Tag Archives: facebook

Is Amazon in the Room?

By: Laura Sigman

This post was
originally published on the LightSpeed Research blog.

On a recent
earnings call
, Sir Martin Sorrell, CEO of Lightspeed’s parent company WPP, talked
about what keeps him up at night. And no; it’s not (necessarily) his infant
daughter ‘ it’s Amazon.
‘And I would just mention the rise of Amazon, because in
answer to the question, my favorite question is what worries you when you go to
bed at night and when you wake up in the morning. It’s not a three-month-old
child (laughter), it’s Amazon, which is a child still, but not three months.
And Amazon’s penetration of most areas is frightening, if not terrifying to
some, and I think there is a battle brewing between Google and Amazon.’
The fear mostly seems to be of the unknown, as Amazon is
thought to be quietly
pursuing an advertising strategy
 carefully away from the watchful eyes
of Wall
Street
.
Is Amazon really committed? They are by pure virtue of their
strategically evolving business model. By being among the first big players on
the e-commerce scene, they cemented their early adapter consumers to them.
They’ve grown a multimedia offer around their core competency, and now Amazon
knows not only what we read, but what we search for, what we buy, what we
watch, what we listen to. I’m an Amazon Prime customer, and I take advantage of
all of the bells and whistles that come along with it. So they know what
content I’m engaging with, and whether I’m connecting to the content from my
PC, smartphone, tablet or Alexa. And they can leverage this vast supply of
shopper and behavioral data to sell hyper-targeted advertising to brands who
can then speak directly to me.
When you look at it like that, it’s really not much
different than how we’ve worked in the panel world. Historically, we have facilitated
the conversations brands have with consumers, and have evolved by taking
advantage of emerging technologies to help amplify those conversations. And,
like Amazon, we grew our business by embracing early on that panelists
(consumers) are people, too. 
(Believe it or not, it’s not as obvious to
everyone as that sounds!) Today’s consumers want to have meaningful
interactions, but they also want to have them when and where is convenient to
them. So we meet them on their devices of choice; we always design surveys
mobile-first (in fact, Lightspeed has an
entire team dedicated to this
) and we use
data appends
 to reach the right consumer with the right questions. We
invite survey respondents to answer open-ends with video
responses
 ‘ an engaging experience for them resulting in more
meaningful data for brands to act on. We’re able to blur the line between quant
and qual, intercepting surveys with invites to participate in deeper, on-point
conversations. And brands can leverage all of this to create hyper-targeted
advertising that speaks directly to their consumers. Which ties back to that
Amazon example I shared above.
As Kantar pointed out at their FragmentNation
event
, the marketplace is splintering — not with a whimper but with a
bang. So while the ad world should fear the Amazon in the room, it should also
embrace it. It’s an eye-opening reminder that consumers are advertising’s most
valuable assets in a marketplace that is more diverse and fragmented than ever.

Image Recognition and the Future of Digital Analytics

This post was originally
published
on Kelton Global’s Blog.

The days of text-centric social feeds are officially long
gone. A whopping 1.8 billion images are uploaded to the Internet daily
and of those, 350 million are shared on Facebook. Instagram recently
surpassed 500 million active users, and Snapchat now has more active users than Twitter. The content that flows
into our social feeds is more heavily optimized than ever to deliver more of
what people want’less text and more visuals.
Brands have adapted their social content strategies
accordingly by delivering more visually immersive experiences. And while we’re
seeing significant shifts in branded content, this influx of visual content has
yet to herald a commensurate change in social analytics. Accordingly, few gains
have been made to measure and derive insights from the contents of images or
video. Social listening has historically focused on the challenges of text-based
analysis’specifically, the challenge of determining the context and meaning
behind posts. But as social media habits evolve, it’s clear that deriving
insights from pictures is an increasingly important aspect of understanding
consumers. That’s where image recognition comes into play.
Brands have adapted
their social content strategies accordingly by delivering more visually
immersive experiences.

Simply put, image recognition is the process of translating
images to data. Photos and images can reveal a wealth of data
points’demographics, purchases, personalities, and behaviors (just to name a
few). Through next generation image recognition, a mere selfie may reveal a
person’s gender, approximate age, location disposition, and even the clothing
brands that the person is wearing. As text-centric media takes a backseat to
image and video, the opportunity to understand the contents of these formats
grows. These insights represent a veritable treasure trove of actionable data
for brands.
Tools that analyze image and video-based content are still
in development, but increased investment in research is already impacting
commercial products and how they’re advertised. One example is brand logo
recognition’scanning images for brand logos, and flagging them with the
corresponding brand names. This tool is especially powerful considering that 80% of photos shared online depict a brand logo but don’t
explicitly call out the brand’s name.
 This fact points to a sizable
opportunity for companies to measure and understand the impact of these formerly
inaccessible data points.
Photos and images can
reveal a wealth of data points’demographics, purchases, personalities, and
behaviors (just to name a few).

As an example of how this applies to brands, Kelton’s
Digital Analytics team took a look at the scores of backyard BBQ photos that
flooded public forums, blogs, and social feeds over the recent 4th of July
holiday. We experimented to see which of two quintessentially American beverage
brands’Coca-Cola and Budweiser’netted more published images of
patriotically-themed bottles and cans (as well as other forms of branding) on
social media.

In the end, Coca-Cola branding was twice as prominent as
Budweiser’s. We found that Coke bottles and cans popped up in more diverse
settings such as public parks and inside motor vehicles, whereas Budweiser was
predominantly found in bars and house parties. Coke also aroused greater
sentiment around the theme of Americana, as many consumers
photographed vintage Coca-Cola gear and opted for bottles over cans. This might
explain why Coke captured a significantly greater share of social mentions than
Budweiser.
This example illustrates several ways that brands can
leverage image recognition technology to build actionable insights:
??        
Ethnographic data ‘ Identify where, when
and how often brands are showing up in people’s lives.
??        
Updated brand health analysis ‘ We now have
a more comprehensive point of view of brands’ online footprint.
??        
Sponsorship and Branding ROI ‘ Extend the
value of branding and sponsorships shared via online news, blogs and social
media through a multiplier effect.
??        
Influencer identification ‘ Find authentic
brand advocates who consume and spotlight your merchandise.
??        
Misuse use of brand iconography ‘ Surface
content that depicts improper usage of brand’s logo or other creative assets.

In today’s ever-shifting social media landscape, it’s never
been more important for brands and their partners to stay aware of the new and
emerging capabilities that can help better understand consumers’ behavior
online. Image recognition is just the beginning. From AI startups to instant
objection recognition devices
, the mobilization and fusion of research,
tech, and capital is quickly reshaping the way we think about analytics. These
new tools will add even more contextual understanding to sentiment on social
platforms, empowering brands to understand consumers like never before.

Selling on Emotion: Why Show Ratings and Demographics No Longer Tell the Whole Story

By Jared Feldman, Founder & CEO of Canvs



An earlier version of this article appeared in AdAge.



With upfront season just around the corner, early signs are that brands, finally, are again buying more of what networks are selling.

That’s great news for the networks, after over three straight years of declines in upfront ad-time purchases (and two years of plateaued spending before that). But as the buying season kicks off, let me suggest that brands should pay attention to some new factors this year as they lock in deals.

In the past, in making decisions about where to spend their ad dollars, buyers had only ratings and some demographic data about existing shows, plus a first peek at new ones coming in the fall. What I’d like to propose is that buyers not use, or just use, those same old methods this time around.

Oh sure, keep the ratings and demos you’re used to working with. Nielsen’s work continues to have value and it’s evolving to embrace the new TV realities.

But show ratings and audience demographics by themselves no longer tell ad buyers everything they need to know in the new universe of “TV” we now live in. The TV audience is shifting, and in lots of directions at once. With it, the business is shifting, too.

Audiences are watching TV in more ways and on more platforms than ever, and at different times and in different settings. Just as importantly, audiences are talking about the shows they’re watching, on more social media and chat and other online platforms than ever.

And when fans are talking about these shows, sharing important moments, creating content about the shows, and reacting to that, they’re also evoking and expressing a whole raft of feelings and attachments about favorite programs.

The savviest programmers realize this. They’re building shows that connect with and captivate dedicated, niche audiences who care deeply about that show. They’re sharing compelling behind-the-scenes content, live tweeting with fans, and creating other experiences that will hook and engage the superfans who care most about a program.

And those shows and networks are exactly where advertisers should be. Those fans will be a show’s best ambassadors. And the research says they’ll also be the best ambassadors for brands advertising around that show.

The shows that stir emotional reactions are the ones that also will stir reactions and buying impulses for the ads of those shows. As they say in the business, that is gold. So it’s important to figure out which companies are doing a good job reaching and holding those audiences your brand cares about most.

For instance, the two networks whose shows most often evoke the emotion “addicting” on Twitter were MTV and Freeform (then known as ABC Family), according to a Canvs analysis of tweets captured by Nielsen.

It shouldn’t be a complete surprise — both networks target millennials, who are tech-savvy and sharing-mad. They share everything they care about, including some of their favorite shows on those two networks.

“Addictive” programming isn’t the only thing buyers should look for. For instance, what networks and shows do fans find consistently “funny?” A laughing fan is one predisposed to like the brands connected to those shows.

And though the industry may not be quite ready for it, let me propose another thing. Networks and show runners will become increasingly skilled at creating compelling niche programming for ardent superfan audiences. They’re also going to get better at using the new measures of success and building to it.

At some point, as creators improve, and as brands integrate what this means for their bottom line, we’ll have new network milestones for ad sales. Expect networks to begin guaranteeing more than just ratings.

Providing a minimum level of emotional reactions that can help drive advertising success will become important. And when a show doesn’t drive that emotional response, a network will have to figure out how to make good on its promise.

By that point, the entire industry will know how much emotion matters in making a show, and its advertising, succeed. And then we’ll really see the full power and value of advertising in the new TV universe.

Related articles

How Millennials Are Changing Their Relationship to Retail

This post was originally
published on Kelton
Global’s blog
.

Consumers of Generation X age and older grew up as
relatively passive shoppers, able to do little more than recommend a product to
a handful of friends, vent to a salesperson or write a letter to corporate
headquarters. But Millennials have a very different relationship with brands
and companies.

As mass-consumption natives, they see themselves as collaborators
and co-marketers instead of ‘the audience’ or ‘the target.’ They’re ready to
champion their favorite brands online ‘ and equally willing to criticize those
with subpar products or ethics. Digitally savvy and highly entrepreneurial, the
Millennial generation departs from the larger consumer base in a few key ways:
They want you to reflect their values.
According to a recent Pew Research study, fifty-five percent of
Millennials’ believe churches and other religious organizations have a positive
impact in the U.S. (Seventy-three percent thought so in 2010). Indeed, more
than one third of Millennials are
not affiliated with any faith
. So they look to brands instead to represent
their values, with around 81 percent of them expecting brands to be
responsible global citizens.  A 2016 Deloitte Millennial Survey revealed that 87
percent of this demographic don’t consider a company successful on financial
merit alone, but want evidence of corporate social responsibility as well.
Millennials are loyal
supporters 
of companies with strong reputations for CSR. Toms, which
sells shoes, sunglasses and apparel, has been a hit because of its
wide-reaching commitment to charitable causes via the One to One CampaignCuyana, which sells
high quality women’s basics and promotes a simpler lifestyle, is also popular
with Millennials. Through its ‘Lean Closet’ initiative, Cuyana offers consumers
the chance to donate clothes to women in need. Customers are offered a $10
credit towards their next purchase for every donation they make.
They crave simplicity.
According to Accenture, spending by Millennials will grow to $1.4
trillion annually by 2020. But their spending mentality is selective; they have
access to a vast range of goods but are highly conscious of the impact of their
consumption. The mindset has shifted from ‘one of everything’ to ‘only the
essentials’ ‘ and they want to know where those essentials were made, by whom
and with what materials.
They have higher expectations for customized, seamless
service.
Just as there has been a shift from material to experiential spending across
generations, the experiential part of the shopping experience has become
increasingly important for Millennials. Mens clothing retailer Bonobos, which
offers a personalized shopping experience in a showroom setting, has struck a
chord with a younger crowd turned off by the generic, impersonal process of
shopping at traditional brick and mortar retailers like the Gap.
They expect you to listen. And activate, quickly.
Millennials love to challenge brands’ and they know how to
do it well. They’ll keep up the pressure on a company until it amends a problem
in a tangible and authentic way. And if they’re frustrated by the slow pace of
change, they won’t hesitate to disrupt the status quo and start their own
company. Having grown up in the era of Shark Tank & Facebook millionaires,
they are natural entrepreneurs with the information, tools and confidence to do
so.
The attitude of the hip new health insurance company Oscar,
which aims to be transparent and unbureaucratic, sums up Millennial attitudes
perfectly. Its website states: ‘We wanted a better healthcare company. So we
built one.’
Brands take note: Millennials don’t want a story dictated to
them ‘ they want to be part of an evolving, authentic narrative that goes
beyond simple marketing and branding.

Image Recognition and the Future of Digital Analytics

This post was
originally published on the Kelton
Global Blog
.

The days of text-centric social feeds are officially long
gone. A whopping 1.8 billion images are uploaded to the Internet daily
and of those, 350 million are shared on Facebook. Instagram recently
surpassed 500 million active users, and Snapchat now has more active users than Twitter. The content that flows
into our social feeds is more heavily optimized than ever to deliver more of
what people want’less text and more visuals.
Brands have adapted their social content strategies
accordingly by delivering more visually immersive experiences. And while we’re
seeing significant shifts in branded content, this influx of visual content has
yet to herald a commensurate change in social analytics. Accordingly, few gains
have been made to measure and derive insights from the contents of images or
video. Social listening has historically focused on the challenges of
text-based analysis’specifically, the challenge of determining the context and
meaning behind posts. But as social media habits evolve, it’s clear that deriving
insights from pictures is an increasingly important aspect of understanding
consumers. That’s where image recognition comes into play.
Brands have adapted their social content strategies
accordingly by delivering more visually immersive experiences.
Simply put, image recognition is the process of translating
images to data. Photos and images can reveal a wealth of data
points’demographics, purchases, personalities, and behaviors (just to name a
few). Through next generation image recognition, a mere selfie may reveal a
person’s gender, approximate age, location disposition, and even the clothing
brands that the person is wearing. As text-centric media takes a backseat to
image and video, the opportunity to understand the contents of these formats
grows. These insights represent a veritable treasure trove of actionable data
for brands.
Tools that analyze image and video-based content are still
in development, but increased investment in research is already impacting
commercial products and how they’re advertised. One example is brand logo
recognition’scanning images for brand logos, and flagging them with the
corresponding brand names. This tool is especially powerful considering that 80% of photos shared online depict a brand logo but don’t
explicitly call out the brand’s name.
 This fact points to a sizable
opportunity for companies to measure and understand the impact of these
formerly inaccessible data points.
Photos and images can reveal a wealth of data
points’demographics, purchases, personalities, and behaviors (just to name a
few).
As an example of how this applies to brands, Kelton’s
Digital Analytics team took a look at the scores of backyard BBQ photos that
flooded public forums, blogs, and social feeds over the recent 4th of July
holiday. We experimented to see which of two quintessentially American beverage
brands’Coca-Cola and Budweiser’netted more published images of
patriotically-themed bottles and cans (as well as other forms of branding) on
social media.

In the end, Coca-Cola branding was twice as prominent as
Budweiser’s. We found that Coke bottles and cans popped up in more diverse
settings such as public parks and inside motor vehicles, whereas Budweiser was
predominantly found in bars and house parties. Coke also aroused greater
sentiment around the theme of Americana, as many consumers
photographed vintage Coca-Cola gear and opted for bottles over cans. This might
explain why Coke captured a significantly greater share of social mentions than
Budweiser.
This example illustrates several ways that brands can
leverage image recognition technology to build actionable insights:
??        
Ethnographic data ‘ Identify where, when
and how often brands are showing up in people’s lives.
??        
Updated brand health analysis ‘ We now have
a more comprehensive point of view of brands’ online footprint.
??        
Sponsorship and Branding ROI ‘ Extend the
value of branding and sponsorships shared via online news, blogs and social
media through a multiplier effect.
??        
Influencer identification ‘ Find authentic
brand advocates who consume and spotlight your merchandise.
??        
Misuse use of brand iconography ‘ Surface
content that depicts improper usage of brand’s logo or other creative assets.

In today’s ever-shifting social media landscape, it’s never
been more important for brands and their partners to stay aware of the new and
emerging capabilities that can help better understand consumers’ behavior
online. Image recognition is just the beginning. From AI startups to instant
objection recognition devices
, the mobilization and fusion of research,
tech, and capital is quickly reshaping the way we think about analytics. These
new tools will add even more contextual understanding to sentiment on social
platforms, empowering brands to understand consumers like never before.

7 Ways Technology is Changing the Way Consumers Behave In-Store

By: Phillip Adcock
The retail landscape is constantly changing and the only way that
stores can keep up is by constantly evolving. But how?
Modern day consumers use technology in a way that is
completely different to consumers earlier in the decade. These changes have
altered the way shoppers navigate stores and shop. So how should shops be
following these changes ‘ or even anticipating them?
 1) Shoppers Are Using
Their Phones to Research and Buy Products In-Store
You might think that a customer browsing in your store is
giving your products their full attention ‘ 
but you may be wrong. Many shoppers are combining trips to the store with trips online,
comparing and contrasting price and quality. While you can’t always compete
with online stores, it’s worth seeing which products are competing with yours.
2) Amazon Dash Has
Given Consumers the Ability to Buy with the Push of a Button. How Are You
Competing?
Amazon is trying to corner the market in next-day
consumables with its new Dash button. A Dash button
automatically orders a set product for next-day delivery when pressed, with
products ranging from toilet paper to lemonade.
Amazon knows that one of the key things retailers need to do
to compete in the current market is to make shopping as quick and easy as
possible ‘ and make the process so simple, a child could do it (which is
potentially why one of the Dash buttons available orders a round of Play-Doh).
3) Overseas Importers
Offer Prices That Are Nearly Impossible to Beat. So What Other Advantages Can
You Offer?
One of the main types of retailers you’ll find online in
stores such as eBay and Amazon are importers. Importing products from China
allows them to source vast quantities of a product extremely cheaply, allowing
them to sell at a very low price, with many items at 99p. How can you be
expected to compete with those prices?
Answer: you can’t. Rather than cutting your profit margins
to try and match importers, make sure your business outshines theirs in ways
they can’t hope to compete. Instead, provide services that they cannot, such as
fast delivery and great customer service.
4) Modern Shoppers
Want to Speak Directly to You as a Company. Are You Easy to Reach?
One of the ways you can offer the level of customer service
that modern customers expect is to communicate with them directly on the
platforms they use. Consumers now expect to be able to do everything online, so
to provide strong customer service, you need to make yourself available to
them. Facebook and Twitter make it easy to interact with your customers, but
beware: companies can easily fall into traps on social media.
5) Every Store Needs
to Have a Mobile and App Equivalent. How Functional Is Yours?
As customers have evolved to be fully phone-reliant, the
market for mobile apps and mobile sites has increased. These days, having a
website without a mobile equivalent is a foolish move and may lose you sales. A
mobile site should be as functional as your regular site and an app should
function on a similar level.
6) Virtual Reality Is
Growing in Popularity. Are You Ready to Make It Work for You?
IKEA recently launched a new Virtual
Reality feature
, allowing users of the HTC Vive to explore a kitchen
(and throw meatballs into open spaces). Although this particular application is
fairly low-function, virtual reality has revived and is well on its way to
being the big sales tool of 2017 and beyond. Do you have the ability to allow
your customers to use VR to interact with your store in a meaningful way?
Whether it’s navigating a virtual store or trying out new furniture in an
existing space, virtual reality is set to become a staple.
7) Free Delivery: A
New Standard
One thing that stores forget is that yesterday’s exception
becomes today’s norm and tomorrow’s rule. As consumers become more and more
used to convenience, what would have seemed exceptional when online shopping
began ‘ for example, free next-day shipping ‘ becomes expected. Shoppers will
now potentially abandon a sale because of a lack of next-day shipping and will
frequently choose a deal containing free shipping, even if it works out to be
more expensive.
It’s worth remembering that consumers love the word ‘free’.
Whether it’s ‘free shipping’ or ‘buy one get one free’, shoppers will always
gravitate towards those deals.
It’s hard sometimes to keep up with new retail developments.
If you’re concerned about being left behind, remember: what consumers want, and
have always wanted, are high-quality products for prices that are good value.
Although it is beneficial to follow the latest technological trends, providing
value for money is, and always will be, the best way to appeal to your
customers.
About the Author: Phillip
Adcock is the founder and Managing Director of the shopper research agency
Shopping Behaviour Xplained Ltd ‘ an organisation using consumer insight to
explain and predict
retail shopper
behaviour
. SBXL operates
in seventeen countries for hundreds of clients including Mars, Tesco and
B&Q.

Is it Worth it? Key Considerations for Social Media Research

By: Terry
Lawlor, EVP Product Management, Confirmit

The role of social media in delivering
business insights is a tricky business. While most researchers consider it to
offer real benefits, the big question is ‘how do we do it properly’? In our
recent survey of Market Research professionals, we asked respondents about
their feelings towards social media. Overwhelmingly, the most popular response
from the five choices offered was ‘A
useful addition to a Market Research project if we can bring the data together
effectively’.

The word to look at there is ‘if’.
For many businesses, that ‘if’ is
surmountable, and for others it isn’t ‘ at least not yet. There are a number of
things to bear in mind.
Who
is Your Audience?
The changing dynamic of the consumer has a
significant impact on research. Millennials behave differently when it comes to
researching, buying and complaining about products. The audience you’re
targeting has a huge role to play when it comes to establishing the part that
social media has to play in your business.
It
Takes More Than Technology
There’s no silver bullet for social media.
It takes a combination of people, process and technology to be successful. You
need technology to sift through the vast quantities of information ‘ to find
and filter data sources, provide intelligent sampling of massive amounts of
content, and perform categorization and sentiment analysis. However, you will
still need people. In our recent study, Political Buzz, we used social media
(as well as traditional surveys) to monitor topics for the UK election. One of
our key findings was that the role of people was critical in researching the
key social and online media channels, and in building the taxonomies on which
your technology must function.
It’s
More Than Just Social
When thinking about social media, most
people immediately think of Twitter and Facebook, Instagram and Tumblr, perhaps
YouTube and Pinterest. There are actually many more social media sites than you
think, and there are many different feeds within each social media platform.
And there is a huge array of online media, where people post comments and
stories, and review sites that cover many different categories of products and
services. So you need to think about online media as much as social media, and
you need to think about data sources that amount to tens or hundreds of
thousands of different media channels.
A
Double-Edged Sword
As with every ‘next big thing’, social
media research is a double-edged sword. On one hand, because it is largely
unsolicited, you can uncover insights that you never anticipated. However, also
because it is largely unsolicited, it might not address anything useful for
your research program. You may want to research a particular topic but no one
is discussing it, or your target audience just doesn’t use social media.

About
the Author: Terry Lawlor has the responsibility of all aspects of product
management, including strategy development, product definition, and product
representation in client and marketing activities. Terry is a seasoned and
highly professional enterprise software executive who possesses a wealth of
expertise in the Market Research and customer experience markets.

6 Tips Marketing Researchers Can Learn From Social Media

This post was
originally published on Lightspeed
GMI’s blog
.

Social media has caused a massive shift in the way people
communicate, interact and share experiences and personal interests. Consumers
are always on, always connected. Consumers build unique online relationships;
they are connected to brands, athletes, teams, family, friends and co-workers
on multiple channels. Sharing everything from political views to favorite
products, social media users are leaking valuable information and insights for
researchers to take advantage of.

Marketing researchers have adapted Mobile
First best practices
; but are we also looking to benefit from the same
openness and flexibility that social media platforms have to offer? There are
six ways to successfully engage and capture relevant and actionable
feedback from your panelists based on social media best practices:
1.      
Focus on
people, not metrics: Our
industry refers to panelists, not people. Are
we focusing on why individuals are dropping out of surveys? Are we worried
about their enjoyment of a survey or just survey completes? Create consumer
conversations, not metrics.  
2.      
Stay
authentic: 
According
to Digital Stats, 92% of consumers say they trust earned media like personal
recommendations above other forms of advertising.
 Authentic brands do
better on social media, but trust is earned over time. If you want to capture
genuine consumer insights, treat your online survey as you would a social media
account. Be honest and upfront about your intent.
3.      
Engage,
don’t push:
 Want to get better research? Consider the way you are
asking questions. Similiar to social media posts, consumers favor shorter,
visually appealing surveys with a strong narrative structure.Engage
your respondents first, ask questions later.
4.      
Let the
consumer decide:
video, text or photo? Social media platforms are
constantly evolving, but they always remain focused on consumer adoption. According
to Spinklr, marketers need to find new ways to capture the attention of the
consumer who has seen just about everything
. Every day, more and more
individuals are starting surveys on their mobile devices over PCs. They are
deciding when and what device to take the survey; why not let them decide on
the format? We design for cross-device research, so why not design
cross-format?
5.      
Be
relevant: 
Across Facebook, Twitter and Instagram, you want to reach
your target audience with relevant content ‘ photos, posts and videos. Like
social media, marketing research is a crowded space; panelists are flooded with
survey invites daily. Be relevant: ask
the right questions, in the right sequence to the right audience.
6.      
Interactions
first, technology second:
 Social media planning 101 = interactions
first, channel second. Allow your panelists, not technology, to drive the
future of the industry. Are marketing researchers allowing technology to
dictate the future or panelists? Are you focused on building mobile research
apps or consumer feedback apps?
Gaining success in social media isn’t easy; it’s a process,
a way of thinking. Social media can be used to create and collect customer
intelligence through listening techniques. And this can also ring true in the
online survey world. Think about it: Brands have the capacity to cultivate
conversations with consumers…but often don’t. Researchers who are successful
in gaining insights from surveys are the ones who allow the consumer to take
the wheel and drive how marketers can collect information from them. Platforms
such as Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Pinterest and Instagram allow users to be
creative and communicate in whatever method is enjoyable to them.  Why not
allow online panelists that same freedom? By allowing panelists to communicate
with you through mediums that are most enjoyable to them, through video for
example, you could garner more authentic and elaborate feedback. Rather than
force tedious or possibly challenging lengthy open text responses, try allowing
an option for using text or video responses. Instead of requiring respondents
to rate a product on a variety of features through a MaxDiff exercise, try
engaging them in conversation through communities or discussion boards.

The perfect solution for the survey world isn’t available in
140 characters or less, unfortunately. But the successes of social media are
ours to grow from.

Top 10 Trends Impacting the Future of Insights & Innovation

In the world of insights and innovation, trends are
impacting the way we understand our customers, cultivate relationships with
customers, improve products, create new products, and build business in a very
big way.
This year at KNect365′s Insights, Marketing and Innovation
Division, we have an amazing lineup of conferences that will help you inspire
new thinking and drive your business forward.
Here are the key trends we think you need to stay on top of:
Leadership
Conscious Leadership
John Mackey, Co-Founder and Co-CEO, Whole Foods Market,
Best-Selling Author, Conscious Capitalism:
Liberating the Heroic Spirit of Business
Find this session at
TMRE October 18-20: http://bit.ly/25cgoRY
Storytelling
Directing the Story (with a Little Help from Aladdin,
Fantasia, Pocahontas & Piglet)
Francis Glebas, Author: The Animators Eye and Directing the
Story, Director, Storyboard and Visual Development Artist, Disney, Dreamworks
Animation
Find this session at
TMRE October 18-20: http://bit.ly/25cgoRY
Millennials
Deciphering Generations X, Y and V: How to Understand Next
Generations and their Trends for guaranteed reach.
Jane Buckingham, Founder and CEO, Trendera, bestselling
author
Find this session at Marketing Analytics & Data Science
June 8-10: http://bit.ly/1ssK1gf
OmniChannel
Google’s Evolving Toolset for Omnichannel Measurement
Matt Seitz, Google
Find this session at OmniShopper July 11-13: http://bit.ly/1Xmsdiu
Technology
Technologies to Watch Out for and Their Impact
Gary Shapiro, Consumer Technology Association
Find this session at Foresight & Trends September 27-29:
http://bit.ly/1XmrMVw
Big Data
Big Data and Deep Analytics: The Industries of the Future
Alec Ross, New York Times Best-Selling Author, The
Industries of the Future, Former Senior Advisor for Technology and Innovation
at the State Department
Find this session at TMRE October 18-20: http://bit.ly/25cgoRY
Empathy
Evolving Celebrations ‘ Getting to the Heart of the Consumer
Carol Miller and Andrea Navratil, America Greetings
Find this session at Marketing Analytics & Data Science
June 8-10: http://bit.ly/1ssK1gf
Agile
How Logitech Gained Valuable Agile Shopper Insights
Betsy Aristud, Logitech
Find this session at OmniShopper July 11-13: http://bit.ly/1Xmsdiu
Culture
Conscious Leadership
John Mackey, Co-Founder and Co-CEO, Whole Foods Market,
Best-Selling Author, Conscious Capitalism: Liberating the Heroic Spirit of
Business
Find this session at
TMRE October 18-20: http://bit.ly/25cgoRY
Intrapreneurship
Entrepreneurship & the Future of Food
Manoj Fenelon,
PepsiCo
Find this session at Foresight & Trends September 27-29:
http://bit.ly/1XmrMVw
We hope you join us
at one of our conferences so you can activate these trends and drive your business
forward in the future!
Learn more about
Marketing Analytics & Data Science:
http://bit.ly/1ssK1gf Use code MADS16BL for $100 off the current
rate.

Learn more about Foresight & Trends:
http://bit.ly/1XmrMVw Use code FT16BL for $100 off the current
rate.
Learn more about
OmniShopper:
http://bit.ly/1Xmsdiu
Use code OMNI16BL for $100 off the current rate.
Learn more about The
Market Research Event (TMRE):
http://bit.ly/25cgoRY Use code TMRE16BL for $100 off the current
rate.
Cheers,

The Insights, Marketing, and Innovation Team at KNect365

Facebook Breaks Bad Marketing Habits with Data

Photo by Matthew Wiebe

“A point of view can be a dangerous luxury when substituted for insight and understanding.” - Marshall McLuhan, Canadian professor of English and philosopher of communication

Data brings important insights and understanding to the equation of opinion vs. reality. However, the availability of data is coming into question as many social media platforms are private. 


In “Is the Era of Social Media Analytics Coming to an End?,” Kalev Leetaru states that “In a world where social media means private conversations among friends rather than announcements to the world, there isn’t much data for outside social data miners to analyze.”

Learn how Facebook is deploying its state of the art measurement systems as Brian d’Alessandro, Lead Research Scientist, Marketing Science, Facebook, presents “Breaking Bad Habits with Data’” at the Marketing Analytics & Data Science Conference(MADS) on June 8-10 in San Francisco, California.


Register today for MADS to learn, network and share best practices with the most influential leaders in data science and analytics. Stay connected at #MADSCONF.

Session descriptions are from the Marketing Analytics & Data Science Conference brochure.

Peggy L. Bieniek, ABC is an Accredited Business Communicator specializing in corporate communication best practices. 

Connect with Peggy on LinkedInTwitterGoogle+, and on her website at www.starrybluebrilliance.com