Tag Archives: Emotion

Behavioral Science: Meeting In The Ladies Room

Why, asked Stephanie Magnan of Kimberly-Clark in her
enthralling TMRE Day 2 presentation, does behavioral science stop at the
restroom door?
From moving candy out of employees’ way to incorporating
play and stress reduction, modern workplaces use behavioral science in all
sorts of ways. The concept is simple: discreetly ‘nudge’ people into behavior that
does them good and makes them happy. Small changes in the environment can make
a huge difference in this, because they shift people’s emotional response. As
Magnan put it, ‘we think much less than we think we think’. Emotions are the
driver.
But very few behavioral science studies look at workplace
restrooms. And that’s a bizarre omission, given how critical they are to employee
wellbeing and the fact that, well, everybody uses them. At Kimberly-Clark,
Magnan’s team made a few small changes ‘ adding lotions and boxes of Kleenex to
the restrooms ‘ and were wowed by the results. Restroom satisfaction jumped
from 17% to 77%. People reported lower stress and greater wellbeing. And there
was a knock-on effect on perceptions of workplace cleanliness as a whole. The
real insight? All these changes were most pronounced (by orders of magnitude)
among women.

Behavioral makeover required.

Something about restrooms was critical to women’s experience
of the workplace. But what?
With the agency Brandtrust ‘ specialists in behavioral
science based projects, who use psychoanalytical techniques to probe emotions
in far-ranging 1-on-1 interviews ‘ Magnan and her team vowed to find out. 
Standard satisfaction surveys are of very limited use when
you’re looking at emotional response, because they tend to play back
post-rationalised reasons instead of getting to the guts of an experience.
Magnan described how Brandtrust and Kimberly-Clark instead wanted to ‘ask the
bigger question’ ‘ getting to the difficult, perhaps uncomfortable truths
lurking behind such dramatic shifts in opinion. Empathy, she pointed out,
precedes innovation ‘ to respond to someone’s needs to have to walk in their
shoes, not just listen to their voice.
So in this case the bigger question turned out to be ‘ what does it feel like to be a woman at
work?
By answering that question Magnan was able to get a fuller idea of
the unique role the restroom plays in women’s working lives.
The women she talked to described a ‘cycle of vulnerability
and confidence’ ‘ working lives made up of small victories and disappointments,
including dealing with levels of workplace discrimination. In an open office
environment, women feel all eyes are on them ‘ meaning they are always somewhat
alienated from their authentic self.
In this context the bathroom is a vital space ‘ a place you
have permission to be alone in, where you can sigh, relax, and refocus
yourself. While American restroom stalls are perhaps too bijou for it, in other countries women talked about praying or
practising yoga in the restroom. It is a sanctuary ‘ a safe space of utmost
privacy. No wonder small changes made such a huge difference. The restroom is a
space where women ‘prepare and repair identities’ in the gendered panopticon of
the modern office. But it’s also a space where they can connect ‘ hierarchy relaxing
side-by-side in front of the mirror.
Magnan used her insights to refashion a Staples restroom,
adding Kleenex boxes, flowers, full length mirrors (to check outfits properly)
and slates with inspirational quotes. The results were a huge success. As one
woman put it, ‘it reminds me so much of my restroom at home’. Exactly.
Magnan’s presentation is an example of the power of
behavioral science. Not just to transform experiences and emotions, but as a
way in to asking far bigger questions which can lead to deeper human truths
emerging. She left the audience with four take outs. First, empathy precedes
emotion ‘ only by empathising can we find insights. Second, risk asking the
better question ‘ go wider, deeper, less straightforward. Third, know your
mission ‘ remember the ultimate goal of your behavioral project. And finally,
find your passion within the mission ‘ Magnan’s obvious love of and belief in
her work shone through this presentation.

Day Two: OmniShopper threads and nuggets…

- Aaron Keller and Kitty Hart, Capsule

Future Hunters warmed up the Tuesday (slightly hungover) crowd rather nicely. It isn’t an easy task to deliver on the role of opening act, entertainer and experts in trend. The team of Erica and Jared did it again and certainly with a more cantankerous crowd than Monday as many cocktails were likely consumed just six hours earlier. Thank you for the caffeine for our brains to get us going.
The man, the Nobel prize winning author and the icon in behavioral economics was on the stage next. Daniel Kahneman, the author of Thinking, Fast and Slow sat for a discussion with Anthony Gell, author of The Book of Leadership. To start, let’s all acknowledge Mr. Gell’s exceptional job of interviewing such a brilliant mind without being tongue-tied. Now, to a hero of ours, Daniel gave us pages from his book but in his voice and while he didn’t translate for shopper marketing it was worth every word. Just listening to how Daniel’s mind works was insightful. If you need more on his models, the book is your best resource. It should be a required read for any research, finance or marketing department in any corporation. 
The next group on the stage was a panel of Sumaiya Balbale from Jet.com, John R. Whitaker from Lowe’s and Emily Shannon from Mall of America. Emily was a returning face to the big stage and she continued to deliver unique nuggets beyond her content from yesterday (also not easy). Sumaiya gave us a quantity of nuggets from the frugal next generation of shoppers who default to digital. John Whitaker balanced physical and digital with how relevant Lowe’s is within Pinterest while still being a retailer with designed moments in a physical space. 
The subject was the future of retail, which is facing some tremendous challenges with Alibaba, Amazon and others moving so much of buying online. And, with some countries in the world going from open markets to digital markets and skipping “the mall” economic phase entirely. Based on what we heard, retail has a vibrant future when it is properly blended between physical and digital. For some of you this is confirming, but for others it may be helpful to know retail has been around, will be around and the ability to understand what happens in the moment when people and brands intersect will always be important. 
Our sleepy session, Kirk Olson from Horizon Media surprised the crowd with so many morsels of intriguing content it formed a moment of people asking for his presentation. While it didn’t look interesting on face (printed) value, Kirk delivered a full meal deal (sorry, McDonalds) for this audience of curious minds. While we gathered some of the items in a Twitter feed under #OmniShopperEvent your best bet is downloading the pages of his presentation and carving it up yourself. It is well worth the space on your hard drive. 
Now, a bit on the conversations in-between. With some breaks, a lunch and other hallway conversations we discovered some of the larger threads of yarn from the morning. Here they are: 1. Cognitive Biases and how do we see beyond these to understand true human behavior; 2. The future of retail is bright and the design of moments is a big part of it; 3. The trends coming from wearables, getting back to authentic stories and vintage high-touch experiences. The morning had plenty of fuel for some empty brain tanks.
The afternoon slid a bit as the crowd may not have been into the conversations or perhaps we heard the term millennials just a few too many times. Whatever the case, the afternoon speakers had a larger uphill climb to get us back. Celeste Ireland spoke on telling stories with data and gave us a peak inside the culture of Maple Leaf Foods. From here we got a taste (actually no samples provided) of what Hershey is doing to break through some hard shell congestive biases in retail. While the lack of samples left this writer sorely disappointed, Kindle Partica delivered a concise and content rich speech with brain science, chocolate studies and a great case study with results. The lack of chocolate was overcome with great content. BTW, Welch’s provided samples in their presentation. Just saying…
Last, the bonus from the day came from the number of times our favorite behavioral economist and Nobel winner mentioned the word design. Daniel Kahneman is a big fan of the design world and repeatedly spoke to the importance of design with purpose. We haven’t met many economists and certainly few who talk about the importance of design. The birds sang and the words painted rainbows in our heads each time Daniel spoke (unprompted) on the subject of design. 
Hello world, we are a design firm and we’re here to help, reach out when you would like to talk. We’d love to hear more challenging problems to solve. It’s the stuff that keeps us energized. 
Now, let’s get some rest (in the form of a cold glass -or five- of Pinot Grigio) and we will see you back here tomorrow for day three. 
Aaron Keller, Principal
I am an author, strategist, researcher, cyclist, reader 
and consummate entrepreneur. When an interesting 
idea crosses my path, I find any way we can bring it 
to life. Earning an MBA from the Carlson School and 
numerous valuable credits at the school of hard knocks, 
I’ll sit at a boardroom conversation with anyone. 
Want to talk business strategy, consumer behavior 
and design? Oh, it’s on.
 

Kitty Hart, Director
@HartofCapsule
I am the HartofCapsule, caring for our clients, friends, 

colleagues and partners. When I’m not deep in strategy
and design thought, I dream of belting out Diana Krall 
tunes in the blue haze of a nightclub. Until that dream 
is realized, I help Capsule’s clients understand and rise 
above business challenges through designed conversations.

SaveSaveSaveSaveSaveSave

Day One: OmniShopper threads from the sessions…

- Aaron Keller and Kitty Hart, Capsule

The Future Hunter’s Erica Orange and Jared Weiner got us started with some opening remarks. The warm up was worthy and got us all pressing forward into a day of data, mobile, shopping experiences, authenticity and granule insights on human behaviors. 
Jessica from Saatchi & Saatchi X forced us into a conversation about emotion and the contrast with the big “asterisk” data conversation. She made a case for a complement with the rational data we use in the form of “gut” check and the importance of emotion. Jessica’s story of CoverGirl was certainly a good example, putting emotion on a pallet and selling it in Walmart. Yes, emotion on a pallet. 
Our next discussion was led by Todd Henry, the author of Louder Than Words. His story of asking people to walk along a plank of wood on the floor vs a plank 100 ft in the air and how the risk / reward equation changes helped clarify the risks we ask people to take when taking on new opportunities. But, Todd’s best story which came out of his more recent book, Die Empty, used a tree metaphor. The idea was presented by a DJ he met who talked about going out on a branch and Todd asking the snarky question, “what happens if you go too far out on the branch and it gives way?” The DJ had a brilliant response. The branch falls and starts to grow a new tree (fan base, participants and revenue are the tree). This is a natural metaphor for how innovation happens, by going far enough away from the tree trunk out on a branch. Nature is so beautiful. 
From here we digitally walked into one of the North America’s largest shopping centers, the Mall of America. Emily Shannon walked us through all the trials and tribulations of managing the digital strategy for a gargantuan mall. She had some amazing points and insights, but the threads pulled into the next discussions included the text response team (which we tested and tweeted the results), her perspective on beacon technology, augmented reality and the power of digital media blended with physical spaces for a “phygital” experience. Her example of the “Twizzard” was a brilliant example of a snowstorm of tweets inside the Mall of America. A blizzard without frostbite, but plenty of digital content to enjoy, finally chocolate has some competition for our attention. 
The next sessions were breakouts and the conversations in between. The ConAgra Foods conversation was around wearables and food brands. With a mere big toe dip into the possible data coming from mobile, Thatcher Schulte had the crowd looking on with open mouths and wide eyes. The term “big data” needs a rebrand to “huge effin gargantuan data” once you add in mobile and human data from all the human / technology interaction data points. Could someone get on that rebrand? Soon. 
The Red Bull presentation with InfoScout was a waterfall dive into what Red Bull knows and (strangely enough) doesn’t know about the crazy people who buy their drinks. It surprised us how much was unknown for such a dynamic brand like Red Bull. Yet, we shouldn’t be, the shopper insights world needs to be scaled to match the number of unique places you can shop. Red Bull is certainly bought in a large variety of venues and consumed in an even larger contrast of spaces and places. The point seemed to be, even with all the resources Red Bull has, it is still a constant and deliberate hunt to find more knowledge on the human being consuming your brand. 
Now to the conversations in between. We were pleasantly surprised by the number of tweets, instagram photos and updates in social media on the conference. We were equally pleased by how much attention our book, The Physics of Brand, is getting with this analytical crowd. The world of research is just as hungry for new thinking and content as our typical design world.
We are looking for research partners interested in participating in client engagements with our team around this new articulation of brand-thought in the book. Please reach out if you’d like to discuss this in more detail. 
Aaron Keller, Principal
I am an author, strategist, researcher, cyclist, reader 
and consummate entrepreneur. When an interesting 
idea crosses my path, I find any way we can bring it 
to life. Earning an MBA from the Carlson School and 
numerous valuable credits at the school of hard knocks, 
I’ll sit at a boardroom conversation with anyone. 
Want to talk business strategy, consumer behavior 
and design? Oh, it’s on.
 

Kitty Hart, Director
@HartofCapsule

I am the HartofCapsule, caring for our clients, friends, 
colleagues and partners. When I’m not deep in strategy
and design thought, I dream of belting out Diana Krall 
tunes in the blue haze of a nightclub. Until that dream 
is realized, I help Capsule’s clients understand and rise 
above business challenges through designed conversations.

Dad’s wallet is open. His heart and mind are too.

- Kitty Hart, Capsule

Jen Drolet and Julia Eisenberg from iModerate provided a deep-dive into understanding Dads of today and what motivates them.

A study was done with 2,500 dads with kids living at home. They were asked about what they put in their cart, what they see in retail, who is with them and how they felt. Interesting to see that statistics show dads are becoming the new “regular” shopper. In fact, 80% of millennial dads are becoming the primary shopper or at least equally sharing the responsibility.
Well, we always knew dad was a softy, but the research definitely put some insight behind this theory. 
Dad’s wallet is open as are his heart and mind. 
In a snapshot, the study shows dad is brand loyal, adventurous, convenience-driven, less phased by price and seeks information. While mom seeks value and deals, dad is actually less concerned with price. See, we’re not always the spenders.
The findings support the fact that he is primed for impulse purchases. So what circumstances lead to these purchases? What can retailers do to motivate dad? To answer these questions, research needed to uncover how dad feels.
Using the Luminoso text mining tool iModerate was able to dig into the language they use to describe their experiences.
Why do dads impulse buy?
They have cravings. They want to reward. Dads love convenience and they love to treat and/or indulge their loved ones as well as themselves. Dads are brand loyal so if they see a trusted brand come forward with something new, they are apt to try it. And, dad will impulse buy if he sees a good deal. 
We are all kids at heart. 
Part of the study included a look at how impulse purchases differ when dad is alone versus with kids. Well, well, well. Check this out. When dad is alone, he fills his cart with ice cream, chips, beef jerky, beer, tools and electronics. Wait, was the study done on adults or teenagers? 
When dad shopped with kids in tow, the impulse purchases included less beer, fewer tools, toys, DVDs, candy and games. Dad rocks!
Research showed that dads feel amazing, appreciated, proud and accomplished when they can treat or indulge their kids. But don’t worry, there is also some conflict here about spoiling or creating ungrateful kids. As with everything, it’s another example of a need for balance. 
One brand doing a great job in speaking directly to these dads of today is Cheerios and their recent #HowToDad by Cheerios campaign. 
If this spot doesn’t make you want to be a super-hero dad, there’s something wrong with you.
So, how can brands tap into dad’s open wallet?
Within the store environment, prompt dad in the following ways. Create opportunities to treat his family, to share experiences, to make memories. Helping dad reminisce about his childhood and helping him embrace his status as a parent are highly motivational. Dad wants to feel cool, successful and have great feelings about his kids in general. 
So dads, let go of the macho persona. We know you’re all just big teddy bears.

Kitty Hart

I am the HartofCapsule, caring for our clients, friends, colleagues and partners. When I’m not deep in strategy and design thought, I dream of belting out Diana Krall tunes in the blue haze of a nightclub. Until that dream is realized, I help Capsule’s clients understand and rise above business challenges through designed conversations.

Moving Beyond the Bullseye: Building a Powerhouse Home Brand within Target

-Kitty Hart, Capsule

Tisha Boarman, Group Manager Owned Brand Strategy from Target drew a crowd. Everybody loves Target insights, right? Right.

In 45 minutes we got the cool, inside story on how Target took a hard look at HOME, one of their original owned brands, and decided it was time to rebuild.

Target knew they needed engage in a more authentic way. Consumers are more connected today than ever so they knew they needed to leverage their brands as a connection to guests. With this in mind, they made a commitment to the philosophy of relationships first, transactions second.

Expect more, pay less.

But the question remained, how do we get our owned brands to stand on their own? And further, how can we get the owned brands to actually contribute to the master brand? Wouldn’t it be great if Target’s owned brands were actually trip drivers?

So, the new goals established included:

Move from “labels” to loved brands.


Engage the guest beyond the product.


Maximize owned brands for the future.

They went to work on HOME because this once flagship brand had been declining in sales. They needed to know why. A comprehensive process began with data mining. They also engaged Target loyalists and got them talking. Core Target team members collaborated in work sessions to generate ideation and then again, loyalists were engaged to provide feedback and insights. The major finding? The brand lacked a point of view. The brand no longer resonated with guests.

When Target spoke with guests during the exploratory research, they learned something very important. When the guest shopped, she wasn’t just thinking about products. She’s busy and wants her home to be a reflection of her. Her desire is to unlock the home’s potential. The HOME brand had not delivered on this.

The brand was rebuilt from the ground up. Brand position and framework informed name ideation generating 8,000 potential names. Once they landed on Threshold, the identity was designed along with a whole new product line.

Again, thinking about relationship first, transaction second, they saw great opportunities for launching the new brand. They now had an opportunity to bring guests and designers together. This was the birth of the Threshold Design Event in select markets.

While social media had done great things for bringing consumers closer to brands, this concept would take engagement to a whole new level. Guests came to Target with drawings, notes, photos, ideas and dreams. Designers conducted workshops first and then offered one-on-one sessions with designers to bring their visions to life.

Huge success. The Threshold brand is now aligned with the guest and delivering on established goals. But the effort doesn’t stop there. The questions now focus on scaling the effort and continuing to push the brand. This is just the beginning.

Tisha closed with one of her favorite quotes from Scott Bedbury. “A great brand is a story that is never completely told.”

We look forward to future chapters.

Kitty Hart

I am the HartofCapsule, caring for our clients, friends, colleagues and partners. When I’m not deep in strategy and design thought, I dream of belting out Diana Krall tunes in the blue haze of a nightclub. Until that dream is realized, I help Capsule’s clients understand and rise above business challenges through designed conversations.

Private Label brand quality : I’d serve that to company!

- Kitty Hart, Capsule

There is always place for conversation about private label brands, no matter the conference. This category continues to grow so it was great to hear from Peggy Davis today, a pioneer in the space.

Facilitated by my friend Chris Durham of My Private Brand, Peggy shared her experiences with the birth of private label and her career.

Have you been around long enough to remember this brand?

Back in the 1970s, Why Pay More? was Laneco’s entry into the private label brand business. Laneco was a grocery chain in eastern Pennsylvania and northern New Jersey. At the time Peggy was starting her career in grocery and was instrumental in helping Laneco explore this new path. Through trial and error, new product categories were explored and the concept stuck. Surprisingly though, back then, quality didn’t matter. It was all about price. Well, no wonder many private label brands have a bad reputation.

In 1985, Peggy made her way to Daymon Worldwide and Wegman’s, one of my favorite premium grocers on the east coast. Wegman’s had just started exploring private label, a big step in the premium space, and asked Peggy to lead the way. Creating some disruption, Peggy pushed the team into categories they hadn’t considered before. They went into the space of private brands conservatively but have embraced it fully. Continuing to focus on building the premium reputation of the Wegman’s brand, the product had to meet quality expectations if it was going to take shelf space inside this beloved retailer. Customers expected quality no matter the brand. This expectation was met and Peggy could confidently say that at no time would you hear any Wegman shopper say, “I wouldn’t serve that to company.” 30 years later, Wegman’s continues to embrace their private label family of brands and likely has one of the best selections in the country. 

Peggy has done great things as a pioneer in this space. And while she pleads for more women to enter this traditionally male dominated category, she is proud to be the only female inducted into the Private Label Hall of Fame. Peggy continues her career today as VP, Vegetable Business Unit and Industrial Sales for McCain Foods.

If you’re female and working in the grocery and/or private brand space, I encourage you to get involved with WISE – Women Impacting Storebrand Excellence. You can learn more here. Womeninstorebrands.com

Peggy, thanks for paving the way.

Kitty Hart

I am the HartofCapsule, caring for our clients, friends, colleagues and partners. When I’m not deep in strategy and design thought, I dream of belting out Diana Krall tunes in the blue haze of a nightclub. Until that dream is realized, I help Capsule’s clients understand and rise above business challenges through designed conversations.

Live from #TMRE14: Disrupt Habit

Award-winning New York Times reporter Charles Duhigg took us at TMRE 2014 today to the edge of scientific discoveries that explain why habits exist & how they can be changed.

About 45% of what we do daily is habit, according to a study done. Your brain almost goes to sleep when going through pattern behavior.

The Habit Loop:
Cue
Routine
Reward

Some habits seem to matter more than others – keystone habits.

These keystone habits actually affect other behaviors, people who work out regularly, influences people to eat healthier the day they exercise, procrastinate less, and use their credit card less.

P&G created a Febreeze Habit Loop by adding a pleasing scent to reward cleaners and integrate a sensory pleasure into the habit of cleaning up. Sales explode!

Lesson: Make sure the reward is actually rewarding, deeply and meaningfully to the person rather than abstractly.

Lesson: The most powerful rewards contain emotions.

The Latte Method involves:

‘We Listen to the customer, Acknowledge their complaint, Take action by solving the problem, Thank them, and then Explain why the problem occurred.” – Starbucks’ Employee Training System

How to seize and/or disrupt habit:

  • Know your keystone habits
  • Build in rewards with emotions

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

 

Valerie RussoFormerly a senior copy editor at Thomson Reuters, a research editor at AOL,  and a senior web publicist at Hachette Book GroupValerie M. Russo is editor at large of The Front End of Innovation BlogThe Market Research Event BlogThe World Future Trends Tumblr, the Digital Impact Blog, and also blogs at Literanista.net. She is the innovation lead and senior social media strategist for the Marketing and Business Strategy Division of the Institute for International Research, an Informa LLC., and her poetry was published in Regrets Only on sale at the MOMA Gift Shop. Her background is in Anthropology and English Literature. You can reach her at vrusso@iirusa.com or @Literanista.

Customer Experience Conversations: Crystal Collier

In this next post in our Customer Experience Conversations series, we sat down with Total Customer Experience Leaders Summit’s keynote speaker Crystal Collier, CEO of CX Act, formerly TARP Worldwide.
CX Act has pioneered the science of quantifying, managing and optimizing the customer experience and has remained a leader in the CX market since 1971. Today, through its innovative research, technology and customer interaction programs, it continues to set the standard to improve clients’ customer service performance, customer value and “The Profit of Interaction.’
In April, Collier and TCEL will explore these topics and the all of the new realities of building brands and relationships in today’s socially driven and data abundant world. The event will shine an important lens on the power of insights and the critical need for marketers to focus on factoring emotion into the bigger equation to get a return on customer relationships.
Here is what Collier had to say:
IIR: How is empathetic leadership changing leadership in customer experience today?
Collier: Without considering empathy’from the C-suite to the frontline employee’delivering a superior CX is nearly impossible. Customers are driven largely by emotions, and their behaviors result from feelings. If you don’t understand the emotions and leverage empathy to drive change throughout the organization, you are missing incredible opportunities to drive bottom-line results.
IIR: Why are empathy and emotion so important in when it comes to customer experience?
Collier: Emotions govern so many of the decisions we make, so CX must consider and accommodate that reality. Understanding the emotions associated with each customer touchpoint is critical’adding emotions to the customer journey mapping process is a great first step.
IIR: What are the key traits of a great customer experience leader?
Collier:  A great CX leader knows how to balance efficiency and effectiveness metrics for a complete measure of CX performance. A great CX leader knows that satisfaction is more than a score. A great CX leader taps into the voice of the employee as well as the voice of the customer. A great CX leader regularly, frequently, and passionately monitors and observes customer interactions. A great CX leader knows what touchpoints matter most to her customers and ensures they are best in class.
IIR: If your customers have a bad customer experience, how do you reconnect with them moving forward?
Collier:  One of the most important things to recovering from a bad experience is taking ownership. Ownership and accountability can set the stage for recovery. You need to own the issue with a genuine apology and deliver on promises to fix it. From there, putting measures in place to ensure it doesn’t happen again is key.
IIR: How has the digital revolution changed the overall customer experience?
Collier: The digital revolution has revolutionized access’access to customers, to data, to companies. Understanding what channels you control and where resources should be allocated is critical to an effective digital strategy.
IIR: Employee recognition can positively influence employee behaviors and cultivate a customer-centric culture. How do you recognize and motivate your employees?
Collier: Regular, timely, meaningful, and relevant employee R&R can help keep the focus on the CX; linking it to VOC metrics is also helpful.
IIR: How do you strategize and innovate on your company’s customer experience to continuously improve it as the marketplace grows increasingly competitive?
Collier:  You must understand what your customers want in 2 areas: 1- what do they need to make them totally satisfied and 2- how do you best deliver this service to them.
IIR: How do you make the connections between experience, brand and loyalty, which together create customer expectations?
Collier: The brand sets the standard for the experience and the experience drives loyalty. Delivering on the brand promise with employee behaviors is important exercises to increase loyalty and deliver a superior CX.
Want to hear more from Crystal on customer experience in person?  Join her at Total Customer Experience Leaders Summit 2014 in Miami in April where she will be presenting a keynote session entitled, ‘Bringing Empathy into Your Organization.’
Your experience at TCEL will include three full days of high-level visionary keynote presentations and in-depth case studies illustrating linking insights & data, data measuring & mapping, design thinking, synthesize intelligence from B2B and B2C companies across verticals, disciplines and cultures to march forward with a sound total customer experience plan.
To learn more about the event and register, click here:   http://bit.ly/1dQq6xh
About the Author: Amanda Ciccatelli, Social Media Strategist of the Marketing Division at IIR USA, has a background in digital and print journalism, covering a variety of topics in business strategy, marketing, and technology. Amanda is the Editor at Large for several of IIR’s blogs including Next Big DesignCustomers 1st, and ProjectWorld and World Congress for Business Analysts, and a regular contributor to Front End of Innovation and The Market Research Event,. She previously worked at Technology Marketing Corporation as a Web Editor where she covered breaking news and feature stories in the technology industry. She can be reached at aciccatelli@iirusa.

How to Create an Emotional Customer Experience

‘Let’s not forget that the little emotions are the great captains of our lives and we obey them without realizing it.’ ‘ Vincent Van Gogh, highly influential post-Impressionist artist

Great storytelling evokes emotion. Using the power of storytelling, you can create emotionally compelling videos with equally compelling messages that will continue to resonate with your employees and customers and build brand loyalty.
This video is one of the best examples of storytelling I’ve seen posted on www.publicwords.com. If the video doesn’t appear below, you can view it at http://youtu.be/7s22HX18wDY
 

This post also provides tips on how to recreate the same ‘magic’ for your videos.

Here are two articles from www.ragan.com to help get you started on creating videos to engage your employees, who are the ‘key to delivering your customer’s experience,’ according to Total Customer Experience Leaders Summit (TCEL) keynote speaker Peter Neill, Former Chief Customer Officer, Level 3 Communications:

Want to hear more from Peter on customer experience in person? Join him at Total Customer Experience Leaders Summit 2014 in Miami in April. To learn more about the event and register, go to www.iirusa.com/totalcustomer
Stay connected with TCEL:
  • twitter.com/TotalCustomer #TCEL14
  • linkedin.com/Total Customer Experience Leaders
  • facebook.com/TotalCustomer
Peggy L. Bieniek, ABC is an Accredited Business Communicator specializing in corporate communication best practices. Connect with Peggy on LinkedIn, Twitter, Google+, and on her website at www.starrybluebrilliance.com.

Your 2014 Customer Experience Strategy Checklist

Customer experience is a huge opportunity for growth today. Organizations who are doing it right are seeing profits soar above those who have not. The key is understanding how to align customer strategy against the other long range goals of driving loyalty alongside new business. 
How you get this done is what your peer groups will be discussing at the upcoming Total Customer Experience Leaders Summit.  This year, TCEL explores the new realities of building brands and relationships in today’s socially driven and data abundant world. Discover the emotional drivers that are critical in creating an effective customer story. TCEL shines an important lens on the power of insights and the critical need for marketers to focus on factoring emotion into the bigger equation to get a return on customer relationships. We cover it all at the Total Customer Experience Leaders Summit.
April 9-11, 2014
Trump International Beach Resort
Miami, Florida
Download the brochure for more information: http://bit.ly/1idxeUe

Here is Your Customer Experience Strategy Checklist: 

  • Build an Experience Management Core Competency, Experience Engineering Inc.
  • Be a Leader that Inspires Creativity and Innovation, Starwood Hotels and Resorts Worldwide
  • Change Behavior Towards the Customer Experience, Ferrazzi Greenlight
  • Use VOC to Take Actionable Insights, Asten Johnson
  • Master the Mindset of the Millennial Candidate, Career Builder
  • Use Emotional Energy To Make Your Customer Experience Programs Easier, Faster and Smarter, Brandtrust
  • Put Big Data to Good Use and Optimize The Customer Experience, TNS
  • Bring Empathy into Your Organization, Tarp Worldwide, Sensory Logic
  • Use Employee Recognition Programs to Energize and Strengthen Customer-Centric Organizations, Janet LeBlanc & Associates Inc.
  • Use Empathetic Marketing for Total Customer Experience, Insights Consulting Group
  • Move Brands Faster and Longer in the Social Media Era, Microsoft
  • Build Brand and Loyalty Through Customer Experience, Forrester
  • Incorporate the Rational and the Emotional into the Customer Experience Journey, Bank of Montreal

Visit our website to download the brochure and view the full program:  http://bit.ly/1idxeUe
As a member of our LinkedIn Group, we’d like to offer you a 15% off the standard registration rates, use code TCEL14LI to save. Register today: http://bit.ly/1f1zpvh
We look forward to seeing you in Miami!
Cheers,
The TCEL Team
#TCEL14