Tag Archives: Disney

Here Be (Inner) Dragons: The Art Of Storytelling

Day 3 at TMRE ended with a charming and funny keynote on
storytelling, by a man who’s lived and worked it for decades. Francis Glebas
has decades of experience at Disney and Dreamworks in their visual development and
storyboarding departments, and has written books about his work there (Directing The Story and The Animator’s Eye). 
90s kids in
particular would be impressed by his visual CV: helping nail the look of
Aladdin’s nemesis Jafar, and storyboarding the bittersweet parting scene in Pocahontas. Now Glebas storyboards Sofia The First, a show about a girl who
becomes a princess by accident. He shared stories from his career and spun them
into useful advice for research and marketing professionals looking to tell a
few tales of their own.
Presentations about storytelling tend to take two routes.
One is to focus on story archetypes
the basic concepts that sit behind almost all the stories we tell ‘ like ‘rags
to riches’ or ‘boy meets girl’. The other is to talk about story structure ‘ the shape of stories, and
the rise and fall of the protagonist’s fortunes. The two things cross over
somewhat ‘ ‘tragedy’ is both an archetype (a story with a sad ending) and a
particular kind of inversion of a typical story shape, as a protagonist rises
then falls, instead of the other way around.
Glebas had things to say about both topics. A storyboarder ‘
the person who draws out the way scripted action is going to look on screen, as
if it was a comic book ‘ has an enormous effect on how a story reaches its
audience. For instance, he worked on Pocahontas throughout its development ‘ he
was in the room when it was pitched, and he went on to storyboard the pivotal
scene where John Smith and Pocahontas must leave each other. 
This scene, and
the story as a whole, had been pitched as a Romeo And Juliet tragic love story,
but trying to draw it that way ended up flat. Then Glebas realised ‘ it’s not
tragic, it’s bittersweet. Not Romeo And Juliet, but Casablanca. He redrew the
storyboards to make the characters’ love more obvious and their agency more
apparent ‘ and it worked.
The lesson is that having ‘a story’ isn’t enough. You have to
be telling the right story, to get the emotional tone right and leave people
feeling happy. 
Glebas also talked about effective structure. His watchword
is the ‘four Ws’ which explain the arc of a great story. It all starts with a
WISH ‘ something the protagonist wants. But then they do something WRONG ‘
overreach themselves, make a mistake, find themselves up against too strong an
enemy. It’s then that things are at their WORST ‘ they have not only not got
their wish, but they’ve lost what they had. 
But, as Glebas put it, ‘when you
are in hell, you reorganise or die’. And the story takes a dramatic upswing
(like the neck of a fire-breathing dragon) into WONDER, where by making things
right again the protagonist gets more than they ever dreamed possible.
WISH-WRONG-WORST-WONDER. Glebas presented this structural guide
as part motivational lesson (‘find your inner dragon and ignite your fire!’)
and part pragmatic tip on how to structure stories when it’s your turn to tell
them. It was a warm, wise presentation. 
As with every storytelling guide the precise
set of archetypes and the exact ‘universal’ structure varies ‘ but once you’ve
seen a few that nets out as a feature, not a bug. Storytelling guides are like
diets ‘ it’s a case of finding the one that suits you, not hunting vainly for one
that never fails.

Digital Learning Options for the Market Research Professional Who Can’t Leave the Office

Is a 3-day event out of your budget? Or are you too busy
this month to leave the office for a conference?
We understand and want to help you become better at your job right from your
office chair.
Here are 4 pieces of digital content to help you accelerate
in your career:
The OmniShopper Digital Package
For the first time, you can reap the benefit of the
visionary knowledge shared at OmniShopper from your own office. Don’t let
geographic and budget limitations stand in your way, take the necessary steps
to ensure your future relevance by commercializing vision by purchasing the
OmniShopper Digital Package.
Buy the video package here: http://bit.ly/1Ltymo9
Webinar On New Ways CX Researchers Predict Customer
Behavior
In this webinar on October 8th at 1:00 PM EST,
John Georgesen, Ph.D. and Senior Director, Research Analytics and Decision
Sciences at Convergys Analytics., will discuss how three Fortune 100 companies
are tapping into new technologies and using linkage methodologies to uncover
customers’ needs, wants, and actual behaviors ‘ and turning those insights into
business cases for action.
Register for the webinar here: http://bit.ly/1fRmxL4
Podcast Interview with Target Head of Mutlicultural
Marketing
The Millennial consumer has four core needs and
expectations. Fail to meet every one and you risk losing him or her, according
to Michael Abata, multicultural marketing manager and consumer futurist at
Target. He shared some thoughts, tips and observations that researchers should
consider, notably around mobile.
Listen to or read the full interview here: http://bit.ly/1NR9dpg
We hope these digital learning options give you the tools
you need for success!
Interested in more of this content in person? Attend TMRE 2015 November 2-4 in Orlando, Florida.
TMRE if the number one insights event that gives you access to the most
insights professionals in in one place at one time.
As a valued member of our blog community, you get an
exclusive $100 off when you use code TMRE15BL at registration.  For more
information about the conference or to register, click here: http://bit.ly/1YOugfL
Cheers,
The IIR Market Research Events Team

@IIRUSA

Top 10 People Impacting Market Research Right Now

This year’s TMRE speakers making a huge impact on the state
of market research. With the right mix of inspiration, instigation, and
application, these industry leaders, movers, and shakers will bring you
unforgettable presentations this Fall.
 Here are the top 10 people impacting market research who
also happen to be speaking at TMRE:
1.      
Dan Ariely, Best-Selling Author of ‘Predictably
Irrational’, Behavioral Economist, and Professor at Duke University: Dan will
be presenting ‘Why We are Predictably Irrational.’
2.      
Seth Godin, Best-Selling Author and Disruptive
Marketing Guru: Seth will be presenting ‘Invisible or Remarkable’?
3.      
Hilary Mason, Founder and CEO, Fast Forward Labs
and Data Scientist in Residence, Accel Partners: Hilary will be presenting ‘How
Big Data is Changing the Way we Work, Live, and Dream.’
4.      
Jonah Berger, Best-Selling Author, Contagious:
Why Things Catch On: Jonah will be presenting ‘Contagious: How to Make
Products, Ideas, and Behaviors Catch On.’
5.      
Duane Varan: Chief Research Officer, ESPN Lab:
Duane will be presenting ‘Cultivating Ad Receptivity ‘ Strategies for
Countering Ad Avoidance.’
6.      
Caspar Barry, Risk Taking & Decision Making
Expert and Professional Poker Player: Caspar will be presenting ‘Risk Taking
and Decisions Making in Poker, Business, and Life.’
7.      
Kumar Mehta, Ph.D., CEO of Blueocean Market
Intelligence: Kumar will be presenting ‘Generating Insights in a
Hyper-Connected and Data-Driven World.’
8.      
Maxwell Luthy, co-author of ‘Trend-Driven Innovation’
and Director of Trends & Insights at Trendwatching: Maxwell will be
presenting ‘Thrive in the Expectation Economy: The Most Exciting and Urgent
Trends for 2016 and Beyond.’
9.      
Bill Hoffman, Chief Analytics Officer, US BANK,
Former SVP of Insights at Best Buy: Bill will be presenting ‘Shaping the
Future: A Moment of Truth for the Insights/MR Industry.’
10.  
David Krajicek, CEO,
Consumer Experiences Na at GfK: David will
be presenting ‘The Future of Insights.’
Don’t miss this amazing lineup and more at TMRE 2015
November 2-4 at Rosen Shingle Creek in Orlando, Florida. Learn more about the
event here: http://bit.ly/1MeLwXe
You get exclusive $100 off when you use code TMRE15LI to
register:
http://bit.ly/1KbemBb
We hope to see you in Orlando!
Cheers,
The TMRE Team
@TMRE
#TMRE15 

How to Create Game-Changing Market Differentiation

Photo: USS Enterprise, Rob Young from United Kingdom. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic license.’

“Get closer than ever to your customers. So close that you tell them what they need well before they realize it themselves.” – Steve Jobs, American entrepreneur

In “Across The Board, CMOs Struggling To Deliver An Integrated Customer Experience,”  Daniel Newman states that “only 13% of the 110 CMOs surveyed said they are able to truly deliver a personalized and engaging customer experience across channels.”

Are you facing the same challenge? Join Darryl Speach, Chief Customer Officer, Greystone & Co, Inc., as he presents “Designing a Customer Centric Culture: The Final Frontier for Game-Changing Market Differentiation” during the Total CX Leaders Conference June 3-4 in Miami, Fla.

During this session, you’ll learn valuable insights and the steps required to instill and sustain a successful customer-centric culture.

Prior to joining Greystone, Darryl was Disney’s lead consultant assigned to the Disney Institute/McKinsey & Company co-branded joint venture, specializing in customer experience transformations.

Total CX Leaders Conference will help you “learn how to listen to your customers, understand their differences and set the foundation to build a road map to create a seamless experience for modern customers.”

Join Darryl at Total CX Leaders Conference (TCXL) 2015 in Miami. Register today!

Stay connected with TCXL15:
- twitter.com/#TCXL15
- linkedin.com/Total Customer Experience Leaders
- facebook.com/Total Customer Experience Leaders

Peggy L. Bieniek, ABC is an Accredited Business Communicator specializing in corporate communication best practices. Connect with Peggy on LinkedIn, Twitter, Google+, and on her website at www.starrybluebrilliance.com.

Live from #TMRE13 Keynote: The Pragmatic Brain

Stereotyping is a natural human tendency. Brands are stereotypes. When you think of Disney, what comes to mind? Nike? BMW?

Brand stereotypes create reality. For example, Coors – cold activated cans, Rocky Mountains in the background, frosted bottles. You’ve seen all the commercials. They create the idea in your mind that Coors’ beer is actually colder and more refreshing than other brands. They are tapping into your unconscious and making you believe it.

Stereotypes resist change, but CAN change. In research studies, most people won’t change their minds, even after contact itself. Those ideas are so deeply embedded in their minds, that actual proof which negates it, doesn’t affect them. However, a few of those who came in contact, actually did change. In order to change your brand’s stereotype, you must first make small, significant changes to tap into your consumer’s unconscious.
The interactions must feel cooperative. If consumers feel you have the same ideals/goals they do, you will see positive change. For example – Guiness. Not a beer you normally associate with sports. If you saw a commercial of a bunch of guys sitting around watching sports, eating chips and drinking Guiness, nobody would believe it. In this commercial, they associate themselves with loyalty, friendship and having the same values you do, which sets the context for their desired change.

You must drive change with the right type of contact – it must feel authentic. Stereotypes are part of who we are. Find out how people see themselves and how they see your brand. You will then be able to align the two and position your brand the way YOU want people to see it. 
Bottom line for market research professionals. Think of your brand as a stereotype and strive to understand the full stereotype. Then you will be able to affect change.

Talia Short is Chief Wrangler at April Bell Research Group, a boutique, full-service marketing research firm, committed to delivering fresh insights you can act on! Learn more at aprilbellresearch.com.

NACCM Live: Disney Institute in Photos

Yesterday NACCM joined ProjectWorld?? & World Congress for Business Analysts?? for a joint session from The Disney Institute on “The ‘Magic’ Behind Great Teamwork: Disney’s Approach to People Management.”

In this session we discussed some of the ways that Disney provides great service by starting with dedicated cast members who feel like part of a team. Walt Disney created the structure of “first name basis business” – everyone in the organization is important. With some collaborative activities we got a taste of the Disney hiring experience.

View the slide show below for some pictures from the session:

Disney turns “likes” into purchases on Facebook

The venerable entertainment giant has lead the pack in it’s newest initiative to drive sales to the release of their upcoming film, Toy Story 3. The New York Times reports that the application, called Disney Tickets Together, could transform how Hollywood sells movie tickets by combining purchases with the powerful forces of social networking. When you buy a ticket through Disney’s application, for instance, it alerts your Facebook friends and prompts you to invite them to buy tickets of their own.

For now, only Toy Story 3 tickets are available. But Oliver Luckett, senior vice president and general manager of DigiSynd, a Disney subsidiary that manages the entertainment giant’s social networking presence said other Disney movies would follow if the application is deemed a success.

If the application is a success, will we see online movie ticket sellers like Fandango and MovieTickets.com adding more social features to compete?

Learn more: Disney Puts Tickets on a Facebook Site

NACCM 2009: Managing the Customer Service Experience

Customers today are more interested in the experience they have with you, your products and services than ever before. Making the customer experience your value proposition should be our goal according to Lewis (Lou) Carbone, founder and CEO of Experience Engineering and author of ‘Clued In, How to Keep Customers Coming Back Again and Again.‘ Carbone reminds us of a quote from Peter Drucker that brings light to this concept, ‘The purpose of a business is to create value for its customers and the reward for that is profit.’

Two companies, Disney and Howard Johnsons, have influenced his thinking about the customer experience. In working with Disney, he found that their management was concerned more about the customer experience, i.e., concerns over the melting rate of ice cream in their different theme parks, the scent of chocolate chip cookies to enhance the experience, down to the design of Main Street in a way that visitors perceived a long entrance that went on forever and perceived a quick exit after a long day at the park. Compare this to Howard Johnson’s model which lost its customer focus over the years.

According to Carbone, the economy has affected how we look at customer service today. One way a business can differentiate itself is through the service experience. Companies must move from a ‘make and sell’ product-based mentality to a ‘sense and respond’ experience-based mentality. The ‘sense and respond’ mentality focuses on what our customers really want from the service experience and examines the impact of cultural influences and psychological needs. When we factor these into the service experience, we can significantly improve customer loyalty and retention.

An experience audit can help us compare a current customer service experience with a desired customer experience. We can audit our current customer experience with a variety of tools including, language analysis, clue scanning, one-on-one customer interviews, etc. Clue scanning, for example, allows us to look for clues in a service experience that can be improved to better meet the needs and desires of the customer. By using these tools we can close the gap between the current and desired customer experience.

Carbone believes that improving the customer service experience involves both art and science in today’s world. ‘It is not enough to say ‘let’s treat them well,” says Carbone. We must look beyond that and decide what we want our customers to feel about themselves when they do business with us. Managing customer clues will become extremely important as time goes on. He foresees a day when every customer is treated as an individual unit as we perfect our ‘clue-consciousness.’ Until then, we must continue to keep our eyes focused on improving the service experience to remain competitive and successful.

Web Seminar: “Is LEADER spelled with an I?” Searching for Innovation in the World of Talent Development

Here’s a web seminar that is being put on by one of our sister events Innovation Immersion, that I thought our readers might be interested in.

About the webinar:
The success of leadership development, leadership transitions and leadership integration vary widely across industries, organizations and individuals. Why? In a recent research review, most executives expressed doubt that new leaders can step into new roles and deliver positive results. With all of the investments being made in talent management today, there are expectations that greater outcomes will be achieved. Please join Dr. David Yudis and explore some paths of possibility.

Featured Speaker
Dr. David Yudis, Director, Global Learning and Development, Disney

Date: Wednesday, July 22, 2009
Time: 2:00 PM – 3:00 PM EDT
Find out more and register here: https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/501492696
Use Priority Code: G1M118W1BLOG

NACCM 2008: Another Day


By Becky Carroll, Customers Rock!

At the NACCM Customers 1st Conference today, we had the opportunity to listen to some fabulous keynotes as well as start to dig-in to the sessions. Along the way, we may have even gotten a little Goofy! Lots of nuggets, video, and photos, including Keith Ferrazzi, Joe Torre, and Peter Guber. Keep reading! Inspiring Employees
The theme across all of the keynotes today was one of community, relationship building, and emotions. (Customers Rock! note – many of these themes work very well with the social media tools that are available to connect with customers, and with each other.) JoAnna Brandi kicked off the day with an energetic discussion of being leaders that inspire customers to be more engaged at work, which, in turn, leads to better customer engagement. As leaders, we need to use more positive emotion; this will affect our employees and our customers. Keep your employees out of the fear we are seeing, and start focusing on the positive. What is right? What is possible? What is the next solution we can find?
She also challenged attendees to stop focusing exclusively on customer satisfaction, as customers don’t want things that are just ‘satisfactory’. They want something better than that! While important, satisfaction is not the end game. The pot of gold at the other side of the rainbow is joy, happiness, Wow, and Magic. We have to start creating emotional relationships with our customers. This is done by showing up at work with emotion, not checking it at the door! It is the leader’s job to make sure everyone around them uses Magic ‘ Make a Great Impression on the Customer. Never Eat Alone The first keynote was Keith Ferrazzi, author of Never Eat Alone.He turned this into a working session to give people a personal relationship action plan for the upcoming year. Who do you need to work with to get you where you want to go? People are critical to your success, and relationships are the core. We discussed which words describe business relationships: Trust, human, feedback, fun, candor, collaborative. Which words add for most personal relationships? Laughter, love, listening, intimacy, reliable, trust, passion. The shift ‘ a business relationship is a personal relationship in a business environment. Make it purposeful; strategically guide your relationships. It is not about waiting for someone else to start the relationship; it is about you being proactive with others. If you have strong personal relationships, you will be more easily forgiven when you mess it up! Video of Keith: you can’t get there alone. Keith had the group go through a series of exercises to help crystallize thinking around this. Our job in this world is to create an environment around ourselves that invites people in to have a better relationship with us. It is all about what we do ‘ it is our responsibility. Lower our guard, invite people in. As we talk to people, we ought to be having the following internal conversation: – Is there something I can care about with this person? A way to connect and remember?
- Is there a way I can help? ‘How can I help you? Who can I introduce you to’? How powerful is that?! Keith also discussed the ‘Fluffy’ factor. This was referring to a phone conversation where the service rep could hear a dog barking in the background ‘ ‘Fluffy’. “What is the name of your dog,” this rep might ask, as a way to connect with the other person and see them as a human being (not just an irritating caller). We need to show up as the human and empathetic individual they want to see. If all call center folks projected a wonderful positive outcome, in their own minds, it would begin to manifest itself. How are your customer service people seeing your customers? As a pain, or as a real person with real issues? Keith also shared about the importance of being real, authentic, and human to others. He stated that others can tell right away if we are not being truthful or transparent with them, even over the phone! We need to have the following mindset, with customers or with those we want to build relationships with: We really care. We want to hear you (people need to be heard). When we have this mindset, we begin to empathize. I will wrap up this section on Keith with a video of him telling the story about someone who cared about another human being and how it changed lives. We then had the pleasure of listening to Joe Torre, manager of the LA Dodgers, share nuggets from his many years in baseball. Here are some highlights:

  • You only get better (at whatever you do) when you have to deal with setbacks. Tough times don’t last; tough people do.
  • It’s the little things in a game that help you win. Concentrate on the little things; big things will happen.
  • Be loyal to each other on the team, and have respect for that other guy who is out there, perhaps where you want to be.
  • You can’t assume your customers are yours forever.
  • What can I help us do to win today?
  • Whatever line of work you are in, it is all about the people.

Making Connections Through Storytelling The morning ended with a fascinating speech by Peter Guber, Chairman and Founder, Mandalay Entertainment. Peter has quite a line of Hollywood successes, including his role as producer for such films as Gorillas in the Mist, The Deep, The Color Purple, and Rain Man, to name a few.
Per Peter: “Coping with failure in uncertain times is a necessity; it has always been a partner in my journey.” He shared three navigational states for these times and how to get through them – fear, uncertainty, and change. Peter also shared that the game changer, the secret sauce, is the story we tell ourselves and the story we tell our customers and clients. Oral storytelling. It is in all of us. We need to connect our story to the emotions of our customers and employees to help them propel themselves through all of this. We are all wired to do oral storytelling. When we do it, it changes the word from “customer/client/patron” to “audience”. One thing to keep in mind about an audience: they expect experiences and to be engaged emotionally. They want to be moved. Here is a video of Peter talking about how human beings are “wired” to tell oral stories. Peter encouraged us to unleash our story for our benefit, and do it by MAGIC. MAGIC ‘ like a hand, each of the following concepts works independently, but they work better together. Motivating your Audience to your Goal Interactively with great Content Are you motivated about your story? Yes ‘ you can craft a powerful story. You can tell, before someone says a word, whether they are authentic. Be calm; be coherent with it. Then tell it. Demonstrate you are authentic with your story. This engages people. Audience ‘ everybody you talk with (not to) is an audience. How do I get their attention? If it’s not a good time to do it, don’t tell your story! Know what is interesting. Try to be interested in them, create an emotional connection. The context makes the story different for everyone. What are they interested in? Find out then connect it to that. Aim for the heart, not the head. Feelings. Often times a story, elegantly presented, can change the results. Here is another video of Peter discussing how he convinced the head of the studio to let him make the film Gorillas in the Mist. In this video, Peter was just talking about how he had come to realize that he was not connecting with his audience (the studio head). So, he became a wounded gorilla in order to help explain why it was important to tell the story of saving gorillas: Goal ‘ specifically direct someone to a call to action. We have to have authentic goals that are generous; then, we both win. Virally-advocated stories are authentic; they have to be real. Interactively ‘ it has to be a conversation. The more senses you engage in your story, the more likely you are to own it. They feel they are participating in the story ‘ let your audience own it so they can tell it for you. It’s the way we are wired. Interactivity ‘ think about it before you start. You have to surrender control. Why do you think you control the customer or your brand? When you relinquish control, it allows them to come forward and own the information in a unique way. Content ‘ The actual story is the Holy Grail. Look to your own experience ‘ true story, inspired by story. Use observation ‘ retell other people’s stories. Use them for emotional transportation. Look at history and use artifacts; make emotional connections today from it. Use metaphor and analogy; he became a gorilla for the studio head to get him to connect with the story and make the movie. Think of your customers as an audience, interact with them with really great content, and enjoy the front row seat to your success. Other Goodies The afternoon consisted of 4 main tracks of sessions. I attended the session on Disney presented by Maritz and The Disney Institute. Bruce Kimbrell was again the presenter, along with Kathy Oughton from Maritz. Bruce told a great story about how serious Disney is about surveying customers in the theme park. He shared that some days, the survey at the entrance gate to the park might only ask for your zip code. On other days, the conversation might go like this: Disney: “Hi, do you have a some time to take our guest survey? We would need about 2 hours of your time.” Guest: “Uh, no, that would take up a big chunk of my time here.” Disney: “Well, how about if we take care of you for tomorrow?” Guest: “No, I would have to change my flights, my hotel…” Disney: “What if we took care of that? Would you be willing to give us your time?” Now that is serious focus on getting the voice of the customer! I also had the opportunity to sit in on JoAnna Brandi‘s session/discussion about what makes people feel good at work. Here were some of the attendee responses – - Liking the people I work with – Harmony – Making a difference – Being recognized by others, especially when you find out about it later JoAnna is trying to understand these motivators so she can help coach others on how to improve employee retention and loyalty. There’s More! Go check out my blog, the flickr group, and my Tweets to see/hear more about the day. Last day – tomorrow!