Tag Archives: demographics

Diverse Demographics: Breaking Stereotypes

Millennials are the most diverse generation
in history ‘ only 59% are Caucasian and 27% have an immigrant background (Deloitte, 2015). Therefore, it’s no surprise that this
demographic expects brands to embrace and reflect the diversity of their lives
‘ a trend previously highlighted by Stylus Life in our report No
normal: Post-diversity marketing
. If brands are to do this successfully, they
must move beyond crude stereotyping to represent a broad spectrum of race,
gender and sexuality.
For instance, Muslim millennials offer
growing opportunities for brands
‘ the Muslim consumer lifestyle market is
predicted to reach $2.6tn by 2020. The modern yet faith-driven outlook of this
group, along with a growing disposable income, will see them buy into brands
that reflect or understand their values. Make-up brand CoverGirl is already
tapping into this lucrative demographic with its latest brand ambassador ‘beauty
blogger and hijab wearer Nura Afia
. One of a growing number of Muslim
beauty bloggers, her new role demonstrates the importance and appeal of diverse
representation.

Beauty brands are working particularly hard
to cater to often forgotten demographics. A new initiative from L’Oreal
offers free step-by-step audio tutorials
to give visually impaired women
more independence. The usability has been carefully considered to fit the needs
of this consumer group ‘ the cosmetic and skincare tutorials are concise to fit
into everyday habits, while the app’s customisable user interface features a
monochrome palette and large text.
Also targeting a currently under-catered
market, UnBeweavable
Hair
is an on-demand hair service specifically for women of colour.
On-demand beauty services, which provide a stylist straight to your home or
workplace, have been rising in popularity for some time now ‘ yet UnBeweavable
Hair is the first tailored to the specific needs of this demographic.

Created by Zina Alfa, it was inspired by her own difficulties in finding
hairdressers who understood her needs. Made by a woman of colour for other
women of colour, this case study shows that if brands want to provide products and
services that appeal to all, they must improve the diversity of their
workforce.

Rebecca Minkoff recently highlighted the
need for diverse workforces, citing the lack
of female employees in technology companies
(and STEM fields in general) as
a key reason why wearables are not currently capturing female consumers. The
fashion designer also mentions examples of having to explain female
expectations and behaviours ‘ such as taking jewellery off at night ‘ that were
missed by an all-male team.
There’s a popular saying promoting better
gender and race representation that suggests ‘you cannot be what you cannot
see’ ‘ but this could easily be extended to ‘you cannot create for audiences
you don’t represent and understand’. Which is why companies with diverse workforces
are more likely to financially outperform those that are not (McKinsey,
2015). So if you want to ensure your products appeal to an increasingly diverse
consumer landscape, you’d better start with your job adverts.

Brought to you by Stylus Life, creativity and innovation news
from around the web.

This Week In Market Research: 10/19/15 – 10/23/15

This week I came across a very interesting article on Buzzfeed that discussed the gender gap in people who own and or buy drones. The article discusses the issue from a marketing standpoint on how the drone market, which is generating more than $5 billion in revenue, can reach the female audience. The author explains how, upon doing research on women and girls with drones, ”only 3 included images of women and girls engaging with drones, compared to 18 for men and boys. On Shutterstock, I found 4 girls, 28 boys, 12 women, and over 100 men. (The search terms I used were ‘drone,’ ‘drone man,’ ‘drone woman,’ ‘drone girl,’ and ‘drone boy.’ The numbers are taken from looking through the images ‘ discounting unrelated pictures and aerial shots.)’ The article also points out that some attempts have been made to appeal to the female market, although they can be seen as a step in the wrong direction. Some drone booths, in their attempt to reach women, have women dress in revealing clothing to hand out T-shirts that say ‘Chicks dig drone pilots.’ However there are the few marketers that feature, in my opinion, more appropriate tactics such as strong women doing what they love and being featured on drone technology. Upon reading the article, however, I’m still not convinced that the majority of these tactics are moving the female image in the right direction. What do you think?
It’s that time of year again, folks! The infamous Black Friday is approaching us and everyone is stampeding toward’their phones? That’s right. In an article posted on Adage this week, Google is claiming that more consumers are actually using their smartphones to complete Black Friday purchases. ‘More consumers are shelving the traditional, daylong Black Friday shopping experience for short, burst-like purchases made with their smartphones that are spread out over a period of time, or what Google is calling ‘micro-moments.” According to Google’s blog, ‘shopping moments’ will replace the idea of a ‘shopping marathon’ where people spend the night outside of a Best Buy just to cram into the store and buy the latest gadgets for half price. The article presents compelling evidence and numerous studies that show consumers, more and more, are purchasing holiday items from their mobile devices. This comes as great news to someone like myself, who can’t stand waiting in lines and being in a crowded department store. It will be interesting to see the numbers from this upcoming Black Friday as compared to last year to really see the decline as well.
Last week many Advertisers and Marketers ascended upon the Orlando World Center Marriott to attend the Association of national Advertisers’ Masters of Marketing Conference. However, in an Adage article posted this week, many attendees did not find answers to some of their major questions. Questions such as, ‘how does our company get around ad blockers’? received very few, if any, remarks. ‘In Orlando, Mr. Liodice (The group’s CEO) moved quickly off ad blocking, as well as brief mentions of ad fraud, ad viewability problems and a “degenerative and destructive” proposal in Congress to reduce the tax deduction for ad spending. ‘With as many challenges as our industry has,’ he said, ‘we have a growing abundance of opportunities.” Answers such as this one were not received well with companies hoping for a strong and absolute response. However, the article also suggests that perhaps the answer to this direct question lies within General Electric CMO Linda Boff’s suggestion that the answer is as ‘simple as creativity.’ ”Ad blocking, viewability, none of it matters without great work.”

Nichole Dicharry, is a Digital Marketing Assistant at IIR USA, Marketing and Finance Divisions, who works on various aspects of the industry including social media, marketing analysis and media. She can be reached at Ndicharry@iirusa.com

This Week In Market Research: 7/13/15 – 7/17/15

Knowing your consumer is the biggest name of the game for
most companies. So if your employees demographics make up a large percentage of
your consumer base, why not conduct market research internally? This is what
Poshmark, a mobile marketplace for fashion organization, did in giving each employ (over 85 people) apple watches. Around 70% of Pochmark employees are
made up of women who love to shop, according to the founder.  In lieu of launching the Poshmark app, the
move to provide employees with apple watches was motivated by the desire to
gain insight into how women interacted with the new app. After giving the women
time to play around with the app, the results very extremely valuable. Among
many other behaviors noted, the women were extremely happy with the way the app
gave real-time notifications but some individuals were not as drawn to the
amount of images displayed; which could pose an issue for a fashion app that is
driven by images. In general the research was highly educational and showcases
a unique opportunity to conduct market research within the office. 

This week, Google released that it is testing a new feature
that will let consumers purchase products through advertisements. The function,
labeled ‘Purchases on Google’ will allow people using smartphones to ‘click
select search ads to visit retailer-branded product pages hosted by google.’
Going up against competition from companies like Amazon, Google is beginning to
invest in ways that attract the mobile shopper. ‘Thanks to smartphones,
shopping now happens anytime and anywhere,’ a spokesperson from the company
stated. It will be interesting to see where this function takes off from here
and how users will interact with it. 

You’ve seen it everywhere on Facebook: ‘Win free Chipotle
for a year!!’ Like who doesn’t want free Mexican fast food for the next year!?
So why is this irresistibly delicious fact food chain offering free chipotle
for a year and what do they want in return? Well, as it turns out, Chiptotle
just released its own app called, ‘Friend or Faux.’ In order to build more of
an awareness and audience on the app they’re offering a buy one get one free
coupon for anyone who plays the game. On top of that, 50 fortunate players will
be randomly selected to win free chipotle for themselves and a friend for an
entire year. In order to increase your chances of winning, each participant is
encouraged to tweet about ‘Friend or Faux.’ Essentially the game is another way
to highlight that Chipotle tops any other traditional fast food chain as far as
health goes. This campaign carries a brilliant strategy in order to gain more
app attention while also building up the reputation and brand of Chipotle.  

 

Nichole Dicharry,
is a Digital Marketing Assistant at IIR USA, Marketing and Finance Divisions, who
works on various aspects of the industry including social media, marketing
analysis and media. She can be reached at Ndicharry@iirusa.com 
 

What is a hard to reach group? Not what you think.

I saw a title of blog post recently titled “What is a hard to reach group?” The answer seemed obvious – young men, hispanic people, people with high incomes. There are lots of demographic groups that are hard to reach and cause researchers a lot of stress when it comes to filling every cell in a sampling matrix.

But that wasn’t the first thing that came to mind for me. The first thing I thought of was that hard to reach people are those for whom we haven’t found the right value proposition. We haven’t found the incentives that are meaningful to them. That’s the simplest answer.

But, it also means we haven’t found the type of research that feels important to them – our surveys aren’t meaningful to them, our focus groups don’t put them at ease, our individual interviews feel unnatural to them.

Maybe these ‘hard to reach’ groups aren’t hard to reach at all. Maybe we’ve spend all of our time trying to attract and interest mini-mes. People just like me. People who completed highschool. People who went to college. People who work from 9 to 5 and then go home, make dinner, take care of the kids and get to bed by 11.

Maybe, if we stopped trying to recruit mini-mes, if we stepped into the shoes of someone who works the nightshift, someone who plays video games until 3am, someone who only wears designer shoes, maybe we’d find that these hard to reach groups aren’t so hard to reach at all.

Annie Pettit, PhD is the Chief Research Officer at Peanut Labs, a company specializing in self-serve panel sample. Annie is a methodologist focused on data quality, listening research, and survey methods. She won Best Methodological Paper at Esomar 2013, and the 2011 AMA David K. Hardin Award. Annie tweets at @LoveStats and can be reached at annie@peanutlabs.com.

Breaking down your market

At HandMade News, they recently took a look at how to successfully identify who your customers are and what the target market is shaped like. It’s obviously a very small market within your population, but how is a small business to find the market?

They start by identifying market segments:
Age: Are your customers young, middle-aged, or elderly?
Gender: Male or female?
Education: Have they graduated from high school? College?
Income: How much money do they have to spend? Are you targeting people with more or less disposable income?
Marital Status: Single, married, divorced, or widowed?
Ethnic and religious background
Family life cycle: Newly married, new baby, married for years, how old the children are

And then they go on to narrow it down further:
Lifestyle: trendy, conservative, pinching pennies, extravagant?
Social class: lower, middle, upper?
Opinion: open-minded or set in her ways?
Activities and interests: how does she spend her time? Reading? Watching TV? Riding her bike?
Attitudes and beliefs: is she interested in green products? Is she a community activist?

Figuring these things out can help you narrow down your target market and successfully find the right people to market your product to. If you’ve already done this, how have the demographics above changed with fewer customers spending less money these days?

What type of research can you get from social networks?

David C. Skul has a great video up about how to use the data you get from your social networks as research. You can ask those in your targeted group for their opinions, collect data through polls, you can see the exact demographics that your targeting (as they are in your group) and it’s a way to get traffic to your site.

Watch the video here:

Market Research and Online Communities

Matt Rhodes recently posted on the FreshNetworks Blog that the market research industry should embrace online communities. One of the reasons why he believes communities should be taken advantage by market research professionals is because of the staggering numbers of online community adoption. According to the latest report form Gartner, more than 60% of large US firms will have built an online community used to engage with clients by the year 2010.

With the growing number of people turning to social media, the market research industry can use these communities as a great source of insight. Communities provide a great platform on collecting data on demographics as well as feedback and information on products directly from clients and the consumer.

MySpace Music’s new ad services

With the new launch of MySpace Music, they’ve also launched a new way to target the musicians surfing the site. According to this article at Social Times, this new self-service ad targeting service allows advertisers to choose which users see which ads selected by demographics.

After creating an ad that is either 728×90 or 300×250, the advertiser can choose to have it’s ad targeted by gender, age, location, specific interest or categories (such as music, movies, fitness and health, etc) . Then, users are broken down target audiences according to the selection of the advertiser. These campaigns run on a cost per click basis rather than impression.