Tag Archives: Fashion week

How Fashion Week utilizes Social Media

How do fashion brands use social media, especially in times like fashion week?


As evidenced in an aforementioned article, brands clamor on
twitter and Facebook to ensure that the wireless networks are abuzz with
their followers. Take Barbie’s QR code enabled scavenger hunt through Manhattan,
for a rewarding gratification of having the city at your touch phone
savvy fingertips. Digital marketing has shown to be the Launchpad when
targeting the yuppy iPhone and android tugging urbanite. View DKNY’s
inventive paper-clad e-vitation, as a blaring example of new times. DKNY
is one of many brands that successfully converted followers on social
platforms into shoppers. Including myself!

CFDA President Diane von Furstenberg deserves two thumbs up for
promoting twitter hash tag equivalents and beckoning New Yorkers to
indulge in the conversation, which allowed lucky winners to pick up a
fragrance sample two weeks in advance of an official brick and mortar
launch at Bloomingdales. Smart eh? And as a police check, there was a crosstab of twitter followings and updates with foursquare check-ins.

Forget
the bustling streets and lack of direction; iPhone apps like Lustr and
interactive maps (shareable on Twitter and Facebook ‘ stalker friendly
or friend-wowing?) all allowed tagging of partner stores as an entry to a fabulous giveaway.
It was not the retail brands that attach themselves to the digital
fiber optics ‘ from Bendel to Jimmy Choo, the upscale market sensed the
current of the circuit, too.

And the perks of simply fanning or following a brand on Facebook or
twitter? If Burberry, one was indeed lucky enough to get one of a
gazillion samples of Burberry’s Body scent, launched and sampled on Facebook
for its fans. Truly a far cry from makeup caked age-ing and harsh
pitched sales folks at department stores who jeered scented cards in
passerby faces. Oscar de la Renta raised its ‘likes’ by up to 40%
through a similar campaign, exhausting 25,000 samples in 3 days ‘ that’s
more than department stores nationwide can do for a single fragrance in
a month!

With so much interactive media space, I was envious of my
non-Manhattan friends who were enjoying the festivities, albeit in a
comforting environment. Livestream drew them to witnessing events in a
less sweaty party, all on the laptop. Fashion brand channels offered coverage
of their respective concerts, like Janelle Monae for Ralph Lauren or
Joss Stone at Nine West. Was the endurance really worth it? I should say
yes!

Coming to fashion week, I wondered the worth of standing at the back of a tent, compared to the minute by minute updates
of everything from the gleam of the stage to the wardrobe malfunction
of a model to the beat of the music, all of which was easily viewable on
one’s smartphone, and at a location of choice.

Note to voyeurs: indulge in livestreams.
Note to brands: livestreams can either build your brand equity, or drown it.

Sourabh Sharma,
Communication & Social Media Research Expert at SKIM, an international
consultancy and marketing research agency, has a background in engineering,
marketing and finance from the University of Pennsylvania, and the Wharton
School and Rotterdam School of Management. Having worked in marketing and
product development at L’Oreal, followed by a stint in management consulting,
he now passionately enjoys the world of social media, and can be found on every
platform with his alias sssourabh. He is a food critic and a fashion writer,
and documents these alongside strategy on his blog called
3FS. He may be reached at s.sharma@skimgroup.com.
Follow him on
@sssourabh.

Fashion Involves Marketing Research too!

Who thought marketing research could apply to fashion week?

As reinforced in my complete article on the topic, Fashion Weeks off late have astounded me with the level of
social media acceptance and usage that has been a catalyst in making
fashion so much more accessible. Retailers and designers alike have
truly harnessed this power to create nothing short of a racing
phenomenon.

Fashion
week shows today consist of a construction of minutely segmented
moments of a collection, a speech, a look, a sentiment, an accolade and
much more, all of which are instantaneously photographed, retweeted,
shared on a social media platform, and bulge up to relay a magnanimous
sense of real-time brand equity.

To think fashion week is classically an event for media and buyers,
who often forget that the ultimate wearer is the consumer. To that
benefit alone, social media can take credit for bringing fashion glitz
and glamour straight into the lap of its owner. The mainstream consumer
can now scratch the surface of fashion week, and even indulge into
wholesome bites of the world of haute.

And this has been more the case this year than any other. While fascinating to recap the measures taken by designers and
brands alike, my thoughts with the upcoming shopping season is this: how
much brand loyalty has it really created?

Fashion week is a glittering example of Anna Wintour and Diane von Furstenburg‘s
economics-class-driven idea to boost consumer spending by engaging
customer interaction with their favorite brands and brand endorsers,
namely drool-worthy and idolized celebrities who grace the streets in
the flesh to share the air with their fans. While shared across 700
countries, it is now an excuse to have a party, with stores carding at
entrances and serving cocktails and offering live performances amidst
littered clothing and accessories. From Armani Exchange’s tee
distressing bargains to Kenneth Cole’s personal kick off amidst
paraphernalia, brands lure and endure simultaneously.

In an upcoming post I’ll speak of specifically how social media and consumer behavior marry to fashion in order to bring truly research based insights into the world of haute.

Sourabh Sharma,
Communication & Social Media Research Expert at SKIM, an international
consultancy and marketing research agency, has a background in engineering,
marketing and finance from the University of Pennsylvania, and the Wharton
School and Rotterdam School of Management. Having worked in marketing and
product development at L’Oreal, followed by a stint in management consulting,
he now passionately enjoys the world of social media, and can be found on every
platform with his alias sssourabh. He is a food critic and a fashion writer,
and documents these alongside strategy on his blog called
3FS. He may be reached at s.sharma@skimgroup.com.
Follow him on
@sssourabh.

Deconstructing Anticipation via Social Media

With every social media platform exploding with either the
Oscars or Fashion Week or the Future of Consumer Intelligence (#FOCI13), the anticipation levels for events in general have heightened
to dizzying levels.  I am reminded that I
have to plan my watching and eating schedule for the aptly hashtagged
#OscarsParty, or plan my fashion week agenda by stalking #NYFW, and once again explore the
exponentially growing ways to market my presence at the events or on the net ‘
be it instagram, tumblr, twitter or downloading a momentary app.

Even Guy
Kawasaki shared an infographic on the Oscar winners based on social media
alone. The role of social media has evolved as an event enhancer and accessory
to a fundamental connection and sharepoint, making it the backbone of
existence.

My addiction to consumer behavior and personality deductions
from two by two matrices quickly ignited the anticipation framework that groups people between planners and
spontaneity seekers, and those who engage or observe in the activities they are
about to embrace. And thus, akin to classic marketing research, we have consumer segments based on their social media usage and consequential anticipation. It fits with any upcoming event really, since part of
marketing research is really understanding what drives consumers towards things,
isn’t it?
Some prefer to observe the events; discretely or directly
look, casually chat with others, snap a few photos, and continue in repeat
mode. If done with planning, these are theorists;
they will carve a niche with a well-defined blog or become journalistic fortune
tellers. The spontaneous folk can be
described as spectators, either following the crowd or simply observing what
comes their way, instead of finding it, thus creating a group that many newbies
fall into, including those that coincidentally feel the fever in the air.

People that like to engage in the events, who are bold enough to do more than
photos and shatter their muted expectations, they can either do so via planning
and fall into the enthusiast bucket,
or be bold and brilliant enough to spontaneously trudge through the live events
or be active on the social networks with vicarious pleasure, and fall into a
category I have occupied many times: the addict.

No matter what your goal, objective and personality is, social
media forms segments of consumers who you cannot ignore. And if you are even a
spectator or an attendee of anything from Fashion Weeks to the Oscars to
conferences like FOCI, you are likely
fall into one of the deconstructed quads. Right now, I am still unsure of where
I fall, but probably swaying between diametrically opposite ends of theorists
and addicts.
As I’ve stated before on my blog, ‘An intense anticipation
itself transforms possibility into reality; our desires being often but
precursors of the things which we are capable of performing.’

What tickles your
anticipation?


ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Sourabh
Sharma
, Communication & Social Media Research Expert at SKIM, an international
consultancy and marketing research agency, has a background in engineering,
marketing and finance from the University of Pennsylvania, and the Wharton
School and Rotterdam School of Management. Having worked in marketing and
product development at L’Oreal, followed by a stint in management consulting, he now passionately enjoys the world of social media, and can be found on every platform with his alias sssourabh. He is a food critic and a fashion writer, and documents these alongside strategy on his blog called 3FS. He may be reached at s.sharma@skimgroup.com.
Follow him on @sssourabh.

 

Staying in Fashion With Fans & Maximizing Mobile Investment

Wondering if mobile is the right avenue for building customer loyalty? It being Fashion Week, we thought it only appropriate to look to 5th Avenue, and TMMC-featured company Redken for some runway ready insights on this hot topic.

 Redken connects with both professional stylists and consumers via mobile. Their “Style Station” app, pictured here, helps out stylists with handy color timers (you can even set multiple alarms for multiple clients), new and featured hair color formulas, and access to a branded online community (“The Break Room”) where stylists can seek industry advice or network with peers. By providing relevant useful information in this format, Redken manages to bond with these busy beauty professionals.

The company also allows consumers to easily access information about their products with a mobile website. In this article from 2011, Nick Taylor, president of Usablenet, New York is quoted as saying:

‘In an effort to engage customers across multiple channels, Redken has optimized its full product catalog, a location-based salon-finder that allows consumers to find their closest Redken salon, and essential brand information that equips consumers with all the knowledge they need before they go to the salon.’

As we covered in previous posts, the keys here are a simple and clear user experience and providing the right information at the right time. Interested in hearing more about the ways that Redken is using mobile? Sarah Liang, Director of Interactive Marketing, Redken, L’Oreal USA will be presenting “L’Oreal Maximizes Mobile Investment to Increase Loyalty and Purchases” at The Mobile Marketing Conference 2011.

Learn about L’Oreal’s 3-tiered mobile program and how the brand used mobile technologies to increase loyalty with its consumers. Going beyond the loyalty-punch card, they engaged by integrating mobile apps into the lives of hairdressers, maintaining product users in the Path to Purchase loyalty loop.

To learn more, download the brochure. Save 15% when you register with code TMMC12DIGITAL here.

P.S. Join our social media community! Our new LinkedIn Group is a place to share expertise and brilliant ideas on anything mobile marketing and you can also follow us on Twitter or on Facebook for conference updates and industry insider news.

Michelle LeBlanc is a Social Media Strategist at IIR USA with a specialization in marketing. She may be reached at mleblanc@iirusa.com