Tag Archives: Customer

Consumer Behavior, DIY, Omnichannel and Millennials

By: Keri Hodnik and
Liz Williams, Euromonitor International

This article was
originally published on Euromonitor
The Market Research Event, TMRE, is an annual conference
that seeks to unite both clients and vendors, positioning itself as the only
event in the world with twice as many client side participants than any other
industry event of its kind. This year, it was held in Boca Raton, Florida, and
covered a wide range of topics, including: People; Tools, Tech, and
Methodology; Innovation, Macro Trends; Customer; Omni-Shopper, B2B /
Health&Wellness; and Partnerships. TMRE hosts a broad array of speakers,
from CEOs of Fortune 500 Companies to Neuroscientists that seek to decode the
mind of the consumer.
The theme of the entire event was ‘Command the Boardroom’,
which focused on how to bring the eyes and ears of the consumer into the
boardroom itself. The presence of the Consumer Insights function is not only
needed to energise the boardroom on the importance of the ever changing
consumer, but it is crucial in representing the big ideas that drive business
With that theme setting the stage for the event, the
following four trends emerged from the speakers:
Better understanding the inner workings of the consumer was
a common theme at this year’s TMRE Conference. Zoe Chance, Author of ‘Better
Influence’ and Assistant Professor of Marketing at Yale School of Management,
led a keynote on Mastering Influence & Persuasion.
Chance was driven to leave the world of corporate marketing
to understand behavioral economics after observing a repeating trend: companies
often put a lot of time, money and energy into using data for business
decisions, but in the end, would use their guts anyway. Why is that?
Chance went on to explain the difference between System 1
and System 2 decision making. These are better known as the unconscious and
conscious mind, or as she called them: ‘Alligator Brain’ and ‘The Court’. The
unconscious mind is fast, it’s intuitive and it’s automatic. On the other hand,
the conscious mind is slow, deliberate and effortful. Most of us believe that
we’re making decisions with The Court, but Alligator Brain kicks in far more
often than we care to realise.
Rather than trying to ineffectively engage consumers’
conscious mind, Chance suggests that instead we should be working to peak the
Alligator Brain with her 5 key forces of influence:
  • Labelling: giving a name to the behaviour that you wish to
    encourage or discourage.
  • Ease: ‘Alligators are lazy’; companies like Uber, Tinder and
    Amazon are great examples of how to make it as easy as possible for consumers
    to take action.
  • Attention: creating open loops, or Moments of Truth (as
    coined by P&G), both stimulate curiosity since we as consumers have an
    insatiable want to close the loop.
  • Scarcity: loss aversion is a powerful motivator and can be
    roused by communications such as limited time, limited quantity and
  • ‘Hot Potato’: when forced with resistance, give it back as a
    problem to solve. If someone says they’re not interested, instead try asking:
    ‘You’re not interested’? as a way to promote deliberate decision making.

The subject of the conscious versus unconscious mind was
revisited again by David Eagleman: Neuroscientist, Author of ‘Incognito: the
Secret Lives of the Brain’ and Host of PBS’ ‘The Brain with David Eagleman’.
In his talk on ‘Emotion, Motivation, and Reputation’, he
explained that there is an enormous gap between what your brain is doing and
what your conscious mind is actually thinking. ‘Everything about your cognition
is happening incognito,’ Eagleman said. The implication of the unconscious
brain being the core driver of decision making is that asking consumers
questions about their decision making process is irrelevant.
Neuroscience can tell us a lot about the driving forces
behind the consumer path to purchase. Eagleman explained that there are three
networks in the brain: one for price point, one for pleasure and one for how
the decision itself is viewed:
  • Valuation: everything is judged in context. Saving $10 on a
    pair of headphones has a higher consumer response than saving $10 on an iPhone,
    despite the benefit being equal. We as consumers do not actually know what we
    want until we see it in context.
  • Emotion: despite our want to believe we are rational and
    unbiased, our actions prove otherwise. For instance, did you know that humans
    make harsher decisions if in a fowl smelling room?
  • Social: Eagleman explained that ‘people are wired to
    understand companies the same way they understand people. Breaches of trust
    travel fast and are un-erasable.’

DIY Research was a key theme for one of the tracks at the
event, focusing on how and when to ‘be scrappy’ with research. DIY research is
a cost effective alternative to outsourcing solutions that allows you to
analyse research results in real time. As Andrea Stokes, the Senior Director of
Consumer Insights at Marriott International, said in her session titled, ‘Cheap
and Cheerful DIY Research’, it’s important to know when it makes sense to
pursue DIY research and also when it makes sense not to:
5 reasons to go DIY:
When you need it fast
When you have an easily accessible customer
When the question is not a $20,000+ question
When a question can be answered by consumer
feedback alone, meaning that advanced analytics and modelling are not required
When you have only 60 minutes of your
stakeholders’ time
5 reasons not to go DIY:
When the ask is complex
When more than one translation is needed
When data will help to defend or prevent a large
When the CEO needs to make a business case to
the Board of Directors
When research is needed for crisis management
Some of the tools that Stokes suggests to aid in DIY
research are software, such as survey software and an insight community
platform through which to conduct your research. Mobile devices like iPads and
smartphones make data collection fast and easy, while tools such as excel or
other data visualization programs like Tableau are essential for storytelling.
Last, all that is needed is you (and maybe a videographer to capture the

Any Channel, Anytime, Anywhere: Today’s consumer is very
busy with little downtime, always on the go, always carrying their phones and
always connected to the internet. Consumers are looking for a more convenient
and seamless way to shop given their busy lifestyles. Many businesses realize
this and are changing to fit consumer’s needs by providing seamless easier ways
to shop. Several examples include:
Sephora Flash ‘ Sephora’s new stores that allow
consumers to purchase an item online or through the app and pick up in store
the following days
Charity Wait ‘ an app that allows consumers to
donate to a charity in order to skip a line at their favourite restaurant
Shyp ‘ an app that allows consumers to ship out
postal packages without having to visit the USPS store. The consumer arranges a
time for pick-up and Shyp will pick up the box and send it to the nearby post
Task Rabbit ‘ an app that offers a personal
assistant to complete your tasks that you have to do throughout the day, making
your day more efficient
Customized Products: Even though consumers are on the go,
they are still making specific decisions on what they are purchasing. Consumers
are looking for more personalisation and customisation in their lives and they
want it to be easy.
Ugg has made it easier for consumers to try on shoes by
providing them with an interactive floor mat that allows them to picture what
the shoe would look like on
Break Free of Demographics: Consumers want to break free of
demographics. They are looking for more of a new wholesome look which basically
means retailers should start positioning products as being non-gender.

Many large tech gurus such as Facebook even have a difficult
time capturing all types of consumer market research data. Companies like
Facebook capture any shopper data on mobile phones and desk top data but are
not able to see what is happening outside of their own space. Facebook
expresses that it is important to capture all channels of shopper insights to
understand the full data set for the ever changing consumer.
Facebook has found that through their internal data numbers,
consumers tend to have a purchasing pattern per omnichannel. Many consumer turn
to mobile to shop for categories that are less expensive, perhaps because it
doesn’t take much thought or commitment to purchase these items that might be
used every day. However, consumers tend to turn to their desktop for categories
that are more expensive which may be due to internet connection worry or being
able to see the product on a larger screen.

What Facebook is unaware of through internal data is
in-store shopping habits. This type of data may help companies like Facebook
understand what brand elements trigger market behaviour, what is going to drive
consumers to make purchases in store, what the importance of labels play when
shopping in different channels and how can they measure behaviour of a shopper
on each channel.

#MediaInsights Day 3 Recap

Day 3 started with co-chair Bruce Friend recapping Day 2,
then introducing today’s first keynote speaker.

Paul Depodesta, CSO of Cleveland Browns,
engaged the audience with an overview that there’s a certain way that things
work.  Whether baseball, black jack, or
other situations in life, there’s always that ‘rule of thumb’ that we are
taught to follow.  However, sometimes the
‘rule’ doesn’t always work.  It’s all
about the process. Paul described a process/outcome quad:

Good process/ Good outcome =
Good process/ Bad outcome
= just unlucky
Bad process/
Good outcome = get lucky once, but then rely on that luck to be successful
Bad process/
Bad outcome = recipe for failure 

So, how do you
win with a lack of resources? 

Putting together a championship team is like cooking a
gourmet meal – you need the right ingredients. We’re always asking the naive questions- why is the market
down, why is this player struggling? We need a reason, but there not always is
a reason, so we try to explain by creating our own cause and relationships.
As with The
Oakland A’s in Moneyball, sometimes we need to throw out the old metrics, that
‘rule of thumb’ and start new.  Key
takeaways he learned from testing these new metrics were:         
Find skillful
affordable talent to replace high priced starts
Statistics can
be misleading
He drew
comparisons of scouting baseball players to testing programs.  Emotions drive our decisions, and we tend to
look for data to support and confirm these decisions, while dismissing any data
that contradicts what we believe.

Paul left us
with these 3 points: 
become aware
of biases
relentless in asking the naive question
in the game of
uncertainty, how can we beat the house? Learn by previous failures to better
hit success.

The late morning keynote was actually broken
into 3 parts.  Robin Garfield of CNN
spoke first, and then we heard Dr. John Lapinski from NBC News, followed by a
Q&A with our 2 speakers.

Millennials told us they wanted a candidate who has a plan
Create good paying jobs
Make healthcare more affordable

Millennials also told us they didn’t want a candidate who:
Represents ‘more of the same’
They were looking for a transformational candidate – someone
who will ‘change the government’, and that they were ‘done with the Clintons
and Bushes.’
Most Millennials liked Bernie Sanders, and both
Trump and Clinton were viewed negatively.

Not only was 2016 the most watched year on record in cable
news (with over 3 million total P2+ aggregate audience), but more people came
out to vote in 2016 than ever before.
2000 ‘ 105.4
million total turnout (54.2% of eligible population that voted)
2004 ‘ 122.3 million
2008 ‘ 131.3
million (61.6%)
2012 ‘ 129,1
million (58.6%)
2016 ‘ 136.6
million (59.0%)
We were show examples of ‘what-if’ scenarios, that
demonstrated how close the election really was.
While Clinton’s popular vote lead was just shy of 3 million
(65.8 million for Clinton compared to 63.0 million for Trump), the red/blue map
showed that the majority of Clinton’s popular vote came from New York and
California.  And the 2016 Electoral
College hinged on a handful of states, with Trump taking Florida and the Rust
Belt states (Iowa, Michigan, Ohio, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin).

Jane Clark, from the Coalition for Innovative Media
Measurement, moderated this panel which included:
Jed Meyer (Univision), Jonathan Steuer (Omnicom),
Carol Hinnant (comScore), Steven Schmitt
(TiVo) and Kelly Abcarian (Nielsen).
The panel gave us a perspective of the industry from the
network, agency, and measurement side.  They
addressed the integrity of data and optimizing tools for better plans.  They talked about how there’s a constant
struggle trying to bring all measurement across all platforms together.
Kelly stressed how measurement needs to be a team sport.  Media companies are more and more starting to
own their own data, and that changes the dynamic of the industry.
There is a call from the network and agency side for duration
weighted viewable impressions across all platforms, and the measurement
companies just aren’t there yet.  The
question remains ‘ how do we get there?
The Day 3
afternoon Audience Insights breakouts were:
‘ Meghann Elrhoul, Twitter
‘ Thomas
Grayman, SpikeTV
The Innovations
in Media
breakouts were:
‘ Rob McLoughlin, POPSUGAR
Below are the Track 1 – Targeting Viewers case

ESPN’s David Hobbie gave us insight to David’s study focused on an advertising
campaign during this past year’s Olympics in Rio, and the impact and brand lift
experienced on ESPN Latin America.
The last case study track of the conference had Theresa
Pepe of Viacom give us an in depth look at kids’ data and… The
Story of Me.
We learned about kids under 11 and how they are the most
diverse kids ever. They make up 15.4% of the US population, and are extremely
Theresa showed us a breakdown of these kids
focusing on:
My beginning
My world
My family
My friends
My tech
My dreams
Me in a nutshell. 

Since they were born these kids experienced: 
- The
first Black president 
- Terrorism
- Marriage equality 
- Great recession 
- YouTubers 
- On demand 
- Social Media 
- Device overload 
- Gender neutrality 

Their role models are their families’ and some
celebrities.  While 78% of girls look up
to mom, on 58% of boys look up to dad. 
26% said the look up to a grandparent, while the rest of their role
models included YouTube/Vine stars (19%), teacher (18%), brother (17%), sister
(15%), aunt/uncle/cousin (13%), actor/actress (10%), athlete (10%).
And they are busy!  6.2
hours of the day they are in school, while the rest of their day entails
sleeping (8.7 hours), eating/traveling (1.7 hours), organized sports/activities
(.9 hours), doing homework (.8 hours), and 6.4 hours going towards leisure (26%
of their day.)
In their free time, they watch TV (48%), play with toys
(43%), play video games (33%), and play outside (18%).

The Conference concluded with a wrap-up with the year’s
co-chairs and the advisory panel giving their feedback of the sessions,
discussing plans for next year’s conference, and taking questions from the

Implicit Bias and How Smirnoff is Transforming Global Attitudes Towards Others

This post was
originally published on the Sentient
Decision Science Blog

The phrase ‘implicit bias’ often carries a nasty
connotation. Here’s just one headline from the last four months: ‘How Racism
Persists: Unconscious Bias May Play a Role.’
Partiality. Prejudice. Racism. And this bias is thought
to be all the more insidious because it’s locked away in our subconscious where
we can’t do anything about it.
But as Dr. Aaron Reid explained in his TMRE 2016
presentation Wednesday, implicit bias is not necessarily negative or
positive’it’s both.
‘Implicit bias is simply a systematic tendency toward
something,’ Dr. Reid explained. ‘It’s the automatic associations you have in
your mind, and those associations can be positive and they can be negative.’
Implicit Bias and Behavior

While System
1 certainly influences behavior
, it’s not the only thing that determines
how people act. If we have the motivation and the opportunity, we can
influence whether our System 1 mind impacts our behavior or not.
‘When you have either low motivation or lack the opportunity
to reflect and reason, your implicit attitude has a much stronger impact on
your judgment or behavior,’ said Dr. Reid. ‘But when you’re motivated and have
the opportunity, your System 2 thinking can intervene if you don’t want
an implicit attitude to influence behavior.’
Science provides methods for quantifying implicit
biases, both positive and negative. Sentient
Prime implicit research technology
, for example, can give you a read on
your degree of biases both toward and away from people, from brands, products,
and advertising.
It’s called implicit association testing and it’s a powerful
tool that helps measure the impact of the non-conscious.
Can We Change
Implicit Associations to Be More Inclusive?

In the Spring of 2016, Sentient examined implicit
biases in a study with Smirnoff. The project objective,
born from the mind of Smirnoff’s Luke Atkinson, was to make a real
contribution to the world with the idea of a brand that ‘welcomes everyone’ and
stands for ‘good times together.’
Atkinson wanted to focus on inclusivity.
Opposite the concept of implicit bias, inclusivity
moves people from thinking, ‘How do we prevent or reduce prejudice,’ to ‘How do
we promote inclusivity’? And that positive, welcoming feeling is
what Smirnoff wanted its brand to inspire.
Implicit Association
Testing in Action

We captured baseline data in two studies about
inclusivity from 1,400 United Kingdom respondents and 1,300 from the United
States. From there, we could see if the creative content produced by the
Smirnoff brand could actually make people feel more inclusive toward
We utilized implicit and explicit measures from the
behavioral sciences in five comprehensive areas of inclusivity:
Feeling included
Sharing identity
Motivation to act inclusively
Inclusive lifestyle choices
Inclusive socializing
Three segments emerged from the data in both the U.S. and
the U.K:
The Isolated: those who feel excluded and act
Excluded Strivers: those who make inclusive
lifestyle choices but feel excluded

Inclusive Included: those who feel included
and also act more inclusively
We were then able to analyze implicit attitudes toward
groups of people’based on race, gender, sexuality, and more’and split the
results by segment. Some of the results were sobering.
‘If you ask people an explicit question like this, you’re
not going to get the real answer,’ Dr. Reid said.
‘But if you measure it implicitly you get really keen
insight: a significant portion of the population has a negative implicit
bias toward ‘old people’, toward ‘poor people’, and toward ‘disabled people’.’
Smirnoff Opens Up to Promote Inclusivity
Based on our baseline data, Smirnoff created an
ad targeted at changing attitudes toward disabled people.

Smirnoff was proud of the creative. But would it have a real
Sentient performed a Subtext’ ad
 to see whether exposure to the ad was changing the implicit
memory structures within Smirnoff’s target audience’s mind. Using consumer
neuroscience tools, we measured the four key components of
advertising effectiveness:
Desirability (a combination of System 1 and
System 2)
Emotional preference following exposure to the ad showed a complete reversal
following a single exposure to that 40-second clip.
‘From a brand preference perspective,’ Dr. Reid noted, ‘this
is a very successful ad.’
Digging Deeper Into the Data
Emotional memory analysis carried the study a step
further by analyzing which elements of the ad are responsible for the
change in implicit attitude.
‘The implicit memory connections are changing in the
minds of consumers when you show them your ad,’ Dr. Reid explained. ‘We can cut
the data to see the moments of the ad that are related to those
memory changes that you’re trying to affect.’
Among female viewers, there were clear positive
emotional deviations at the moments that the primary female student was telling
her story and began to feel the joy of dancing.
So impact on the brand is clear. What about inclusivity? Did
we strike an impact? Did we change people’s attitudes to feel more inclusive?
Only among women.
‘The storytelling at the beginning of the ad isn’t
resonating in a positive way with men on average, it appears to reinforce a
negative bias toward disabled people among the ‘Isolated’ segment’ noted
Dr. Reid. ‘It provided insight into how to optimize the creative with cuts that
tell the story of the male focal character, Chris Fonseca, in a clear and
compelling way to men.’
For the Isolate segment, what may be missing
is motivation. Opportunity to change their judgment is there, but
without motivation, there’s no override for that System 1 bias.
Next Steps for Smirnoff (and the Rest of Us?)
For its part, Smirnoff is planning a global rollout of the
‘We’re Open campaign.’ The next ad being tested:
Regardless of the results, Smirnoff’s efforts show how it’s
possible for us to address implicit bias in this country and globally. First we
need to understand that System 1 mind’where it comes from’then we can focus on
how to influence change.

As Dr. Reid said: ‘We need to understand how
reason and emotion work together 
to drive behavior.’

Alligators in the Board Room

By: Christina Luppi, Manager, Sentient
Decision Science

This post was originally published on the Sentient Decision Science Blog.
‘Command the Board Room’ is the theme at TMRE 2016. A lofty
goal, perhaps. But maybe not so lofty if you’re equipped with the right
, TMRE 2016′s chairperson, immediately endeared himself to the audience
by dubbing himself the ‘biggest failure’ in the ballroom. He cited multiple
tanked businesses, several career restarts, and a credit score of 300
to support the claim. Why so eager to have his failures be known? To help
people better understand how they can succeed.
‘Insights teams need to play a critical role in the board
room,’ Yu stressed. When decision makers want to know why big
ideas fail, they find the answer is often human.
Even when the desirability is validated, when the
concepts are good and the budgets are excellent, ideas can
bomb because of people.
People run into walls of fear when approached with a
new idea, said Yu. Next, they run into walls of apathy because so
many things are competing for their interest. Lastly, they run into walls of
disbelief and are desperate for proof.
‘Ideas don’t sell themselves,’ Yu explained. ‘You can’t just
have the right content. It requires us becoming champions in the board room.
Those walls are human dynamics and exist even with the right content.’
The walls Yu mentioned aren’t about what is right and wrong,
they’re emotional barriers all marketers have to deal with at some
point. Insights help us break through.
TMRE keynote speaker Zoe Chance left
corporate marketing to get her PhD because she wanted to study the complexities
of decision making. Really, frustration in the field made her determined
to help people make research-based decisions that make sense, rather than see
them go with their gut.
What she found is that marketers actually need to suck
it up and learn to work better with the board members who make gut
decisions’that’s just who we are as a species. Humans are ruled by
‘alligator psychology,’ she noted.
Something we know as System
1 thinking
‘I refer to [System 1 and System 2] as the
‘alligator brain’ and the ‘court,” Chance explained. ‘System 1 is unconscious,
fast’ an automatic decision maker. We only imagine the court is making more
decisions than it is.’
Rather than trying to force feed data down the throats
of people who won’t swallow, Chance suggested researchers better understand
the emotional motivations of our System 1 brains
She outlined five key forces of influence:
Labeling: Giving a name to behavior you want to
encourage or discourage.
Ease: Ease of use is a more powerful
motivator than even pleasure. This is a principle practiced to perfection by
companies like Amazon and Uber.
Attention: Moments of truth, open loops,
and the Zeigarnik effect.
Scarcity: Operates through loss aversion.
‘Hot potato’: When faced with resistance,
instead of pushing, hand back a problem to solve.
Notice the acronym? ‘If you’re going to walk an alligator,
it helps to have a LEASH,’ Chance said with a smile.
Of course, alligators can be lazy. They sometimes need
persuading to bite.
, best-selling author of Freakonomics and SuperFreakonomics talked
about the power of incentives in marketing.
‘Never underestimate the power of free. It doesn’t matter
how much of something somebody’s got, how much they’re worth; the alligator
part of our brain’ will just zap at it.’
To illustrate, Dubner told a story of how the world-renowned
Cedars-Sinai Hospital in Los Angeles dealt with a particular problem, a big
problem. Doctors were not washing their hands.
Yes, really.
The issue wasn’t a matter of education’doctors know the
science and danger of bacteria’it was a matter of communication. How do
you tell medical professionals they must do something they already know they
must do?
The hospital tried incentivizing a hand washing program with
Starbucks gift cards. And the wealthy MDs snapped them up as though they
couldn’t afford their own coffee.
‘They turned a life and death problem into a game they
wanted to play,’ said Dubner. But the card didn’t raise the overall rate of hand washing.
‘Data can get you at the ‘what’ pretty easily, and the
‘what’ didn’t work. The ‘why’ is complicated.’
Why gets into psychology, sometimes even into
religion. It also delves into the subconscious. What doctors would admit
they don’t wash their hands in a hospital?
‘Self-reported data is close to worthless,’ said
Dubner. ‘This is why we need to know not what people are telling you they
will do; we need to get data about what they actually will do.’
Eventually, the board at Cedars-Sinai created graphic
images of the bacteria found on their own hands and placed the image
on every computer screen saver at Cedars-Sinai. By showing doctors the
danger and triggering an emotional response, the research team got the
hand-washing rate up to 100-percent almost overnight.
‘If that’s the way the human brain works, let’s find a way
to take advantage of that and exploit it for some good,’ Dubner concluded.

In that light, understanding alligator brain actually
sounds pretty rational.

Whole Brain Thinking: The New Insights Mindset

By: Steve August
In the September 2016 issue of Harvard Business Review, there is a remarkable article titled
‘Building and Insights Engine.’ Its three co-authors, Frank van den Driest of
Kantar Vermeer, Stan Sthanunathan, and Keith Weed of Unilever, describe how the
results of a research study with over 350 businesses and nearly 10,000
practitioners show that the highest performing companies put the customer at
the center of their activities through an a dynamic insights and analytics
But what was even more fascinating, was how the the authors
laid out a blueprint for the optimal characteristics of what they term an
‘insights engine.’  

Ten Characteristics of an Effective Insights

According to the authors, the blueprint for an effective
insights engine consists of ten characteristics: seven operational
characteristics and three people characteristics. The seven operational characteristics

Data synthesis (ability to connect disparate data)
Integrated planning
Forward looking orientation
Affinity for action
The critical people characteristics as:
Whole-brain mindset
Business focus
It is easy to look to focus on the seven operational
characteristics, but actually it is first of the three people characteristics
that is especially important – as it underpins all of the other operational
aspects. As the authors state, ‘Whole-brain
thinking is at the core of the insights engine.’  
This is an extraordinarily important point. Historically,
insights teams are organized with left-brain quant and analytics people working
separately from the creative right-brain qualitative team members. However, the
research showed that a differentiating attribute of the high performing
organizations was their ability to integrated the two types of thinking: 71%
for the high performing organizations versus 42% for the underperforming ones.
In a sense, one of the key underpinnings of a successful organization is how
well its people can draw on both right and left brain thinking. Or to put it
another way, the degree in which an organization can have a whole-brain mindset
can very well determine how successful a company will be.
These findings send an important message to the insights
industry. So often quant and qual efforts work in parallel or in sequence, but
not truly together. We often treat our analytical thinking and our creative and
storytelling thinking as two separate efforts, when more than ever they need to
be truly integrated. We need to be able to make connections between what we
find in the voluminous amounts of data at our disposal and the first hand
observations of the ground truth of people’s behaviors – and then collaborate
with our stakeholders translate what we learn into compelling stories that
drive action.
Van den Driest, Sthanunathan, Weed summed it up brilliantly
at the close of their article:
Having troves of data
is of little value in and of itself. What increasingly separates the winners
from the losers is the ability to transform data into insights about consumers’
motivations and to turn those insights into strategy.’
The authors showed that a truly effective insights function
is as much about how people think as is it about operational capacity. It is
time for the insights industry to embrace whole-brain thinking.  
About the Author: Steve
August is the CMO of FocusVision, the global leader in market research
technology. A pioneer in online qualitative research, Steve created Revelation,
the industry leading platform for mobile diaries, insight communities and
bulletin boards. Apart from speaking and hosting an array of conferences, he is
fascinated with design, technology and smart methodology’and how they can be
fused to get to the heart of everyday moments that reveal people’s emotions and

Top 5 Reasons Why OmniShopper is Your Key to Retail Success

With the summer holidays now behind us, are you ready to
book your OmniShopper International ticket?
If you haven’t really thought about it yet, that’s ok.
There’s still time for you commit for 2016. In fact, we’ve come up with a short
list of why OmniShopper is YOUR can’t miss destination for retail success:
1.       Uncover
the Latest Shopper Research Methodologies

Emmanuel Malard, Consumer & Market Insight Manager, Samsung Electronics
details how Samsung validated the use of 360?? virtual reality immersion became
part of the research toolkit for their insights team, and what’s coming on the
2.       Integrate
Omnichannel Retail Strategies to Connect

Kantar Retail’s Owen McCabe will provide you with an overview of the
omnichannel ecosystem, and how smart brand owners are effectively connecting
with their consumers by leveraging omnichannel for competitive advantage.
3.       Become
a Great Marketing Leader

With the guidance of Patrick Barwise, Emeritus Professor of Management &
Marketing, London Business School, you’ll learn how to maximize your business
impact and long-term career success by complementing your technical marketing
skills with a range of leadership skills. Plus, get an inside look at the soon
to be released book, The 12 Powers of a Marketing Leader.
4.       Prepare
Your Organization for the Next Data Revolution

Big Data will soon be a thing of the past, at least according to Martin
Lindstrom. What’s next, the seemingly insignificant consumer observations that
will completely transform the way businesses are built and run, soon to be
known as SMALL DATA.
5.       Embrace
Disruptive Trends & Innovations

Henry Mason will show you can get ahead of your customers’ rapidly accelerating
expectations by generating actionable foresight, and relying on the latest
trends and innovations across the retail and media landscapes.
Download the brochure for the full programme: http://bit.ly/2csCgQH
Book your ticket by
Friday, 23 of September and save ??200. Plus, Use code OMNIINTL16BL for ??100 off
the current rate ‘ Secure your spot today! Buy tickets:
We hope to see you in London!

The OmniShopper Team



Top 3 Trends in Mobile Surveys

By: Aaron Jue,
Each year, we analyze the millions of surveys hosted on our
online survey platform, Decipher, to get insights into respondent survey-taking
behaviors and investigate the latest mobile survey trends including these three
key trends market researchers need to know.
Trend #1: Online survey starts from smartphone devices continue to grow
Mobile devices represent close to 30% of all survey starts
(Figure 1). The mobile growth trend in online surveys follows the overall
global trend of device usage. Industry analysts forecast smartphone
subscriptions from 2015 will double to 6.4 billion worldwide by 2021.[1]
As smartphones increasingly replace the PC for primary
internet usage, we expect that the population of smartphone survey takers will
follow the same trend.
#2: Mobile friendly surveys = improved participation rates
Mobile survey participation rates have steadily improved
while participation rates for desktop users have remained stable.
This reflects Decipher client projects which, over the
years, have increasingly deployed mobile friendly surveys.  We’re constantly discussing best survey design
practices for mobile devices and these have been tested and put to good
use.  By default all surveys hosted on
the Decipher platform employ a responsive survey design with options for many
dynamic and mobile friendly question types (e.g. card sort,  buttons).
Researchers are adjusting to the needs of the growing usage
for mobile devices, and survey designs have gotten better and smarter.
Trend #3: Mobile penetration depends on sample source
The level of mobile participation for a given survey depends
on the sample characteristics. It is known, for instance that in the US,
minority groups, youths, and upper income individuals show higher incidence of
smartphone use.[2]
Whether a survey employs panel sample or client supplied
sample (e.g. list of customers) has a tremendous impact as well.When a
client-supplied list is used, more than a quarter of respondents access the
survey using a smartphone; that number falls to 10% for panel respondents
(Figure 2).
Panel supplied sample has always had far fewer smartphone
survey takers.  We suspect that’s because
this population expects to receive surveys, and will use a PC out of habit or
for the better survey-user experience (i.e. larger screen size, mouse /
keyboard input). But the number of mobile panel members is growing and has more
than doubled since 2013.  Besides the
increasing reliance on smartphone devices to access the internet,  the growing industry acceptance and
deployment of smartphone friendly survey designs are undoubtedly driving this
Things Market
Researchers MUST Consider in 2016
As the mobile population continue to grow, it’s becoming
increasingly clear that researchers must adhere to mobile friendly principles
for online surveys. We can no longer simply resize surveys designed for the PC
and serve them on a smartphone without any regard for the smaller screen. It
leaves respondents frustrated with tiny text, input buttons, or horizontal
scales partially cut off from view. A survey that is friendly and optimized
across all platforms drives better data and higher respondent participation.
About Aaron Jue, FocusVision Market Research Director
With more than 10
years of full-service online survey knowledge and research, Aaron keeps
FocusVision at the forefront of new market research trends and best survey
design practices to maximize response rates and data quality. His role is to
capture key internal business performance metrics and FV customer insights.





Catch & Release: Elevating the Researcher/Customer Relationship

By: Kevin Lonnie, Founder,
KL Communications

I would argue that market research has not lived up to its
reciprocal relationship with the customer. 
In theory, we are the conduit that allows their voice to be heard so our
clients can make better decisions.
But this is a one-way relationship where we hold all the
cards.  That’s why we get to ask all the
questions.  In fact, the customer is
afforded few opportunities to change the nature of the conversation. 
And speaking from years of perspective (oh man, it’s been a
bunch of years), we’ve done little to elevate the nature of the relationship.
We still refer to questionnaire input as data capture.  We still fall back on grid questions and
often underestimate the length of the primary survey experience.  We still rely on paltry economic incentivizing.  Well into the 21st Century, we continue with
our ‘catch & release’ approach to customer feedback.  Of course, over time, the customer has become
leery of our ‘hooks’ and passes on future attempts to have their opinions
heard.  The net effect is we’re left with
the limited, non-representative segment of the population still willing to
OK, what can we do to elevate the nature of the client/customer
relationship?  After all, there’s no
association or code of conduct that requires researchers to actually make the
customer experience ‘enjoyable’.
To our credit, there has been a decade’s worth of
conversation on the need to add gamification and social incentives to our repertoire.  Unfortunately, little progress has been made
as this is counterproductive to the budget. 
Elevating the researcher/customer relationship is not going
to happen overnight.   Heck, we’ve spent
the past 70 years doing our best to wreck it. 
Despite all that, I can envision a gradual migration away from traditional
data collection tools to customer empowerment tools.   As millennials begin to take on senior
positions, I think there will be a natural desire to bring social reciprocity
to the world of market research.
As for myself, I think the fundamental questions become;
Do we wish to empower or capture our customers? 
What are the terms of the new marketplace relationship? 
Is it based on mutual empowerment or are we to view
customers as acquired goods? 
If we choose the latter, it surely doesn’t promote a common
or sustainable purpose. 
The smart organizations will choose an empowered
relationship with their customers for the simple reasons that it represents the
best value (far greater understanding of unmet needs/new product opportunities)
and because it represents the only sustainable option. 
KL Communications is a
research agency with a specialty in collaborative online communities. While
traditional online communities capture the opinion of crowds, only KLC delivers
the wisdom of crowds via our proprietary CrowdWeaving’ platform!

Get Unprecedented Access to Stephen Dubner at TMRE

TMRE Brings You the Best in Insights, Featuring Exclusive
Access to Best-Selling Author, Stephen Dubner
The world-renowned author of Freakonomics and
SuperFreakonomics, will reveal how you can leverage the power of incentives to
uncover human behavior.

Dubner is taking to the keynote stage at TMRE: The Market Research Event this
fall to show you, no matter what industry you’re a part of, how to inspire
change in both your organization as well is in your customers’ minds.

The first 10 people to register with code DUBNER receive
complimentary access to the VIP lunch with Stephen.
Book Your Today: http://bit.ly/2bdhOoM
Stephen Dubner is just one of the amazing insights leaders
at TMRE. Access more than 120 sessions from cross-industry insights leaders,
Consumer Goods Perspective: PepsiCo’s Director
of Insights & Analytics talks about the evolution of their state of the art
Gatorade Mission Control Center and it’s new approach to digital insights.
Pharmaceutical Perspective: Merck’s Executive
Director of Global Customer and Brand Insights details the art of transforming
insights into stories and strategies that drive results.
Financial Service Perspective: MasterCard’s Data
Visualization expert details why Data Visualization is the key to Empowering
Powerful Business Decisions
Retail Perspective: Walmart’s Senior Director of
Customer Insights & Analytics reveals how the combination of Big Data and
traditional research methods can lead to stronger insights
Media & Entertainment Perspective: SVPs from
AMC and Cablevision come together to share best practices on how to join forces
on data driven business insights.
Travel Perspective: Marriott’s Senior Director
of Consumer Insights reveals low-cost research for high-impact results.
And so much more!
Download the TMRE brochure for the full agenda and
session details: http://bit.ly/2bdhOoM
Use exclusive LinkedIn discount code TMRE16LI for $100 off:
See you in Boca Raton this fall!
The TMRE Team


Differentiated Customer Experience: Easier Said

By: Rick Kieser,

This post was recently
published on Ascribe’s

Differentiated customer experience (CX) is a deceptively
challenging goal shared by growing numbers of companies. In a recent presentation on Digital
Marketing Trends
 by Mike Corak to
the Cincinnati AMA,
we heard a lot of valuable insights, but one statistic in particular caught our
attention.  On slide 36 in his presentation, Mike quoted an
independent study that said ’89% of companies plan to compete primarily based
on customer experience in 2016.’
It sounds smart and admirable, but what does really
mean to compete on customer experience, and what does it really take?  One
thing it means is ‘something different for every company,’ because to compete ‘
to differentiate ‘ means that you are setting yourself apart as better,
special, even unique.
Easier Said Than Done

In order to truly compete on the basis of differentiated
customer experience, you must:
Identify what makes (or could make) you special
Understand the underlying drivers of your
differentiated customer experience
Deliver it consistently and monitor customer
sentiment relative to your differentiator
So how do you tackle the differentiation challenge and turn
it to your advantage?  The answer is this: ask, analyze, act and ask
again.  Simple, right?  Well asking can be, but what comes next can
set leaders apart.  If you process your open-ended feedback in context
with the rest of your survey data, you can very quickly generate actionable
insights to identify, understand, deliver and monitor your unique customer
Build on Customer

In our own independent research, 91% of respondents said
they collect some kind of unstructured comments, but only about 60% do anything
at all with that feedback and a mere 30% drive their data all the way to real,
actionable insights.  That’s a far cry from the 89% who recently claimed
they would be differentiating based on customer experience!
To us, that translates tremendous opportunity for companies
to capitalize on assets they already have (survey data and open-ends) to
generate insights that can reveal and strengthen their own differentiated
customer experience proposition.