Tag Archives: Dion Hinchcliffe

Social networking and business objectives

Dion Hinchcliffe recently looked at the how online communities are revolutionizing many businesses. Millions of individuals have joined online communities with in the past few years. Hinchcliffe looks at the difference between the growing contrast between business communities and consumer communities. While many business communities have not faired as well as consumer communities, some businesses have found the perfect way to strike the balance.

He recognizes a running theme in all of the communities that work:
[Successful communities are] Attracting like-minded people highly interested and engaged in what they do.

Read the full article here.

Platforms for Creation of Online Communities

This article from ZDNet is an analysis of Dion Hinchcliffe’s point of view on regarding the ‘Ten leading platforms for creating online communities’. As he mentions, online communities no longer are thought of as simple tools for fun, they are now being viewed more as opportunities, and ways of ‘getting things done’. Without much further ado here are the top ten platforms that Hinchcliffe recommends:

1.Joomla
2. Drupal
3. PHP-Nuke
4. zikula
5. Share-Point Community Portal
6. Lithium
7. dotnetnuke
8. Community Server
9. Kickapps
10. ClearSpace Community

Let me know if there are any others that you feel have been left off the list!

Online Customer Communities Tips

Web 2.0 is one of the latest trends in business and is changing the way companies, and consumers are interacting with one another. Rules that many thought set in stone have become unraveled and it is important for organizations to keep up with the changing times. It is especially important for organizations to understand the nature of online customer communities and how it affects the company and client relationship. This blog post from ZDNet highlights some of the best practices for online customer communities.

  1. Put the needs of the community first
  2. Community is mostly not a technology problem
  3. Active community management
  4. Measuring success with community requires new yardsticks
  5. Consumer social networks, grassroots customer communities, and business-initiated customer communities are closely related yet very different creatures
  6. Customer communities do work as a marketing channel, just not in the traditional way
  7. The more that business is integrated, the better the community will work
  8. Growth will come, but not until a community finds its identity
  9. Mutual ownership and control of communities enables trust and involvement
  10. Most communities are highly social entities, and the rules of social engagement apply
  11. Going to the community, instead of making it come to you, is a risky but increasingly viable strategy
  12. Connect the community with other CRM-related aspects of the organization

Are there any other points that you would highlight? Has your organization been implementing these tips?