies Event. For more information on this year’s event, download the brochure.

A Look Back at SMC2010: Which department should own social media?

Many presentations from Monday’s primer discussed the involvement of various departments in the launch of online communities.

The speakers were community managers who had the benefit of working across departments while staying faithful to the communities they served. They limit marketing messages, engage the proper resources when necessary, set up guidelines and manage the health of the community.

Companies instinctively think that marketing and communications should own social media, largely because it is seen as another channel to convey the marketing message.

However, I heard today that many believe that companies should limit marketing involvement in social media in order to foster the relationship without appearing disingenuous.

If you don’t have the resources for a community manager who do you think is best suited to own and cultivate the user relationship?

Looking back at the past year, has your company reevaluated what department social media should be controlled by? Is social media a branch of marketing in your company currently?

Flashback Friday: OMG! We Need to Do Social Media!

A Look Back at SMC2010: OMG! We Need to Do Social Media!

Social Media and Community 2.0 Strategies is taking place April 4-6, 2011, in Boston, Massachusetts. Fridays leading up to the event, we’ll be recapping one of the sessions from the 2010 Social Media & Community 2.0 Strategies Event. For more information on this year’s event, download the brochure.

Jaimee Clements, online production manager of eBusiness and AAA, gave a quick and candid half-hour talk on social media implementation. What she said is a primer for good execution; here it is.

Tips for If You Haven’t Dived In Yet

Start small. Try Twitter first; it’s easy to manage and understand.

Listen and take action on what users already want from you.

Be clear on objective and goals. If you know what your goal is, you have something to measure, and you can engage selectively, as opposed to in a way that spreads the net wide but wastes energy.

Meet with legal & HR early and often. Otherwise, if you surprise them all of a sudden with a crisis, they’ll probably take forever. Damage gets done when you can’t respond in real-time.

How dedicated do you want to be? A yardstick:

Low: minimal engagement.
Dedicated tools: Passive. Needs no monitoring once tool is provided to users. Structured user input, no content created.

Moderate: intermittent engagement.
Dedicated tools: Part-time. Weekly moderation, user submitted content/media must be reviewed before publishing.

High: daily engagement.
Dedicated resources: frequent posts, real-time responses, full-time community management.

Once You’re In: Objectives

  1. Listen daily
  2. Identify your top brand advocates
  3. Engage them where they are, and in their language. Don’t go storming into a chatroom at a socnet, where you haven’t introduced yourself, and be like, “I’m great! By AAA.” You’ll get spanked.
  4. Work the feedback loop. Make sure the data you glean goes back to your customer support team or whomever the most relevant department is. Don’t shove undistilled social media reports onto everybody; feed the feedback loop appropriately, so it can actually make a difference in your product line and the brand experience.
  5. Make it interactive; provide viral incentives. Bear in mind you can’t make a viral campaign; it involves a lot of luck, good planning and good community rapport.
  6. Prepare for the unexpected. If a firestorm happens, make sure there’s a real-time escalation pattern, with people already identified to manage it. (Handy Pulp Fiction reference: identify THE WOLF.) “Make sure you have that path identified [beforehand],” because whatever your response, you need to respond in real-time.
  7. Always be willing to adapt.

Best Practices

  • Be human, transparent
  • Be unique, interesting; add value.
  • Don’t try controlling the convo.
  • Be thankful! Recognize people helpin’ you out, say nice things.
  • Don’t be too salesy. It’s hard to be friends with that “always-on” personality.
  • Understand/define success metrics.
  • Don’t forget social media is public media
  • Don’t be afraid to have fun!

Useful Tools

  • Radian6, for tracking.
  • Spigit, for goal-based internal collaboration.
  • Yammer, which is essentially a Twitter just for members of your company. This is great for maintaining morale and keeping people feeling connected, however far-flung other team members may be.

And remember: To do the social media thing right, it takes a lot of time. You have to get to know your community to learn what to pull out, how best to talk to them. Don’t underestimate the amount of time developing that intuition will take.

Looking back, did you start a social media campaign or presence in 2010? Did you find these tips helpful?